2

I was expecting the Python match/case to have equal time access to each case, but seems like I was wrong. Any good explanation why?

Lets use the following example:

def match_case(decimal):
    match decimal:
      case '0':
        return "000"
      case '1':
        return "001"
      case '2':
        return "010"
      case '3':
        return "011"
      case '4':
        return "100"
      case '5':
        return "101"
      case '6':
        return "110"
      case '7':
        return "111"
      case _:
        return "NA"

And define a quick tool to measure the time:

import time
def measure_time(funcion):
    def measured_function(*args, **kwargs):
        init = time.time()
        c = funcion(*args, **kwargs)
        print(f"Input: {args[1]} Time: {time.time() - init}")
        return c
    return measured_function

@measure_time
def repeat(function, input):
    return [function(input) for i in range(10000000)]

If we run each 10000000 times each case, the times are the following:

for i in range(8):
    repeat(match_case, str(i))

# Input: 0 Time: 2.458001136779785
# Input: 1 Time: 2.36093807220459
# Input: 2 Time: 2.6832823753356934
# Input: 3 Time: 2.9995620250701904
# Input: 4 Time: 3.5054492950439453
# Input: 5 Time: 3.815168857574463
# Input: 6 Time: 4.164452791213989
# Input: 7 Time: 4.857251167297363

Just wondering why the access times are different. Isn't this optimised with perhaps a lookup table?. Note that I'm not interested in other ways of having equals access times (i.e. with dictionaries).

4
  • that match/case code isn't even python... – Jab Jul 21 at 21:29
  • 3
    @Jab It's Python 3.10. – mportes Jul 21 at 21:34
  • 1
    Your expectation is wrong. This isn't a switch case on primitive data types. It's for pattern matching. It is *not a switch – juanpa.arrivillaga Jul 21 at 21:39
  • There is room for optimization (with all literal patterns, I suspect a lookup table could be built), but at this time it does not appear to be optimized. – chepner Jul 22 at 1:13
1

I tried to replicate your experiment with another function call match_if :

def match_if(decimal):
    if decimal == '0':
        return "000"
    elif decimal == '1':
        return "001"
    elif decimal == '2':
        return "010"
    elif decimal == '3':
        return "011"
    elif decimal == '4':
        return "100"
    elif decimal == '5':
        return "101"
    elif decimal == '6':
        return "110"
    elif decimal == '7':
        return "111"
    else:
        return "NA"

It appears that if we use the if, elif, else statement is less efficient that the match / case method. Here my results :

for i in range(8):
    repeat(match_if, str(i))


Input: 0 Time: 1.6081502437591553
Input: 1 Time: 1.7993037700653076
Input: 2 Time: 2.094271659851074
Input: 3 Time: 2.3727521896362305
Input: 4 Time: 2.6943907737731934
Input: 5 Time: 2.922682285308838
Input: 6 Time: 3.3238701820373535
Input: 7 Time: 3.569467782974243

Results match / case :

for i in range(8):
    repeat(match_case, str(i))

 Input: 0 Time: 1.4507110118865967
 Input: 1 Time: 1.745032787322998
 Input: 2 Time: 1.988663911819458
 Input: 3 Time: 2.2570419311523438
 Input: 4 Time: 2.54061222076416
 Input: 5 Time: 2.7649216651916504
 Input: 6 Time: 3.1373682022094727
 Input: 7 Time: 3.3378067016601562

I don't have a precise answer about why these results, but this experiment show that if we use if statement is little bit longer than the match case.

1
  • It's interesting to note that the two functions generate very similar byte code.' – chepner Jul 22 at 1:40
1

PEP 622 The "match\case" functionality is developed to replace the code like this:

def is_tuple(node):
if isinstance(node, Node) and node.children == [LParen(), RParen()]:
    return True
return (isinstance(node, Node)
        and len(node.children) == 3
        and isinstance(node.children[0], Leaf)
        and isinstance(node.children[1], Node)
        and isinstance(node.children[2], Leaf)
        and node.children[0].value == "("
        and node.children[2].value == ")")

with code like this:

def is_tuple(node: Node) -> bool:
match node:
    case Node(children=[LParen(), RParen()]):
        return True
    case Node(children=[Leaf(value="("), Node(), Leaf(value=")")]):
        return True
    case _:
        return False

While it may be equivalent to a dict lookup in the most primitive cases, in general it is not so. Case patterns are designed to look like normal python code but actually they conceal isinsance and len calls and don't execute what you'd expect to be executed when you see code like Node().

Essentially this is equivalent to a chain of if ... elif ... else statements. Note that unlike for the previously proposed switch statement, the pre-computed dispatch dictionary semantics does not apply here.

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