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I've got a data frame with column names like 'AH_AP' and 'AH_AS'.

Essentially all i want to do is swap the part before the underscore and the part after the underscore so that the column headers are 'AP_AH' and 'AS_AH'.

I can do that if the elements are in a list, but i've no idea how to get that to apply to column names.

My solution if it were a list goes like this:

columns = ['AH_AP','AS_AS']

def rejig_col_names():
        elements_of_header = columns.split('_')
        new_title = elements_of_header[-1] + "_" + elements_of_header[0]
        return new_title

i'm guessing i need to apply this to something like the below, but i've no idea how, or how to reference a single column within df.columns:

df.columns = df.columns.map()

Any help appreciated. Thanks :)

3

You can do it this way:

Input:

df = pd.DataFrame(data=[['1','2'], ['3','4']], columns=['AH_PH', 'AH_AS'])
print(df)  

  AH_PH AH_AS
0     1     2
1     3     4

Output:

df.columns = df.columns.str.split('_').str[::-1].str.join('_')
print(df)

  PH_AH AS_AH
0     1     2
1     3     4

Explained:

  • Use string accessor and the split method on '_'

  • Then using the str accessor with index slicing reversing, [::-1], you can reverse the order of the list

  • Lastly, using the string accessor and join, we can concatenate the list back together again.

1
  • That's brilliant thank you. The part i was really missing was .str - which i'm assuming is specifying the string element of the column header. Couldn't figure out how to refer to it. Thanks again :) Jul 8 at 14:19
2

You were almost there: you can do

df.columns = df.columns.map(rejig_col_names)

except that the function gets called with a column name as argument, so change it like this:

def rejig_col_names(col_name):
        elements_of_header = col_name.split('_')
        new_title = elements_of_header[-1] + "_" + elements_of_header[0]
        return new_title
1
  • urgh...that's so annoying - tried several versions of very similar things! Good to know i wasn't miles off though. Thanks :) Jul 9 at 7:06
1

An alternative to the other answer. Using your function and DataFrame.rename

import pandas as pd


def rejig_col_names(columns):
    elements_of_header = columns.split('_')
    new_title = elements_of_header[-1] + "_" + elements_of_header[0]
    return new_title


data = {
    'A_B': [1, 2, 3],
    'C_D': [4, 5, 6],
}

df = pd.DataFrame(data)
df.rename(rejig_col_names, axis='columns', inplace=True)
print(df)
1
  • FYI... my solution using DataFrame.rename, df.rename(columns=lambda x: '_'.join(x.split('_')[::-1])) Jul 8 at 15:28
1

str.replace is also an option via swapping capture groups:

Sample input borrowed from ScottBoston

df = pd.DataFrame(data=[['1', '2'], ['3', '4']], columns=['AH_PH', 'AH_AS'])

Then Capture everything before and after the '_' and swap capture group 1 and 2.

df.columns = df.columns.str.replace(r'^(.*)_(.*)$', r'\2_\1', regex=True)
  PH_AH AS_AH
0     1     2
1     3     4
2
  • I don't use regex nearly enough. I need to interalize using capture groups. +1 Jul 8 at 15:25
  • 1
    They come in handy for sure. Although sometimes they cause more of a problem than they solve. Your solution is certainly more flexible in reversing all elements, this will get finicky with different numbers of '_' breaks, depending on the desired behaviour. Jul 8 at 15:32

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