1

I'm attempting to turn a string into a collection of size N. My approach returns the wrong results.


(defn chop
  [s pieces]
  (let [piece-size (int (/ (count s) pieces))]
    (map #(str/join %) (partition-all piece-size s))))

(def big-str (slurp "/path/to/9065-byte-string.txt"))

(count (chop (str/join (take 100 (repeat "x"))) 100))
100

(count (chop (str/join (take 10005 (repeat "x"))) 100))
101

so with my test string that I'm trying to split into 100 pieces, I actually sometimes get 101 pieces (if pieze-size isn't an even multiple of 100). Not sure what is going on. Maybe my math is wrong on piece-size.

It works if I pad the string, but I don't want to do that.

(defn chop
  [s pieces]
  (let [pad-size (- 100 (mod (count s) pieces))
        padded (str s (str/join (take pad-size (repeat " "))))
        piece-size (int (/ (count padded) pieces))
        ]
    (println "pad-size=" pad-size)
    (println "piece-size=" piece-size)
    (map #(str/join %) (partition-all piece-size padded))))

3 Answers 3

1

Your math is wrong.

Suppose you have N items, and you want g groups. If N/g isn't an integer, you have groups with different numbers of items. If you want to spread out the difference, define like so:

(ns tst.demo.core
  (:use tupelo.core tupelo.test)
  (:require
    [tupelo.string :as str]))

(defn chop
  [s groups]
  (newline)
  (println :-----------------------------------------------------------------------------)
  (let-spy
    [N      (count s)
     r      (/ (float N) (float groups))  ; or use `quot`
     a      (int (Math/floor r))  ; size of "small" groups
     b      (inc a)               ; size of "big"   groups

     ; Solve 2 eq's in 2 unkowns
     ; xa + yb = N
     ; x  + y  = g
     x      (- (* b groups) N)   ; number of "small" groups
     y      (- groups x)         ; number of "big" groups
     N1     (* x a)  ; chars in all small groups
     N2     (* y b)  ; chars in all big groups
     >>     (assert (= N (+ N1 N2)))   ; verify calculated correctly
     chars  (vec s)
     smalls (vec (partition a (take N1 chars)))  ; or use `split-at`
     bigs   (vec (partition b (drop N1 chars)))

     result (mapv str/join
              (concat smalls bigs))
     ]
    result))

with unit tests:

(dotest
  (is= (chop "abcd" 2) ["ab" "cd"])
  (is= (chop "abcd" 3) ["a" "b" "cd"])
  (is= (chop "abcde" 3) ["a" "bc" "de"])
  (is= (chop "abcdef" 3) ["ab" "cd" "ef"])
  (is= (chop "abcdefg" 3) ["ab" "cd" "efg"])

  (let [s100 (str/join (take 100 (repeat "x")))
        s105 (str/join (take 105 (repeat "x")))

        r100 (chop s100 10)
        r105 (chop s105 10)
        ]
    (is= 10 (spyx (count r100)))
    (is= 10 (spyx (count r105)))))

with results printed like:

:-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
N => 4
r => 2.0
a => 2
b => 3
x => 2
y => 0
N1 => 4
N2 => 0
>> => nil
chars => [\a \b \c \d]
smalls => [(\a \b) (\c \d)]
bigs => []
result => ["ab" "cd"]

:-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
N => 4
r => 1.3333333333333333
a => 1
b => 2
x => 2
y => 1
N1 => 2
N2 => 2
>> => nil
chars => [\a \b \c \d]
smalls => [(\a) (\b)]
bigs => [(\c \d)]
result => ["a" "b" "cd"]

:-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
N => 5
r => 1.6666666666666667
a => 1
b => 2
x => 1
y => 2
N1 => 1
N2 => 4
>> => nil
chars => [\a \b \c \d \e]
smalls => [(\a)]
bigs => [(\b \c) (\d \e)]
result => ["a" "bc" "de"]

:-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
N => 6
r => 2.0
a => 2
b => 3
x => 3
y => 0
N1 => 6
N2 => 0
>> => nil
chars => [\a \b \c \d \e \f]
smalls => [(\a \b) (\c \d) (\e \f)]
bigs => []
result => ["ab" "cd" "ef"]

:-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
N => 7
r => 2.3333333333333335
a => 2
b => 3
x => 2
y => 1
N1 => 4
N2 => 3
>> => nil
chars => [\a \b \c \d \e \f \g]
smalls => [(\a \b) (\c \d)]
bigs => [(\e \f \g)]
result => ["ab" "cd" "efg"]

Once you have it debugged and you understand the steps, change let-spy to let and remove the other print statements.

The above is made using my favorite template project.


Update

If you don't like solving systems of equations, you could just use quot and either mod or remainder to figure out the division:

(defn chop
  [s groups]
  (let [N            (count s)
        nsmall       (quot N groups) ; size of "small" groups
        nbig         (inc nsmall) ; size of "big"   groups
        ngrp-big     (- N (* nsmall groups)) ; number of "big" groups
        ngrp-small   (- groups ngrp-big) ; number of "small" groups
        nsmall-chars (* ngrp-small nsmall) ; chars in all small groups
        [chars-small chars-large] (split-at nsmall-chars s)
        smalls       (partition nsmall chars-small)
        bigs         (partition nbig chars-large)
        result       (mapv str/join
                       (concat smalls bigs))]
    result))
1

There is no need for float operations here.

(let [batches        3
      input-sequence "abcd"
      full-batches   (mod (count input-sequence) batches)
      full-batches   (if (zero? full-batches) batches full-batches)
      batch-size     (/ (+ (count input-sequence) (- full-batches) batches) batches)]]
    (let [[a b] (split-at (* full-batches batch-size) input-sequence)]
        (map #(apply str %)
            (concat (partition batch-size a)
                (partition (dec batch-size) b)))))
=> ("ab" "c" "d")

I got batch-size formula by solving equation: enter image description here

1
  • I was torn about using systems of equations or something else. I've added an alternate solution using quot and mod. You don't need the if that way. Jul 15, 2021 at 5:55
1

Are you trying to do this?

(defn chop [s piece-count]
  (let [step (/ (count s) piece-count)]
    (->> (range (inc piece-count)) ;; <-- Enumerated split positions
         (map #(-> % (* step) double Math/round)) ;; <-- Where to split
         (partition 2 1) ;; <-- Form slice lower/upper bounds
         (map (fn [[l u]] (subs s l u)))))) ;; <-- Slice input string

(chop "Input string." 3)
;; => ("Inpu" "t str" "ing.")

The main problem with your approach is that you round off the piece size to an integer making every piece equal in length, which will not work if the string length is not divisible by the piece count. The solution is to compute fractional slice bounds first and then round them to the nearest integer where the input string will be split. This algorithm results in slices with lengths that differ by no more than 1.

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