3

I have two components with similar props, but there is a crucial difference. One component, called TabsWithState takes only a single prop tabs, which is an array of objects of the following shape:

interface ItemWithState {
  name: string;
  active: boolean;
}

interface WithStateProps {
  tabs: ItemWithState[];
};

Another similar component, called TabsWithRouter, requires the item shape to be different:

interface ItemWithRouter {
  name: string;
  path: string;
}

interface WithRouterProps {
  tabs: ItemWithRouter[];
};

I am trying to create a generic component Tabs, which would account for both scenarios. I want to be able to write a <Tabs /> component, where if a withRouter prop is passed, the tabs property must be of type ItemWithRouter[]. But if no withRouter prop is passed, it must of type ItemWithState[]. Also, if withRouter is passed, Tabs should also accept an optional baseUrl prop.

I tried creating a discriminating union type, like this:

type WithStateProps = {
  withRouter?: never;
  baseUrl?: never;
  tabs: ItemWithState[];
};

type WithRouterProps = {
  withRouter: boolean;
  baseUrl?: string;
  tabs: ItemWithRouter[];
};

type TabsProps = WithStateProps | WithRouterProps;

In my generic Tabs component, I want to render TabsWithRouter if withRouter is present, and TabsWithState if withRouter is not present:

const Tabs = (props: TabsProps) => {
  const { withRouter } = props;
  if (withRouter) {
    return <TabsWithRouter {...props} />;
  }
  return <TabsWithState {...props} />;
};

I initially tried to define TabsWithRouter and TabsWithState as being function components that accept WithRouterProps and WithStateProps, respectively:

const TabsWithRouter: React.FC<WithRouterProps> = (props: WithRouterProps) => { ... }
const TabsWithState: React.FC<WithStateProps> = (props: WithStateProps) => { ... }

But I get the error Types of property 'withRouter' are incompatible. Type 'undefined' is not assignable to type 'boolean'., as can be seen in this ts playground

So I tried instead to type TabsWithRouter and TabsWithState as accepting TabsProps as their props:

const TabsWithRouter: React.FC<TabsProps> = (props: TabsProps) => {
  const { tabs } = props;
  console.log(tabs[0].path)
  return null
}
const TabsWithState: React.FC<TabsProps> = (props: TabsProps) => {
  const { tabs } = props;
  console.log(tabs[0].active)
  return null
}

But in this case, trying to access tabs[x].path or tabs[x].active gives me the error Property 'active' does not exist on type 'ItemWithState | ItemWithRouter'. Property 'active' does not exist on type 'ItemWithRouter', as can be seen in this ts playground.

Interestingly, in both cases, when I actually try to use the component, the props are behaving correctly, as can be seen in some examples at the bottom of either ts playground.

I feel like I'm close, but I'm struggling to get these discriminating union types to behave in the way that I want so that typescript stops erroring. I've read many posts on here asking similar questions, but I can't seem to apply them to what is going wrong in my scenario.

Edit:

As per request, here is my tsconfig.json:

{
  "extends": "./tsconfig.paths.json",
  "compilerOptions": {
    "baseUrl": "src",
    "target": "es5",
    "lib": [
      "dom",
      "dom.iterable",
      "esnext"
    ],
    "allowJs": true,
    "skipLibCheck": true,
    "esModuleInterop": true,
    "allowSyntheticDefaultImports": true,
    "strict": true,
    "forceConsistentCasingInFileNames": true,
    "module": "esnext",
    "moduleResolution": "node",
    "resolveJsonModule": true,
    "isolatedModules": true,
    "noEmit": true,
    "jsx": "react-jsx",
    "types": [
      "cypress",
      "cypress-file-upload",
      "jest"
    ],
    "downlevelIteration": true,
    "noFallthroughCasesInSwitch": true
  },
  "include": [
    "src"
  ]
}

Edit2

this ts playground shows that captain-yossarian's solution doesn't enforce the kinds of types I'm looking to enforce on the Tabs component

1

4 Answers 4

4

How about something simple like this... giving TypeScript a hint using as WithRouterProps or as WithStateProps as appropriate?

const Tabs = (props: TabsProps) => {
  const { withRouter } = props;
  if (withRouter !== undefined) {
    return <TabsWithRouter {...props as WithRouterProps} />;
  }
  return <TabsWithState {...props as WithStateProps} />;
};
1
  • 1
    I ended up doing this just to get typescript to stop complaining. Its a nice solution and still enforces discrimination types as needed in this scenario. It does feel like a bit of a hack. I'll leave this unanswered for a day or so in hopes of inspiring someone to come up with a more 'proper' answer - if not, I'll mark it as the answer. Thank you! Jul 8, 2021 at 22:07
3

Control flow of aliased conditions is available only since ts@4.4. So, using destructured withRouter variable doesn't carry any type information when used inside if statement before ts@4.4.

Then there is a subtle issue in your code. Your withRouter prop has type boolean and here:

const Tabs = (props: TabsProps) => {
  const { withRouter } = props;
  if (withRouter) { // withRouter === true
    return <TabsWithRouter {...props} />;
  }
  return <TabsWithState {...props} />;
};

You're narrowing it's type to true not to boolean (true | false).

