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There's something I still dont understand about instant vector and range vectors

Instant vector - a set of time series containing a single sample for each time series, all sharing the same timestamp.

Range vector - a set of time series containing a range of data points over time for each time series.

And I can only graph an instant vector.
I get instant vector when I write in the expression: my_metric_name and I see the value of the metric with no timestamp. How then can it be graphed? if it has only one value now. Range vector seems more logical as it has values per timestamp (writing my_metric_name[5m])

Can u explain to me then what I dont understand here about how these 2 vectors look/work?

Thank you!

4
  • 10
    Did you read promlabs.com/blog/2020/06/18/the-anatomy-of-a-promql-query yet? Commented Jul 2, 2021 at 12:36
  • 1
    will do, thanks. didnt see it when i looked for vectors explanations
    – small
    Commented Jul 2, 2021 at 12:53
  • 2
    Does that actually answer the question? I'm guessing the graph simply uses many instant vectors. Certainly the description quoted on the prometheus web page is confusing and incomplete.
    – MikeKulls
    Commented Sep 13, 2021 at 22:56
  • when showing a graph, the Prometheus web page adds start, end, and step implicitly if you open the debug window observing the request. so you input Instant vector and the server returns Range vector. if you input Range vector, it would be range of range and illegal.
    – exudong
    Commented Jul 18, 2023 at 3:20

10 Answers 10

30

Summary from


  • What’s a Vector?
    • Since Prometheus is a timeseries database, all data is in the context of some timestamp. The series that maps a timestamp to recorded data is called a timeseries
    • a set of related timeseries is called a vector
    • Ex.
      • http_requests_total is a vector representing the total number of http requests received by a service
      • http_requests_total{code="200"} http_requests_total refers to the entire set of timeseries that are named that. And by appending a {code="200"}, we’re selecting a subset.
  • Types of Vectors
    • Instant vector - a set of timeseries where every timestamp maps to a single data point at that “instant”
      • Imagine evaluating the expression http_requests_total at a given timestamp. http_requests_total is an instant vector selector that selects the latest sample for any time series with the metric name http_requests_total. More specifically, "latest" means "at most 5 minutes old and not stale", relative to the evaluation timestamp. So this selector will only yield a result for series that have a sample at most 5 minutes prior to the evaluation timestamp, and where the last sample before the evaluation timestamp is not a stale marker (an explicit way of marking a series as terminating at a certain time in the Prometheus TSDB).
    • Range vector - a set of timeseries where every timestamp maps to a “range” of data points, recorded some duration into the past.
      • Range vector is mostly used for graphs, where you want to show a PromQL expression over a given time range. A range query works exactly like many completely independent instant queries that are evaluated at subsequent time steps over a given range of time. Of course, this is highly optimized under the hood and Prometheus doesn't actually run many independent instant queries in this case.
  • Differences
    • Instant vectors can be charted; Range vectors cannot. This is because charting something involves displaying a data point on the y-axis for every timestamp on the x-axis. Instant vectors have a single value for every timestamp, while range vectors have many of them. For the purpose of charting a metric, it is undefined1 how to show multiple data points for a single timestamp in a timeseries.
    • Instant vectors can be compared and have arithmetic performed on them; Range vectors cannot. This is also due to the way comparison and arithmetic operators are defined. For every timestamp, if we have multiple values, we don’t know how to add1 or compare them to another timeseries of a similar nature.
    • Range Vectors for counters. We take the instant vector and append our duration [15m]. This part is called the range selector and it transforms the instant vector into a range vector. We then use a function like increase which effectively subtracts the data point at the start of the range from the one at the end. increase(http_requests_total{code="200",handler="/api/v1/query"}[15m]) represent it is the increase in the total number of requests over the past fifteen minutes
0
23

VictoriaMetrics author here. This is Prometheus-like monitoring system, which supports PromQL-like query language - MetricsQL.

