24

I just want a c# application with a hidden main window that will process and respond to window messages.

I can create a form without showing it, and can then call Application.Run() without passing in a form, but how can I hook the created form into the message loop?

Is there another way to go about this?

Thanks in advance for any tips!

12 Answers 12

20

Excellent! That link pointed me in the right direction. This seems to work:

        Form f = new Form1();
        f.FormBorderStyle = FormBorderStyle.FixedToolWindow;
        f.ShowInTaskbar = false;
        f.StartPosition = FormStartPosition.Manual;
        f.Location = new System.Drawing.Point(-2000, -2000);
        f.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(1, 1);
        Application.Run(f);

To keep it from showing up in Alt-Tab, you need it to be a tool window. Unfortunately, this prevents it from starting minimized. But setting the start position to Manual and positioning it offscreen does the trick!

4
  • 6
    Bear in mind that -2000,-2000 is rather close to the visible area of a some multi-monitor setups. You might want to go a bit further than that...
    – Will Dean
    Mar 26, 2009 at 0:11
  • 3
    Or perhaps even use values from the Screen class to determine a point that will definitely be off screen.
    – jpierson
    Jun 23, 2010 at 23:35
  • Will Dean is right. -2000 is visible on my multi-monitor configuration.
    – Maris B.
    Feb 4, 2011 at 19:47
  • This window is still visible, and for some scenarios such as CITRIX it would be considered an active app and hold the session open. Oct 6, 2011 at 19:21
19

In the process of re-writing a VC++ TaskTray App, in C# .NET, I found the following method truly workable to achieve the following.

  1. No initial form dislayed at startup
  2. Running Message Loop that can be used with Invoke/BeginInvoke as needed as IsWindowHandle is true

The steps I followed:

  1. Used an ApplicationContext in Application.Run() Instead of a form. See http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/18683/Creating-a-Tasktray-Application for the example I used.
  2. Set the Form's ShowInTaskbar property to true within the GUI Designer. (This seems counter productive but it works)
  3. Override the OnLoad() method in your Form Class setting Visible and ShowInTaskbar to false as shown below.
protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
    {
        Visible = false; 
        ShowInTaskbar = false; 
        base.OnLoad(e);
    }
2
  • Works! :) Thanks.
    – Sabuncu
    Jan 12, 2018 at 18:57
  • At least in Windows 10 this doesn't work. I've found if the ShowInTaskbar == false the window under no circumstance will receive messages. Ugh. Apr 17, 2020 at 21:00
16

I know this is old question, but it ranks well in google, so I will provide my solution anyway.

I do two things:

private void Form_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Opacity = 0;
}

private void Form_Shown(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Visible = false;
    Opacity = 100;
}
9

The best way is to use the following 1-2 lines in the constuctor:

this.WindowState = FormWindowState.Minimized;
this.ShowInTaskbar = false; // This is optional

You can even set the Minimized property in the VS Property window.

4
  • 1
    This window is still 'visible' to the system though minimised and hidden to the user, and for some scenarios such as CITRIX it would be considered an active app and hold the session open. Oct 6, 2011 at 21:54
  • @GregDomjan What if you use this code and then called this.Hide();? Jun 18, 2012 at 17:48
  • 1
    @JohnKurlak Sure, calling Hide(); at some later stage would probably complete the solution. Jun 19, 2012 at 2:34
  • Calling Hide() hides the taskbar icon and thus it will not receive messages. At least in Windows 10 the mere fact that the taskbar icon is hidden is the key to it not receiving messages. Apr 17, 2020 at 21:01
5

You can create a class that inherits from System.Windows.Forms.NativeWindow (which provides basic message loop capability) and reference the Handle property in its constructor to create its handle and hook it into the message loop. Once you call Application.Run, you will be able to process messages from it.

5

I solved the problem like this:

[STAThread]
static void Main()
{
    Application.EnableVisualStyles();
    Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
    Main main = new Main();
    Application.Run();
    //Application.Run(new Main());
}

This code resides in the Program.cs file, and you can see the original Application.Run method call commented out. I just create a Main class object (my main form class is named Main) and start application message loop w/o any parameters. This starts the application, initializes any form components but doesn't show the form.

Note: you have to have some method to get your window showing (like system tray icon, hotkey or timer or anything you might like).

2
  • This is a nice, clean approach, but it might benefit from the addition of an ApplicationContext object so that you have control over when the application terminates. Jun 5, 2010 at 6:32
  • 1
    The win32 base window is not created and so no messages can be sent to it. Oct 6, 2011 at 22:05
2
public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private bool _isApplicationRun;

    public Form1(bool applicationRun)
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        _isApplicationRun = applicationRun;
    }

    protected override void SetVisibleCore(bool value)
    {
        if (_isApplicationRun)
        {
            _isApplicationRun = false;

            base.SetVisibleCore(false);
            return;
        }

        base.SetVisibleCore(value);
    }
}

static class Program
{

    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {

        Application.Run(new Form1(true));
    }
}
1
  • You cannot call BeginInvoke() on this form (ApplicationContext.MainForm)
    – mheyman
    Apr 10, 2012 at 16:26
1

Why can't you just pass the form when you call Application.Run? Given that it's clearly a blocking call, on what event do you want to show the form? Just calling form.Show() should be enough.

1

Using Kami's answer as an inspiration, I created a more complete concept. If you use this solution, don't ever show the hidden window. If you do, the user might close it and then you've lost the ability to control the application exit in an orderly way. This approach can be used to manage a Timer, NotifyIcon, or any other component that is happy living on an invisible form.

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace SimpleHiddenWinform
{
    internal class HiddenForm : Form
    {
        private Timer _timer;
        private ApplicationContext _ctx;

        public HiddenForm(ApplicationContext ctx)
        {
            _ctx = ctx;
            _timer = new Timer()
            {
                Interval = 5000, //5 second delay
                Enabled = true
            };
            _timer.Tick += new EventHandler(_timer_Tick);
        }

        void _timer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //tell the main message loop to quit
            _ctx.ExitThread();
        }
    }

    static class Program
    {
        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            var ctx = new ApplicationContext();
            var frmHidden = new HiddenForm(ctx);
            //pass the application context, not the form
            Application.Run(ctx);
        }
    }
}
0
Form1 f1=new Form1();
f1.WindowState = FormWindowState.Minimized;
f1.ShowInTaskbar = false;
1
  • 1
    Code is good. However it would help others if you add a description of what and why this solve the problem. Mar 9, 2017 at 5:48
-1

in the Form1 code file add this.Visible = false; to the constructor.

This will hide the window but it will flash for a sec before it is hidden. Alternatively you can write your own Application.Run command.

for more info http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/en-US/winforms/thread/dece45c8-9076-497e-9414-8cd9b34f572f/

also you may want to set the this.ShowInTaskbar to false.

0
-1

You should look at creating a 'service' as this is an application without a form. See http://support.microsoft.com/kb/816169

2
  • It may well be very difficult in recent versions of Windows to make a service which a message loop that responds in the same way as an app on the user's desktop.
    – Will Dean
    Mar 26, 2009 at 0:09
  • I believe administrative permissions are needed in order to install a service however a standalone application can run just fine under a regular user account using the techniques discussed here.
    – jpierson
    Jun 23, 2010 at 23:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy