4

I am trying to understand how to correctly overload the operator << with a pointer variable on the RHS, using a reference parameter. Here is an example code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
 public:
   void print(ostream& out) const { out << "Hello World!"; }
};

ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const A*& handle)
{
   handle->print(out);
   return out;
}

int main() {
   A *a = new A();
   cout << a << endl;
   delete a;
}

I am assuming that the result should be Hello World!. Instead, the program prints the address of the object a 0x7f9bc6405be0, so apparently cout << a is not calling my overloading function.

Could anyone please explain why my definition of overloading << is not working as I expected?

8
  • 4
    Your function is not the best match because the parameter is const, while your variable a is not. Make them match. Jul 21 at 20:30
  • 2
    Change ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const A*& handle) to ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const A* handle) and Bob's your uncle.
    – Eljay
    Jul 21 at 20:49
  • 2
    Yes, there's no point using a reference for a primitive (small) type like a pointer, which is more efficiently passed by value. Jul 21 at 20:52
  • 7
    i'd rather suggest you to drop the pointer and instead call cout << *a << endl;. Overloading operators for pointers isnt that common, ie it is a surprise and surprises arent nice Jul 21 at 20:52
  • 2
    "Isn't that common" is putting it lightly. In a large codebase, this is the kind of thing that would make someone scream after debugging strange behaviour for an hour.
    – chris
    Jul 21 at 21:03
2

I am guessing that -- in the spirit of similar overloaded functions -- you were trying to make your parameter a const reference. That is, a reference to a const object.

Your parameter:

 const A*& handle

Is not a const reference. It's a (reference &) to a (mutable pointer *) to a (const A).

Change your parameter to this and it will work:

 A *const & handle

This is a (reference &) to a (const pointer *const) to an (A).

Whether A is const or not is up to you and the intentions of your code.

See it working in Compiler Explorer.

3
  • This is exactly the answer I was looking for! I didn't know that pointer operator * can be modified by const this way. I was indeed confused by how to make my parameter a const reference. Thanks.
    – C.-C. Yang
    Jul 22 at 17:53
  • @C.-C.Yang a pointer is a type (not an operator) and any type can be const. Look into "east const" if you would like to develop a habit of confidently putting const in the right spot. Jul 22 at 18:32
  • Oh, yes, sorry. * is a type when used in a declaration. I will look into "east const". Thanks.
    – C.-C. Yang
    Jul 22 at 20:34
1
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
 public:
   void print(ostream& out) const { out << "Hello World!"; }
};

ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const A*& handle)
{
   handle->print(out);
   return out;
}

int main() {
   A *a = new A();
   cout << a << endl;
   delete a;
}

operator<< function expects reference to pointer of A object in your code. You may use ref to pointer function, for example, to change the address of the parameter because if you call the function by sending pointer and expecting pointer as in the below then the function copies the address of the object to that pointer points to use in its stack and loses the address of the pointer, so the function cannot change the address of the parameter.

You can change the signature in two ways like those, then it works:

ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, const A* handle)

Here, the caller calls the function with pass by value of A*, then inside the function it accesses the print function.

Second way about which also your other question is, to correct the mismatch by adding const keyword to the variable within main function or deleting const keyword in the signature of the function. Converting a non-const pointer to const reference to pointer implicitly may yield an invalid state:

int* p;
const int x;
// a now reference to pointer p; it is not valid operation sure
const int*& a = p;  
// if this operation was allowed and if we also changed the address
// to that p points 
*a = &x;
// then it would allow p to access and change const so we would change const data through non-cont pointer. 

 
0
0

Given the comments so far, I did some more experiments. It all boils down to the match between a call and a function signature. The following code demonstrates this:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void test(int& a) { // I can remove this function.
   cout << "void test(int& a): a = "
        << a << endl;
}

void test(const int& a) {
   cout << "void test(const int& a): a = "
        << a << endl;
}

void test(int*& a) { // I cannot remove this function.
   cout << "void test(int*& a): a = "
        << *a << endl;
}

void test(const int*& a) {
   cout << "void test(const int*& a): a = "
        << *a << endl;
   a = a + 3;
}

int main() {
   int a = 2, c = 5;
   const int b = 3, d = 7;
   int* pc = &c;
   const int* pd = &d;
   test(a);
   test(b);
   test(pc);
   test(pd);
}  

The code prints

void test(int& a): a = 2
void test(const int& a): a = 3
void test(int*& a): a = 5
void test(const int*& a): a = 7

Curiously, I can remove the function void test(int& a) and the call test(a) will use the function void test(const int& a). By contrast, I cannot remove the function void test(int*& a) and the call test(pc) will still not match the function void test(const int*& a).

If someone can explain this difference in the comments, I can mark this question as answered.

1
  • please do not use answers for follow up questions. You can always open a new question t to ask more questions. Jul 22 at 13:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.