The instant vector and range vector are indeed confusing terms in Prometheus. That's why these terms are avoided in VictoriaMetrics docs. Prometheus query language - PromQL - provides various functions, which can be divided into two groups:

  • Functions, which accept only instant vector. Such functions can be split into the following subgroups:
  • Functions, which accept only range vector. VictoriaMetrics names such functions as rollup functions, since they calculate the result based on input time series samples over the given lookbehind window specified in square brackets (aka sliding window). For example, rate(http_requests_total[5m]) calculates the average per-second increase rate for http_requests_total time series over the last 5 minutes.

From user's perspective the only difference between instant vector and range vector is that range vector is constructed from the instant vector by adding a lookbehind window in square brackets. For example, http_requests_total is an instant vector, while http_requests_total[5m] is a range vector. I'd say that the range vector syntax is just a syntactic sugar for rollup functions in PromQL. E.g. rate(m[d]) could be written as rate(m, d), e.g. the lookbehind window d could be passed as a separate argument to rollup functions.

6

I had similar question when I started learning Prometheus.

First thing to note, Prometheus expression language evaluates to four types.

  1. strings
  2. scalars
  3. instant vectors
  4. range vectors

(Instant vectors vs range vectors is very well explained in the resources I have linked below.)

Prometheus HTTP API's have two types,

  1. instant queries - API returns single value for the given evaluation time
  2. range queries - API returns multiple values based on time range and step

When querying through the Prometheus UI, results can be represented as either table or graph.

If you inspect the API call made from the Prometheus UI, you will notice that

  • queries displaying data in the table will hit the instant query endpoint
  • queries displaying data in the graph will hit the range query endpoint

This results in four combinations:

Query returning instant vector (via instant query API endpoint) enter image description here

Query returning instant vector (via range query API endpoint)

When we switch from table to graph view, Prometheus UI calls range query endpoint. Range query endpoint is essentially just syntactic sugar for running a series of instant queries. This endpoint makes it easy to visualize/graph time series.

If the range query endpoint didn't exist, multiple instant query calls would have to be made in order to generate a graph for a certain time period.

enter image description here

step (seconds) in the API call decide how many values should be fetched. (obviously the highest possible resolution here depends on the scrape interval). step=2 means between those two timestamps please give us a value for every second.

Query returning range vector (via instant query API endpoint)

enter image description here

Query returning range vector (via range query API endpoint)

Fails with error "Error executing query: invalid expression type "range vector" for range query, must be Scalar or instant Vector "

enter image description here

You can't directly graph a range vector output, since it would produce multiple output points for each series at each resolution step in the graph. Also, it's not guaranteed that every element in a vector will have the same number of samples for a given range.

Resources to learn

To learn more on this, refer below resources that I found extremely useful

5

You need to get familiar with two other related terms:

  • Instant query: when you query Prometheus for result of an expression on a single timestamp. e.g. for alerting.
  • Range query: when you query Prometheus for an expression with start and end timestamps. e.g. for graphing in Grafana.

So your expression can have a number of instant and range vectors in it, and be sent to Prometheus as an instant or range query.

1
  • 2
    no examples given Commented May 23, 2023 at 16:37
5
  • instant vector - returns a single value with a single timestamp. Example is just plain node_procs_running. It returns lets say value 5 timestamped from 9:00 clock sharp. You do not concern yourself with time range at this point, prometheus or grafana will pick metric's values one by one depending on time range settings that are a layer above this vector concept. You know.. like switching in graphana dashboard from last 24h to last 7 days.

  • range vector - returns multiple values for a single timestamp. This is used in query functions like avg_over_time() or last_over_time().

    A bit useless example of a query that returns range vector is node_procs_running[10m]. It returns multiple values collected in between 8:50 and 9:00, but this whole collection is timestamped as 9:00 clock sharp metric. This can't be put to graph.

