82

I created a new git branch B from branch A with tracking option.

Now, when A branch gets updated by few commits, I want to pull the commits to B as well, so I can keep track of it, and do not have to face big change sometimes later.

How should I approach this? Is it automatically done in git?

2
  • Is tracking branches actually add anything besides saying that branch A feeds from branch A?
    – Philip P.
    Jul 26 '11 at 20:57
  • 5
    You should rebase your branch B with A. Jun 29 '17 at 5:55
101

This is not made automatically. You have to manually merge your changes from A to B, which is pretty simple. Just switch to branch B and do

git merge A

Which will automatically merge your changes from A to B. As long as you don't have any conflicts, all of the changes in A will be marked as merged in B. A common best practices is to make daily merges, but that is dependent on the number of users/commits using your branch.

3
  • If you are talking about A being a remote branch and B being a local one, git pull is enough
    – HackerGil
    Jul 26 '11 at 21:14
  • 1
    When I do git merge A from branch B, and there is at least 1 file conflicting, there are files that appear in the changes (staged)! Then after resolving the conflict, I am forced to commit changes that were already commited. What is wrong? Aug 24 '18 at 12:42
  • 1
    git merge origin A should enhance this further May 15 '20 at 7:27
6

Here is how I got it to work.

My approach is that I am going to create a new folder, and put the below calls (in that same new folder)..so I know I have only "fresh" code on local (but "fresh" (as possible) from the remote server), and not any accidental local changes. Aka, a "new folder clean" approach. It will retrieve the 2 branches of interest (freshly/newly retrieved) to local ... and do the merge (locally). After resolutions, it can be pushed (not shown).

short version:

git checkout  feature/mychildbranch

git branch

git checkout  feature/myparentbranch

git pull

git branch

git checkout feature/mychildbranch

git branch

git merge feature/myparentbranch

longer version (explained) I'll use /* as comments */

/* first, make sure you at least have the child branch */
git checkout feature/mychildbranch


/* ok, just show the branches.  make sure at least feature/mychildbranch exists  note the "*" below says "this is the branch i am on" */
git branch
    * feature/mychildbranch
      feature/myparentbranch


/* now checkout the parent branch...note the "switched" happens automatically with the checkout */    
git checkout feature/myparentbranch
    Switched to branch 'feature/myparentbranch'
    Your branch is up to date with 'origin/feature/myparentbranch'.

/* not pull, the pull will occur on the branch you are currently on, which should be feature/myparentbranch at this point */    
git pull
    remote: Enumerating objects: 69, done.
    remote: Counting objects: 100% (55/55), done.
    remote: Compressing objects: 100% (22/22), done.
    remote: Total 22 (delta 17), reused 0 (delta 0)
    Unpacking objects: 100% (22/22), done.
    From https://mygit.hub.com
       96ae0e9..6eb0a03  feature/myparentbranch -> origin/feature/myparentbranch
        * [new branch]      feature/blah blah blah (specific to my stuff only)
       xb99638..x86db6f  master                  -> origin/master
    Updating x6ae0e9..xeb0a03
    Fast-forward
     .../somefileone.txt | 30 ++++++++++++--------
     .../somefiletwo.txt       |  7 +++--
     .../somefilethree.txt  |  6 ++--
     X files changed, Y insertions(+), Z deletions(-)
     create mode 100644 somenewfileone.txt

/* do a git branch just to show that you're on feature/myparentbranch */    
git branch
  feature/mychildbranch
* feature/myparentbranch

/* ok, now (above) you have the latest-greatest feature/myparent, lets do a checkout on the child to switch to the child */    
git checkout feature/mychildbranch
Switched to branch 'feature/mychildbranch'
Your branch is up to date with 'origin/feature/mychildbranch'.

/* another sanity check, show you're on feature/mychildbranch */
git branch
* feature/mychildbranch
  feature/myparentbranch

/* finally, the magic.  do a merge from feature/myparentbranch (which you know is local and up to date because of the voodoo above */    
git merge feature/myparentbranch
Merge made by the 'recursive' strategy.
 .../somefileone.txt | 30 ++++++++++++--------
 .../somefiletwo.txt       |  7 +++--
 .../somefilethree.txt  |  6 ++--
 X files changed, Y insertions(+), Z deletions(-)
 create mode 100644 somenewfileone.txt

If there are no conflicts, you should be where you want to be. If there are conflicts, that's a whole new SOF question/answer IMHO.

2
  • git merge origin A should this save me from going back to parent branch, making a pull there, and then coming back to child to perform rest of things May 15 '20 at 7:31
  • worked better than other answers, thanks Aug 31 at 13:09
5

Another option is to do a git fetch A and git merge A.

Blog post describing reason for doing it this way

1
  • 1
    +1 for sharing the link. I knew, there was one but couldn't remember it. Thanks!
    – eckes
    Jul 26 '11 at 21:15
5

Assuming your call to create B was git clone /path/to/server/A, you just have to do a git pull and you're done. That's how git pull works: first it fetches the changes from the upstream (the tracked branch A in your case), then it merges these changes into the branch that tracks the tracked branch (B in your case).

The Git Book and Pro Git discuss that topic in depth, so they're quite worth reading (if you're not in a hurry, read the rest of them too).

2
  • Hey, just wondering. I am not sure if I actually created branch B by cloning from A. I just created a branch git branch A with some random option I think. So, if I just do git pull, git complains that You asked me to pull without telling me which branch you want to merge with...
    – user482594
    Jul 26 '11 at 21:34
  • @user482594: pull is only needed if you want to fetch data from a remote. If you were on A and just did git checkout -b B, you can simply merge (while being on B, type git merge A).
    – eckes
    Jul 27 '11 at 4:39
3

at child branch B, we can do

git merge origin/A 

This would keep it in sync with parent's origin.

1

For merging with parents:

It is very important to run both commands:

  1. git fetch [to pull all meta data associated to branches]
  2. git merge parentBranchName

Just FYI: Now in your local history/logs you will see list of commits but this will commit your changes associated to parent branch in your local not on remote.

To see your all changes on remote like github, just execute

  1. git push
0

Add upstream Git repository

git remote add upstream <PARENT_REPOSITORY_URL>

Pull remote upstream branches

git fetch upstream

Checkout to the local branch to update

git checkout master

Merge latest changes from the upstream Git repository

git merge upstream/master

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