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Two of my React components are connected together. You might be thinking, if they are both separate components then they shouldn't be connected, right. WRONG.

What I want to do is this. I want to create a footer but the footer is apparently linked to another component. I think this is a react bug but I have decided not to go there in case it's just my fault. I want to change the width of the footer to be max width with the screen but it doesn't work, it changes both of the components width.

.footer {
   width: 100%;
}

.footer {
    background-color: gray;
    border: 1px solid gray;
    border-radius: 1px;
    height: 100px;
    width: 10000px; /*Or 100%*/
}

.otherComponent {
  /*For some reason it copies the same attributes as the css one above (there in different files by the way*/
  width: 10000px; /*Or 100%*/ /*The one that got copied by react.*/
  background-color: gray;
  border: 1px solid gray;
  border-radius: 1px;
  height: 100px;
}
<div class="otherComponent">

</div>
<br />
<p>This is to demonstrate the bug/error that is happening with my program. And what it looks like</p>
<div class="footer">
            
</div>

Edit:

I am editing this question since I have received comments saying that this question is not understandable, which I understand. The problem is that I want one of the components (which is a code-box for a documentation website that I am working on) to be somehow separated from another component (which is the footer). Every time I apply a style to the footer component the code-box component is having the same styles.

Information

Both of the different styles for the components are in separate folders. They are separated away from each-other using "<br />" tags. The components are placed like this in the App.js file.

{/* Middle of the page */}
    <HomeInfo />
        
{/* Bottom of the page */}
    <Footer />

If this edit still doesn't make sense commenting on the post would help.

4
  • 3
    Do both CSS classes have the same name? What are you using to bundle your app? Are you using CSS Modules? Your provided code gives us no insight into what the cause could be just the result you are receiving.
    – Jacob Smit
    Jul 21 at 1:25
  • I have only shown what is happening, not the actual code. The reason being for this is that I am trying to protect my code. My code is going to be pushed into a companies codebase and showing the code to other people is prohibited. (According to them)
    – TahaHaza00
    Jul 21 at 17:17
  • @JacobSmit thanks for telling me though, I made this question at like 2 AM and didn't put much thought into it, I will make it easier to understand.
    – TahaHaza00
    Jul 21 at 17:19
  • It sounds like you have two components mysteriously sharing CSS styles. Unless you post how your components are binding to those CSS styles, this question cannot be answered.
    – Alex Wayne
    Jul 21 at 18:41
1

As there is little to go on here I'll describe one case where this could occur.

Given the following two components and root app.

Component A:

CSS:

.root {
    width: 100%;
}

.component-a-heading {
    color: blue;
}

Component:

import React from 'react';
import './component-a.css';

const ComponentA = () => {
    return (
        <div className="root">
            <h1 className="component-a-heading">
                I am component A
            </h1>
        </div>
    )
}

export default ComponentB;

Component B:

CSS:

.root {
    width: 50%;
}

.component-b-heading {
    color: red;
}

Component:

import React from 'react';
import './component-b.css';

const ComponentB = () => {
    return (
        <div className="root">
            <h1 className="component-b-heading">
                I am component B
            </h1>
        </div>
    )
}

export default ComponentA;

App:

import React from 'react';
import ComponentA from './ComponentA';
import ComponentB from './ComponentB';

const App = () => {
    return (
        <div>
            <ComponentA />
            <ComponentB />
        </div>
    );
}

export default App;

The assumed intended result is that:

  • ComponentA would be 100% width,
  • ComponentA heading would be blue,
  • ComponentB would be 50% width,
  • ComponentB heading would be red.

The reality is that:

  • ComponentA would be 50% width,
  • ComponentA heading would be blue,
  • ComponentB would be 50% width,
  • ComponentB heading would be red.

This is caused by the fact that even though the CSS unique to each component is imported per component the resulting CSS is global and effects all components that might use the class names defined within (in the example above .root).

Depending on your bundling process you might end up with a single CSS file that looks something like this:

.root {
    width: 100%;
}

.component-a-heading {
    color: blue;
}

.root {
    width: 50%;
}

.component-b-heading {
    color: red;
}

Or you might end up with the styles inserted into the head of your HTML like this:

<style type="text/css">
    .root {
        width: 100%;
    }

    .component-a-heading {
        color: blue;
    }
</style>
<style>
    .root {
        width: 50%;
    }

    .component-b-heading {
        color: red;
    }
</style>

This is a common mistake for people who come from Angular, where imported CSS is scoped to each component, to React.

One way to get around this is to look at the possibility of using CSS Modules which will allow you to locally scope each imported CSS file (this just makes the CSS class names unique in your resulting bundle).

Another option would be to implement a naming policy to ensure that the class names remain unique between components.

2
  • Thank you so much, your solution worked, I should've realised this. I'm so stupid, my PR is late... Wish me luck
    – TahaHaza00
    Jul 21 at 23:35
  • Good luck. Simple things can sometimes be the easiest to miss.
    – Jacob Smit
    Jul 21 at 23:37

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