    On it's own a range vector is useless, it comes to play when trying to use functions that require those multiple datapoints info. Actual example of use of range vector would be changes(node_procs_running[10m]). Now the function gets info in format it requires, it looks at those previous 10m of data preceding timestamps and outputs the number of times the metric changed. This now can be graphed as its a single value and it goes as 9:00 timestamped datapoint.

https://prometheus.io/docs/prometheus/latest/querying/functions/

4

Consider two time series with the same metric name foo but different labels:

enter image description here

In Prometheus terminology:

  • Each of x1, x2, ..., y1, y2, ... together with its corresponding timestamp is called a sample.
  • Samples within each blue box (v1, ..., v5) represent an instant vector.
  • Samples within each red box (R3, R4, R5) represent a range vector (e.g. foo[3m], assuming samples are scraped per minute):
    • R3 = [v1, v2, v3]
    • R4 = [v2, v3, v4]
    • R5 = [v3, v4, v5]

range vector is more like a matrix, which might have contributed to the confusion.

It's obvious that a collection of instant vectors can be plotted, which would be two lines (x1, x2, ... and y1, y2 ...) for the above example, while a collection of range vectors (matrices), which forms a 3D tensor, cannot be plotted directly unless each row within each range vector is aggregated into a scalar. Such aggregation is what a function like rate does.

1
  • Thanks for the illustrated explanation!
    – plinyar
    Commented May 31 at 8:52
3

Instant vector - a set of time series containing a single sample for each time series, all sharing the same timestamp

Range vector - a set of time series containing a range of data

This is quite an abstract excerpt of the Prometheus documentation. Before we understand this, we first must understand what a times series means.

Time series - In Prometheus we work with metric types such as counters, gauges etc. It is important to understand that Prometheus creates a separate instance of that particular metric type for each possible combination of labels. These instances are called a time series.

All this is much better understandable by an example:

Example instant vector

There are 3 time series in this example which differ by the labels. The metric name "http_server_requests_seconds_count" is the same for all of them. Every time series has a single sample (7, 8 and 4). All time series are sharing the same timestamp (here it is the current time) enter image description here

Example range vector

The query was modified with the range [30s]. Still 3 time series, but every time series contains now a range of data at multiple times. instant vector

1
  • I see the value of the metric with no timestamp : to answer this first, a time stamp is not shown in the results table, since we have the "Evaluation time" field already present Image for reference
  • Range vector seems more logical as it has values per timestamp : range vectors works between a range of 2 timestamps, so when you apply the [5m] to your metric, it take now-5m of the range and displays the results in that time frame, and since there maybe more than 1 results in that time frame the timestamp is shown.

This video helped me understand this very same question, hope it helps you too.

https://training.robustperception.io/courses/204997/lectures/3156025

1
  • The video is not reachable by this link any more.
    – Izydorr
    Commented Sep 25, 2022 at 17:47
0

This is my understanding First of all, what is a series?


A distinct metric name and zero or more label combination(s) when executed result in 1 or more series. When the prometheus query is executed without a time selector, it means that it is executed for the current instant/timestamp or even a particular timestamp.

This will result in every series having a single value for a particular timestamp (current timestamp by default) This query result (which is a collection of series) is of type instant vector, because it contains the series with single value for every timestamp.

When the prometheus query is executed with a time selector, it means that it is executed for last x time units. This can result in every series having more than one value for any timestamp in the range mentioned. While this is expected, what happens to graphs?

Each series is represented by a color in the graph. And since a series can have multiple values for a given timestamp, this query result cannot be graphed. Range vectors simply cannot be graphed.

0

tl;dr You're conflating instant/range vectors with instant/range queries.


These are 3 time series for the same metric (container_memory_rss):

time (min)                                   0     1     2     3     4     5     now
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"} 34    55    32    34    45    34
container_memory_rss{container="grafana"}   467   647   654   564   563   455
container_memory_rss{container="mysql"}     9744  9394  6345  8895  8867  9645

Instant vectors and range vectors are both PromQL expression types (the others being strings, scalars, and native histograms (experimental). Whenever you evaluate PromQL expressions like container_memory_rss or 5-2, those expression evaluates to one of these types (instant vector and scalar, respectively).

