1

I've built an F# app and now I'm using EF4.1 (code first) as a data store. I've stumbled upon a really quirky issue around typing.

Take the following snippet:

                let result = context
                                .SearchResults
                                .Where((fun (r:SearchResult) -> 
                                        r.Program = request.Program))
                                .OrderByDescending((fun r -> r.AcquisitionDate))
                                .FirstOrDefault()
                match result with
                    | price -> 
                        cacheProvider.Set(result)
                        Some(price)
                    | _ ->
                        ignore(context.SearchRequests.Add(request))
                        ignore(context.SaveChanges())
                        None

when the search result does not exist, the .FirstOrDefault() call returns null. So result is bound to null during runtime. But at compile time the F# compiler expects that result will never be null so I can't do pattern checking around null (price when price <> null).

What am I missing here? Is there a proper way to do this?

1
  • 1
    Aside - I'm not sure if this is what you're trying to do, but note that when you write code in this style, the argument to e.g. Where is a lambda function (Func) as opposed to an expression tree (Expression<Func<...>>), which means that your qurey will be executed in memory. The equivalent to C# queries must be written using quotations and LINQ support implemented in F# PowerPack: fsharppowerpack.codeplex.com (which is currently a bit limited). Jul 27, 2011 at 17:18

3 Answers 3

2

You can test for equality against Unchecked.defaultof<_> instead of null.

1

Could you do a null check inside the WHERE clause? as (r.Program <> null && r.Program = request.Program). I'm assuming that there is a problem in the WHERE than how F# is interpreting it.

-Fahad

2
  • well the issue is that the sql returns no results. the .FirstOrDefault() returns the value if available or the default(T) if not, which in this case means it returns null! Jul 27, 2011 at 16:06
  • OK, in that sense Ankur's reply should help you. One more way is to do a ToArray() / ToList() and return a Some(Data) or None based on the count of your list.
    – Fahad
    Jul 27, 2011 at 16:17
1

You can do

let result = context
                    .SearchResults
                    .Where((fun (r:SearchResult) -> 
                            r.Program = request.Program))
                    .OrderByDescending((fun r -> r.AcquisitionDate))
                    .Take(1).ToList()
    match result.Length with
        | 1 -> 
            cacheProvider.Set(result.[0])
            Some(result.[0])
        | _ ->
            ignore(context.SearchRequests.Add(request))
            ignore(context.SaveChanges())
            None
3
  • nope, doesn't compile, that's my point. the compilation error says "the type 'SearchResult' does not have 'null' as a proper value Jul 27, 2011 at 16:17
  • 2
    I found this: stackoverflow.com/questions/2983242/… which mentions a [<EnableNullLiteral>] attribute (to decorate my fsharp type) but i'd rather not use if possible Jul 27, 2011 at 16:18
  • Updated my answer to use Take and ToList methods
    – Ankur
    Jul 27, 2011 at 16:22

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