5

I have the array ["a", "b", "c"] and I want to join them together to form "a#b#c#". String.join will only get me "a#b#c". I can't just do str += "#" either because that is slow (Java has to create a new string to do that). So instead I have to rewrite the whole thing using StringBuilder. Is there some method Java has that is basically String.join but also appends the delimiter to the end?

For a little more context, I'm trying to create a Suffix Array data structure with a group of strings, so this part of it is actually a bottleneck.

7
  • 8
    Can you add an empty string "" to the end of the array and then call join? Jul 17, 2021 at 19:05
  • @WanderNauta Isn't the performance impact of copying the array to add an element likely higher than just adding another character to the string after joining?
    – Matt
    Jul 17, 2021 at 19:16
  • 3
    "I can't just do str += "#" either because that is slow.". It's not that slow.
    – Kayaman
    Jul 17, 2021 at 19:17
  • Wander Nauta is right adding empty string to the end will get you the expected output
    – Partho
    Jul 17, 2021 at 19:17
  • Chances are that the compiler will optimize str += "#" to use a StringBuilder, if it is believed to be faster...
    – MC Emperor
    Jul 17, 2021 at 19:23

3 Answers 3

11

You can use Stream API Collectors.joining() There are prefix and suffix arguments like that:

    Stream.of("a", "b", "c")
        .collect(Collectors.joining("#", "", "#"));

Where joining arguments is delimiter, prefix, suffix respectively.

Also, you can just add an empty String to your array like says @Wander Nauta in the comment above

I've started JMH, also and reproduce performance differences which wrote bellow:

public class Benchmarks {

private static final String[] arr = {"a", "b", "c"};

@Benchmark
@OutputTimeUnit(TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS)
@Fork(value = 1, warmups = 1)
@BenchmarkMode(Mode.AverageTime)
public String joinAndConcat() {
    return String.join("#", arr) + "#";
}

@Benchmark
@Fork(value = 1, warmups = 1)
@OutputTimeUnit(TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS)
@BenchmarkMode(Mode.AverageTime)
public String streamsJoining() {
    return Stream.of(arr)
            .parallel()
            .collect(Collectors.joining("#", "", "#"));
}

@Benchmark
@Fork(value = 1, warmups = 1)
@OutputTimeUnit(TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS)
@BenchmarkMode(Mode.AverageTime)
public String stringJoiner() {
    StringJoiner joiner = new StringJoiner("#", "", "#");
    for (String el : arr) {
        joiner.add(el);
    }
    return joiner.toString();
  }
}

Results:

> Benchmark                  Mode  Cnt   Score   Error  Units
> Benchmarks.joinAndConcat   avgt    5  46,670 ± 0,139  ns/op
> Benchmarks.streamsJoining  avgt    5  73,336 ± 0,180  ns/op
> Benchmarks.stringJoiner    avgt    5  27,236 ± 0,386  ns/op

But you must understand that 46 nSec is a very small difference for most applications.

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  • 2
    I like this solution but if OP is worried that += is slow than I'd assume Stream with a collector is too slow as well. Jul 17, 2021 at 19:22
  • 2
    @KarolDowbecki what do you think the collector uses internally? It's effectively just the same as your answer. Jul 17, 2021 at 19:23
  • I'd imagine that creating a Stream pipeline, even with just a single collector, out of an array will be more expensive than +=. Jul 17, 2021 at 19:25
  • I'm sure this isn't a real problem for modern jdk, because there are a lot of byte code optimizations, such as using StringBuilder instead concatenation operator
    – Dmitrii B
    Jul 17, 2021 at 19:26
  • 2
    @DmitriiBykov the same approach could/should be taken for straight concatenation, of course. Jul 17, 2021 at 19:31
5

Here are the performance measures using JMH:

Benchmark       Mode   Cnt         Score        Error  Units
StringJoiner    thrpt  100  23641181.522 ± 237176.955  ops/s
JoinAndConcat   thrpt  100  14197523.377 ± 130873.538  ops/s
StreamsJoining  thrpt  100   9538282.522 ± 156729.920  ops/s

The solution with streams takes around 2.5x longer compared to the solution with StringJoiner. In the midfield is as expected the join with concatenation (see question). However, we are talking about nanoseconds here.

A graphical overview showing the performance with recalculated values (ops/s => ns/op): result


# JMH version: 1.32
# VM version: JDK 11.0.11, OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM, 11.0.11+9
# VM invoker: /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/adoptopenjdk-11.jdk/Contents/Home/bin/java
# VM options: <none>
# Blackhole mode: full + dont-inline hint
# Warmup: 10 iterations, 1 s each
# Measurement: 10 iterations, 1 s each
# Timeout: 10 min per iteration
# Threads: 1 thread, will synchronize iterations
# Benchmark mode: Throughput, ops/time
import java.util.StringJoiner;
import java.util.stream.Collectors;
import java.util.stream.Stream;
import org.openjdk.jmh.annotations.Benchmark;

public class Benchmarks {

    private static final String[] arr = {"a", "b", "c"};

    @Benchmark
    public String joinAndConcat() {
        return String.join("#", arr) + "#";
    }

    @Benchmark
    public String streamsJoining() {
        return Stream.of(arr)
                .collect(Collectors.joining("#", "", "#"));
    }

    @Benchmark
    public String stringJoiner() {
        StringJoiner joiner = new StringJoiner("#", "", "#");
        for (String el : arr) {
            joiner.add(el);
        }
        return joiner.toString();
    }
}
0
2

String.join() uses StringJoiner behind the scenes so you can create one and specify suffix parameter as # in the constructor:

String[] array = { "a", "b", "c" };
StringJoiner joiner = new StringJoiner("#", "", "#");
for (String el : array) {
  joiner.add(el);
}
System.out.println(joiner.toString()); // a#b#c#

However this feels like micro optimizing. Unless your joining code is critical it's way more readable to write:

String[] array = { "a", "b", "c" };
System.out.println(String.join("#", array) + "#"); // a#b#c#
1

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