4

I need to send GET and POST requests to many endpoints.

For example, GET | POST Fruit List, GET | POST Weather List...

Not on one page, they are divided(Browser Route). ex) Fruit Page, Weather Page...

I'd like to know how to make a custom react hook in this situation.

I searched a lot, but all the writing was based on a single api endpoint.


Way 1

Create a reusable fetch function.

function useGetFetch(url){
    const response = await fetch(url, ...
    return response.json()
}

function usePostFetch(url){
    const response = await fetch(url, ...
    return response.json()
}

Way 2

Create function one for each.

function getFruitList(){
    const response = await fetch('/fruit', ...
}

function postFruitList(){
    const response = await fetch('/fruit', ...
}

function getWeatherList(){
    const response = await fetch('/weather', ...
}

function postWeatherList(){
    const response = await fetch('/weather', ...
}
4
  • 1
    In my opinion, even though the second way may seem less DRY it will scale better and be more easily maintainable. You can create a "service layer" where we keep these various fetching functions that are called from a useEffect in the route/component in which they are needed. The first way may look nice because it is less code, but in that approach you commit to coupling all endpoints together through this path for all time, which might present problems down the road. Jul 9, 2021 at 13:07
  • 1
    what I did one time was wrap the fetch in order to put options I had to put. if you need user info and use context api, using a hook lets you use the user from context easily.
    – Noriller
    Jul 9, 2021 at 13:10
  • @AlexanderNied Based on your opinion, I think the more endpoints there are, the more manageable way2. Thank you for your opinion. Jul 9, 2021 at 13:11
  • You are welcome-- combining this with @Noriller 's approach of abstracting the actual fetching bits into a hook would probably give you the best of both worlds (reusability of the common pieces without needless coupling). Good luck, happy coding! Jul 9, 2021 at 13:13

1 Answer 1

6

I read about Kent's useAsync hook once and I think with your second approach will fit well. Here is the whole code of what goes into making a re-usable useAsync hook with star-wars API example :-

import "./styles.css";
import React, { useEffect } from "react";
export default function App() {
  const {
    run: starShipExec,
    status: starshipStatus,
    data: starshipData,
    error: startshipError
  } = useAsync({ status: "idle" });
  const {
    run: peopleExec,
    status: peopleStatus,
    data: peopleData,
    error: peopleError
  } = useAsync({ status: "idle" });

  useEffect(() => {
    starShipExec(getStarships());
    peopleExec(getPeople());
  }, [starShipExec, peopleExec]);

  return (
    <div className="App">
      Startships
      <ul>
        {starshipData?.results.map((res) => (
          <li>{res.name}</li>
        ))}
      </ul>
      People
      <ul>
        {peopleData?.results.map((res) => (
          <li>{res.name}</li>
        ))}
      </ul>
    </div>
  );
}

async function getStarships() {
  return await fetch("https://swapi.dev/api/starships");
}

async function getPeople() {
  return await fetch("https://swapi.dev/api/people");
}

function asyncReducer(_state, action) {
  switch (action.type) {
    case "pending": {
      return { status: "pending", data: null, error: null };
    }
    case "resolved": {
      return { status: "resolved", data: action.data, error: null };
    }
    case "rejected": {
      return { status: "rejected", data: null, error: action.error };
    }
    default: {
      throw new Error(`Unhandled action type: ${action.type}`);
    }
  }
}

function useSafeDispatch(dispatch) {
  const mountedRef = React.useRef(false);
  React.useLayoutEffect(() => {
    mountedRef.current = true;
    return () => (mountedRef.current = false);
  }, []);

  const safeDispatch = React.useCallback(
    (...args) => {
      mountedRef.current && dispatch(...args);
    },
    [dispatch]
  );
  return safeDispatch;
}

function useAsync({ status }) {
  const [state, unsafeDispatch] = React.useReducer(asyncReducer, {
    status: status,
    data: null,
    error: null
  });
  const dispatch = useSafeDispatch(unsafeDispatch);

  const run = React.useCallback(
    (promise) => {
      if (!promise) {
        return;
      }
      dispatch({ type: "pending" });
      promise
        .then((data) => data.json())
        .then((data) => {
          dispatch({ type: "resolved", data });
        })
        .catch((error) => {
          dispatch({ type: "rejected", error });
        });
    },
    [dispatch]
  );

  return { ...state, run };
}

The part I like is returning the run function into which we can pass the any promise and the rest the hook manages. It gives the user of the API more control of what to execute.

Here is a working codesandbox :-

Edit useAsync-star-wars

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