13

I have a struct that has 20 fields:

struct StructA {
    value1: i32,
    value2: i32,
    // ...
    value19: i32,
    day: chrono::NaiveDate,
}

I'd like to impl Default trait for StructA. I tried to add #[derive(Default)] to the struct, but chrono::NaiveDate doesn't implement Default.

I then tried to implement Default for StructA:

impl Default for StructA {
    fn default() -> Self {
        Self {
            value1: Default::default(),
            value2: Default::default(),
            // ...
            value19: Default::default(),
            day: chrono::NaiveDate::from_ymd(2021, 1, 1),
        }
    }
}

This code works fine, but the parts of value1 through value19 are redundant. Is there a solution with less code?

  • I defined StructA to deserialize JSON data via serde-json so I can't change the struct's definition.
  • A value of day: chrono::NaiveDate is always given from JSON data, so I want to avoid day: Option<chrono::NaiveDate>.
4
  • I would prefer smaller structs to manage, inner pattern can be applied also : play.rust-lang.org/… Jul 12, 2021 at 11:32
  • @ÖmerErden Yes. Your comment is a better way. But now, I defined the StructA for serialize/deserialize existing JSON data. So I can't change the structure of StructA.
    – tomlla
    Jul 12, 2021 at 12:16
  • You can always implement custom serializer/deserializer to represent your data in a different structure, actually If you are using serde #[serde(flatten)] would easily solve your problem with the inner pattern. Jul 12, 2021 at 12:30
  • 1
    I didn't know #[serde(flatten)]. Thank you.
    – tomlla
    Jul 12, 2021 at 14:13

3 Answers 3

16

The derivative crate makes this kind of thing a breeze:

#[derive(Derivative)]
#[derivative(Default)]
struct StructA {
    value1: i32,
    value2: i32,
    // ...
    value19: i32,
    #[derivative(Default(value = "NaiveDate::from_ymd(2021, 1, 1)"))]
    day: NaiveDate,
}

If you want to avoid external crates, your options are:

  • the approach you already used, with the downside that you must name all the fields. Also note that you don't need to repeat Default::default() for each numeric field, a simple 0 will work as well.
  • make day an Option and derive Default, with the downside that it will default to None, bear a run-time cost, and you'll have to unwrap() to access it.
  • make day a newtype that wraps NaiveDate and implements Default to set it to the desired value, with the downside that you'll need to access the NaiveDate through a (zero-cost) field or method.
3

That's a rather dirty trick, but you can wrap your date in an Option, and it has an implementation of Default. Then you won't need to implement Default on your own, you can derive it. To keep the same semantics of StructA::default() you'll need to write your own method (luckily Rust allows to define default() method besides already derived Default::default()) Playground

use chrono;

#[derive(Debug, Default)]
struct StructA {
  value1: i32,
  value2: i32,
  value19: i32,
  day: Option<chrono::NaiveDate>,
}

impl StructA {
  fn default() -> Self {
    let mut instance: Self = Default::default();
    instance.day = Some(chrono::NaiveDate::from_ymd(2021, 1, 1));
    instance
  }
}

fn main() {
    println!("{:?}", StructA::default());
    // StructA { value1: 0, value2: 0, value19: 0, day: Some(2021-01-01) }
}

Downsides of this version:

  • Need to .unwrap() the date everywhere it's used
  • Two methods with same name default, but one is Self::default which fills the date as I implemented and the other is Default::default which fills the date with None, you'll need to be careful which you call (calling StructA::default() invokes Self::default())

EDIT. Please be careful with this answer (details in the comments by @user4815162342)

In short - the last downside of having two different .default() methods in one type is dangerous in generic methods with T: Default arguments, because in this case will be called Default::default(), which initializes the day field to None. The worst part of this effect, is that compiler won't ever warn you about it, thus forcing you to spend your time debugging in case of a bug.

There's one similar approach suggested by @ÖmerErden, where you can again wrap the date into another type, to which you implement Default on your own. This will ensure that your field will always be initialized, but still forces you to somehow "unwrap" the value. In case of wrapping NaiveDate into a tuple struct, you can unwrap as simply as instance.day.0 or implement Deref to this wrapper and unwrap with *instance.day

use chrono;
use std::ops::Deref;

#[derive(Debug)]
struct NaiveDateWrapper(chrono::NaiveDate);

impl Default for NaiveDateWrapper {
    fn default() -> Self {
        Self(chrono::NaiveDate::from_ymd(2021, 1, 1))
    }
}

impl Deref for NaiveDateWrapper {
    type Target = chrono::NaiveDate;
    fn deref(&self) -> &Self::Target {
        &self.0
    }
}

#[derive(Debug, Default)]
struct StructA {
  value1: i32,
  value2: i32,
  value19: i32,
  day: NaiveDateWrapper,
}

fn main() {
    let v = StructA::default();
    println!("{:?}", v.day.0);  
    println!("{:?}", *v.day);
}
4
  • Nice idea, also Wrapper struct can be used to get rid of unwrap : NaiveDateWrapper(chrono::NaiveDate) Jul 12, 2021 at 11:35
  • 1
    This trick will fail badly (and silently) when StructA is used in generic code where T: Default is required. It will silently invoke Default::default() and fail to initialize the struct correctly. Jul 12, 2021 at 11:40
  • 1
    @user4815162342 can't agree more, but can be partially solved with what @Ömer Erden suggests - wrap the date type in some tuple struct and implement Default for it Jul 12, 2021 at 11:47
  • That idea is probably the most elegant approach using just the standard library. I encourage you to edit your answer to feature it more prominently. I didn't downvote because I have a "competing" answer, but the dirty-trick solution from the answer is really dangerous in the face of generic code, and generic code is probably the reason the OP wants to implement Default in the first place. Jul 12, 2021 at 12:01
0

There is another crate called Educe https://docs.rs/educe/latest/educe/#default

Some code snippets.

#[macro_use] extern crate educe;

#[derive(Educe)]
#[educe(Default)]
struct Struct {
    #[educe(Default = 1)]
    f1: u8,
    #[educe(Default = 11111111111111111111111111111)]
    f2: i128,
    #[educe(Default = 1.1)]
    f3: f64,
    #[educe(Default = true)]
    f4: bool,
    #[educe(Default = "Hi")]
    f5: &'static str,
    #[educe(Default = "Hello")]
    f6: String,
    #[educe(Default = 'M')]
    f7: char,
}

#[derive(Educe)]
#[educe(Default)]
enum Enum {
    Unit,
    #[educe(Default)]
    Tuple(
        #[educe(Default(expression = "0 + 1"))]
        u8,
        #[educe(Default(expression = "-11111111111111111111111111111 * -1"))]
        i128,
        #[educe(Default(expression = "1.0 + 0.1"))]
        f64,
        #[educe(Default(expression = "!false"))]
        bool,
        #[educe(Default(expression = "\"Hi\""))]
        &'static str,
        #[educe(Default(expression = "String::from(\"Hello\")"))]
        String,
        #[educe(Default(expression = "'M'"))]
        char,
    ),
}

#[derive(Educe)]
#[educe(Default)]
union Union {
    f1: u8,
    f2: i128,
    f3: f64,
    f4: bool,
    #[educe(Default = "Hi")]
    f5: &'static str,
    f6: char,
}

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