When the PromQL expression is a time series selector (e.g. container_memory_rss), Prometheus will take a single sample from each time series that is closest to the evaluation time, giving you an instant vector. So an instant vector may look like this:

container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"} 34
container_memory_rss{container="grafana"}   455
container_memory_rss{container="mysql"}     9645

When the PromQL expression is a time series selector with a time duration (e.g. container_memory_rss[3m]), Prometheus will take all the samples from each time series within the specified duration, giving you a range vector that may look like this:

container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"} 34    45    34
container_memory_rss{container="grafana"}   564   563   455
container_memory_rss{container="mysql"}     8895  8867  9645

Now, let's talk about instant queries and range queries.

Instant queries show the result of a PromQL expression evaluated at a single point in time (called the 'evaluation timestamp'), whereas range queries show the result of a PromQL expression evaluated at multiple, discrete steps (called a 'resolution step') between a start and end time.

A instant query of a PromQL expression that evaluates to an instant vector may look like this:

container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"} 34
container_memory_rss{container="grafana"}   455
container_memory_rss{container="mysql"}     9645

This is typically shown as a table (below is a screenshot from Grafana):

Grafana interface showing Prometheus data, evaluating an instant vector using an instant query, and displayed as a table

A range query of a PromQL expression that evaluates to an instant vector may look like this:

t0:
container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"} 34
container_memory_rss{container="grafana"}   467
container_memory_rss{container="mysql"}     9744
t2:
container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"} 32
container_memory_rss{container="grafana"}   654
container_memory_rss{container="mysql"}     6345
t4:
container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"} 45
container_memory_rss{container="grafana"}   563
container_memory_rss{container="mysql"}     8867

This is typically visualized as a line graph, but to demonstrate the point more clearly, here it is shown as a points:

Grafana interface showing Prometheus data, evaluating an instant vector using an range query, and displayed as a graph

Each vertical slice on the graph is a single evaluation of the PromQL expression at that point in time. In effect, a range query is many instant queries stitched together.

A instant query of a PromQL expression that evaluates to an range vector may look like this:

container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"} 34    45    34
container_memory_rss{container="grafana"}   564   563   455
container_memory_rss{container="mysql"}     8895  8867  9645

It can be plotted on Grafana like this:

enter image description here

But note that each point in this plot is not multiple evaluations of a PromQL expression that each produced an instant query, but a single evaluation of a PromQL expression that produces a range query containing multiple samples. Prometheus just looks back for 5 minutes (in this example) at the instant the PromQL expression is evaluated.

A range query of a PromQL expression that evaluates to an range vector may look like this:

t3:
container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"} 55    32    34
container_memory_rss{container="grafana"}   647   654   564
container_memory_rss{container="mysql"}     9394  6345  8895
t4:
container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"} 32    34    45
container_memory_rss{container="grafana"}   654   564   563
container_memory_rss{container="mysql"}     6345  8895  8867
t5:
container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"} 34    45    34
container_memory_rss{container="grafana"}   564   563   455
container_memory_rss{container="mysql"}     8895  8867  9645

Trying to plot this on Grafana will give the error:

bad_data: invalid parameter "query": invalid expression type "range vector" for range query, must be Scalar or instant Vector

enter image description here

This may be confusing because, to us, a range vector contains a number of samples and we can logically plot those samples on a graph. However, Prometheus treats the range vector as a single value, just like a single scalar (232). Prometheus doesn't care that a range vector contains samples; that is opaque to Prometheus.

For range queries, for each resolution step, each time series must provide only a single data point.

Therefore, another way to think of it is: given that each time series within a range vector contains multiple samples, if Prometheus were to try to plot it, how do you plot multiple sample values as a single point? Or - how can it plot container_memory_rss{container="fluentbit"}55 32 34 as a single point? It can't.

To visualize a range vector as a range query, you must do some processing on the range vector to turn it into an instant vector. For example, you can use the max_over_time range function that returns the maximum value of all samples in the range vector, and use that as the value for the time series at each resolution step.

enter image description here


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