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I just started learning smart pointer and came across a situation which seems to be contradicting with the theory. For e.g. When we use shared_ptr and if copy semantic is called the both the object shares the ownership and ref count is 2. This is okay and understood. code for example.

 class Test {
    public:
    Test(){ cout << "Const" << "\n"; }

    void Disp(){
        cout << "Class Test()\n";
    }

    ~Test(){ cout << "Dest" << "\n"; }
 };

int main()
{
 Test *p = new Test();
 shared_ptr<Test> p1(p);
 shared_ptr<Test> p2(p1); // = make_shared<Test>(*p1);

 p1->Disp();
 p2->Disp();

}

And output is fine as :

Const
Class Test()
Class Test()
Dest

Now if I try move semantic as

int main()
{
 Test *p = new Test();
 shared_ptr<Test> p1(p);
 shared_ptr<Test> p2 = make_shared<Test>(*p1);

 p1->Disp();
 p2->Disp();

}

Then p1 should have lost the ownership. Hence p1->Disp() should be valid. Because make_shared will transfer ownership as well as reset the p1. But still I can call p1->Disp() and the proper function is getting called. Please correct my understanding.

Thanks.

6
  • 3
    There is no move semantic in your second example, you are creating a new Test object Commented Jul 15, 2021 at 19:58
  • Then what is the difference between example 1 and 2 because in both we are creating another shared_ptr from first shared_ptr object? Also, then in how can I call move semantics ? In which case the 1st pointer goes null after 2nd getting created ? Commented Jul 15, 2021 at 20:03
  • 2
    In the first example you have a single instance of Test which both shared_ptr refer to. In the second one you have two instances of Test and each shared_ptr refers to a different one. Commented Jul 15, 2021 at 20:04
  • Understood. can you please answer the 2nd and 3rd part of my first comment Commented Jul 15, 2021 at 20:11
  • 1
    @NihalKumar You need to call the move constructor of shared_ptr, using make_shared() will not call that. And if you think about it, make_shared<Test>(*p1) cant move ownership from p1, because it doesn't know what p1 is to steal ownership from it. *p1 refers to the object that p1 is holding a pointer to, it is not p1 itself. Commented Jul 15, 2021 at 21:01

1 Answer 1

8

The main misunderstanding is that std::make_shared does not move ownership of the old object. Instead you are creating a second instance of Test which the new std::shared_ptr refers to.

If you really want to move ownership you need to do so explicitly, e.g.:

int main()
{
 Test *p = new Test();
 shared_ptr<Test> p1(p);
 shared_ptr<Test> p2(std::move(p1));

 // p1->Disp(); // No longer allowed, as p1 is now "empty"
 p2->Disp();
}

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