0

I am trying to return an array with two arrays the first being borrowed books and the other being returned books. The prompt that I have to use is:

The partitionBooksByBorrowedStatus() function in public/src/books.js has a single parameter:

  • An array of books.

It returns an array with two arrays inside of it. All of the inputted books are present in either the first or second array.

The first array contains books that have been loaned out, and are not yet returned while the second array contains books that have been returned. You can check for the return status by looking at the first transaction in the borrows array.

Here is a portion of the data provided:

const books = [{
id: "5f447132d487bd81da01e25e",
title: "sit eiusmod occaecat eu magna",
genre: "Science",
authorId: 8,
borrows: [
  {
    id: "5f446f2e2cfa3e1d234679b9",
    returned: false,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2ed3609b719568a415",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e1c71888e2233621e",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e6059326d9feb9a68",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2ede05a0b1e3394d8b",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e4081699cdc6a2735",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e3900dfec59489477",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e6059326d9feb9a68",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e409f8883af2955dd",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e3900dfec59489477",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2eae901a82e0259947",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2ef2ab5f5a9f60c4f2",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2ea6b68cf6f85f6e28",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2eed18105706d6ca19",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2eae901a82e0259947",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e91c2af00cb74e82b",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e5aa2bb5545a0f8a6",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2ea508b6a99c3e42c6",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e50cc2da9cd80efdb",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e0b3e2ff72fc503e7",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e91c2af00cb74e82b",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2ef795e593cd3cd19d",
    returned: true,
  },
  {
    id: "5f446f2e2f35653fa80bf490",
    returned: true,
  },

Here is what I have tried so far:

function partitionBooksByBorrowedStatus(books) {

  let available = [];
  let unavailable = [];
  const bookStatuses = [];

  books.forEach((book) => {
   const isBookReturned = book.borrows[0].returned;
   if (isBookReturned) { // if book is returned
     available.push(book);
   } else { // if book is not returned
     unavailable.push(book);
   }
 });

 bookStatuses.push(available);
 bookStatuses.push(unavailable);

 return bookStatuses; //

}

When I run the code it returns an error that states "Expected 3 to equal 6" for the life of me I cannot figure it out. Your comments and suggestions would be much appreciated, thanks!

4
  • How are you calling the function? The return isn't causing the error. What's the expected output?
    – Andy
    Jul 21 at 1:31
  • 1
    It’s a little unclear what the 3 or 6 are referring to. But your returned array appears to be backwards; the problem statement indicates the checked-out books (presumably unavailable) should be first. Jul 21 at 1:33
  • You may have to produce a minimal reproducible example, because as Dave says, you're not getting 3 or 6 from that data as far as I can see.
    – Andy
    Jul 21 at 1:43
  • My fault Dave was correct i had my return values reverse, i swapped the available.push(book) for the unavailable.push(book) and it fixed it. Thanks guys! Jul 21 at 1:44
0

Thank you to @ Dave Newton who mentioned that my returned arrays appeared to be backwards I was able to swap the return values so the correct code is now:

function partitionBooksByBorrowedStatus(books) {
let available = [];
let unavailable = [];
const bookStatuses = [];
books.forEach((book) => {
  const isBookReturned = book.borrows[0].returned;

if (isBookReturned) { // if book is not returned
  unavailable.push(book);
} else { // if book is returned
  available.push(book);
}
});
bookStatuses.push(available);
bookStatuses.push(unavailable);
return bookStatuses;
}
0

This can be done fairly easily with JavaScript's Array reduce method. You need to provide the initial accumulator with an object that maps the expected output and then populate one of the two arrays depending on whether the book has at least one occurrence of the book not being returned. (Could also be done by testing the number of "returned == false" is odd).

Assumption 1: A book that's never been borrowed should count as "being returned" Assumption 2: A "book" is a literal unique individual copy of an ISBN.

Correction: Didn't see that 1st element of the borrows array indicates current status.

const books = [
{
    id: "0",
    title: "never borrowed",
    genre: "Science",
    authorId: 8,
    borrows: []
},
{
    id: "1",
    title: "returned",
    genre: "Science",
    authorId: 8,
    borrows: [
        {
            id: "5f446f2e2f35653fa80bf490",
            returned: true,
        }
    ]
},
{
    id: "5f447132d487bd81da01e25e",
    title: "not returned",
    genre: "Science",
    authorId: 8,
    borrows: [
        {
            id: "5f446f2e2cfa3e1d234679b9",
            returned: false,
        }
    ]
}]

function partitionBooksByBorrowedStatus(b) {
    return b.reduce( (a, c) => { a[+(c.borrows[0] && c.borrows[0].returned)].push(c); return a }, [[],[]] )
}

console.log(partitionBooksByBorrowedStatus(books))

7
  • It’s obtuse enough without the unary, and less efficient than the simple, obvious approach—there’s no need to iterate the entire borrows array. IMO a nested filter/reduce here just obfuscates intent and makes it harder to reason about. Jul 21 at 12:31
  • There's nothing explicit in the question that would indicate that the first element of the borrows array is the only one where returned could be false, so on the face of it you do need to iterate the entire thing. Jul 21 at 15:35
  • "You can check for the return status by looking at the first transaction in the borrows array." Jul 21 at 15:36
  • Ahh, my mistake. Makes things significantly simpler. Jul 21 at 15:52
  • 👍 Yep, and it's a little buried in the question (probably why OP missed the issue in the first place ;) Jul 21 at 15:54

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