Another issue is optional types always bring undefined value into the union. Thus you have to explicitly check for such a case. This check simultaneously check for explicit 'undefined' value or the case when !('withRouter' in props):

const Tabs = (props: TabsProps) => {
  if (props.withRouter === undefined) {
      return <TabsWithState {...props} />;
  }  
  
  return <TabsWithRouter {...props} />;
};

playground link

Since ts@4.4 you can use desctructured withRouter as aliased condition:

const Tabs = (props: TabsProps) => {
  const { withRouter } = props
  if (withRouter === undefined) {
      return <TabsWithState {...props} />;
  }  
  
  return <TabsWithRouter {...props} />;
};

playground check

7
  • Interesting...my project is using 4.2.4. I switched your example's version to 4.2.3, and theystill work in the playground, but not in my project. In my project, I still get errors about Types of property 'withRouter' are incompatible. Type 'undefined' is not assignable to type 'boolean'.. Not sure what I'm missing Jul 9, 2021 at 17:34
  • Can you post contents of your tsconfig.json file?
    – aleksxor
    Jul 9, 2021 at 17:59
  • I added it to the question Jul 9, 2021 at 18:03
  • I assume tsconfig.paths.json does not contain any significant compiler options?
    – aleksxor
    Jul 9, 2021 at 18:24
  • codesandbox.io/s/nostalgic-moore-x637f?file=/src/App.tsx still cannot reproduce with exact ts version and the same tsconfig.json.
    – aleksxor
    Jul 9, 2021 at 18:35
1

Because both union have withROuter prop, it is hard for TS to distinguish them.

I think union worth refactoring.

UPDATE - added overloading

import React, { FC } from 'react'

interface ItemWithState {
  name: string;
  active: boolean;
}


interface ItemWithRouter {
  name: string;
  path: string;
}


type WithStateProps = {
  tabs: ItemWithState[];
};

type WithRouterProps = {
  withRouter: true;
  baseUrl?: string;
  tabs: ItemWithRouter[];
};

type TabsProps = WithStateProps | WithRouterProps;

const hasProperty = <Obj, Prop extends string>(obj: Obj, prop: Prop)
  : obj is Obj & Record<Prop, unknown> =>
  Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, prop);


const TabsWithRouter: FC<WithRouterProps> = (props: WithRouterProps) => null
const TabsWithState: FC<WithStateProps> = (props: WithStateProps) => null

type Overloading =
  & ((props: WithStateProps) => JSX.Element)
  & ((props: WithRouterProps) => JSX.Element)

const Tabs: Overloading = (props: TabsProps) => {
  if (hasProperty(props, 'withRouter')) {
    return <TabsWithRouter {...props} />;
  }
  return <TabsWithState {...props} />;
};

const Test = () => {
  return (
    <div>
      <Tabs // With correct state props
        tabs={[{ name: "myname", active: true }]}
      />
      <Tabs // With incorrect state props
        baseUrl="something"
        tabs={[{ name: "myname", active: true }]}
      />
      <Tabs // WIth correct router props
        withRouter
        tabs={[{ name: "myname", path: "somepath" }]}
      />
      <Tabs // WIth correct router props
        withRouter
        baseUrl="someurl"
        tabs={[{ name: "myname", path: "somepath" }]}
      />
      <Tabs // WIth incorrect router props
        withRouter
        tabs={[{ name: "myname", active: true }]}
      />
    </div>
  );

Now, TS is able to figure out where is withState and where is withRouter

Playground

Btw, both this and this questions might be interesting for you. TS does not play well with destructuring in term of working with unions

4
  • Your solution doesn't appear to throw the proper errors when the props are passed incorrectly to an instance of <Tabs /> - ts playground link is too long for a comment, but if you copy the Test component from my examples into the end of your example, you'll see there are no proper errors thrown for incorrect scenarios. In my actual project, feeding a tabs object to <Tabs /> that is of type ItemWithRouter[] without a withRouter property shows no error, and a tabs type of ItemWithState[] with withRouter does not error either Jul 9, 2021 at 17:25
  • @SethLutske do you mean Tabs component instead Test? I'm bit confused. Why do I need to use your component since I fixed it? COuld you please provide a link in your question? Jul 9, 2021 at 18:38
  • I added a link at the end of my question, edit 2. Ultimately the purpose of all this is to enforce certain props on the Tabs component. When I write <Tabs withRouter tabs={sometabs} />, someTabs will have to contain a path property on each entry. Your solution doesn't seem to be enforcing that, or vice versa Jul 9, 2021 at 18:44
  • Its working! This is another nice solution. I wish I could award two answers Jul 9, 2021 at 20:45
0

You could define a single TabsProps type:

type TabsProps = {
  withRouter: boolean;
  baseUrl?: string;
  tabs: ItemWithRouter[] | ItemWithState[];
};

and use it in your interface specific components like:

const TabsWithRouter: React.FC<TabsProps> = (props: TabsProps) => {
  const tabs = props.tabs as ItemWithRouter[];
  return (
    <div>
      <h3>TabsWithRouter Path: {tabs[0].path}</h3>
    </div>
  );
};

const TabsWithState: React.FC<TabsProps> = (props: TabsProps) => {
  const tabs = props.tabs as ItemWithState[];
  return (
    <div>
      <h3>TabsWithState Path: {tabs[0].active ? "true" : "false"}</h3>
    </div>
  );
};

https://codesandbox.io/s/vigilant-ptolemy-s2r3n

1
  • ...mmm, no. This does not work. For example, if I create a Tabs component with withRouter={true}, I do not get an error when trying to give it a tabs property that has active entries in each tab. See example here. This does not help me enforce one type of tab object vs another based on the status or existence of the withRouter prop. The tabs type can't just be either/or willy-nilly, it has to be based on the value for withRouter. Thank you for putting in the time though Jul 8, 2021 at 22:24

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