391

In Prototype I can show a "loading..." image with this code:

var myAjax = new Ajax.Request( url, {method: 'get', parameters: pars, 
onLoading: showLoad, onComplete: showResponse} );

function showLoad () {
    ...
}

In jQuery, I can load a server page into an element with this:

$('#message').load('index.php?pg=ajaxFlashcard');

but how do I attach a loading spinner to this command as I did in Prototype?

24 Answers 24

774

There are a couple of ways. My preferred way is to attach a function to the ajaxStart/Stop events on the element itself.

$('#loadingDiv')
    .hide()  // Hide it initially
    .ajaxStart(function() {
        $(this).show();
    })
    .ajaxStop(function() {
        $(this).hide();
    })
;

The ajaxStart/Stop functions will fire whenever you do any Ajax calls.

Update: As of jQuery 1.8, the documentation states that .ajaxStart/Stop should only be attached to document. This would transform the above snippet to:

var $loading = $('#loadingDiv').hide();
$(document)
  .ajaxStart(function () {
    $loading.show();
  })
  .ajaxStop(function () {
    $loading.hide();
  });
  • 45
    That's probably too global for one simple load into a DIV. – montrealist Jul 29 '09 at 17:05
  • 350
    too global? how many different "please wait" messages do you want? – nickf Aug 1 '09 at 17:59
  • 22
    this way unfortunately you can't control loading div positioning in case you don't want to just show a modal loading window, but show it near the element waiting for ajax content to be loaded in... – glaz666 Oct 17 '10 at 11:44
  • 9
    ajaxStart and ajaxStop are jQuery events so you can namespace them: stackoverflow.com/questions/1191485/… docs.jquery.com/Namespaced_Events – David Xia Apr 16 '11 at 22:57
  • 9
    If using jQuery >= 1.9, attach the ajaxStart and ajaxStop events to $(document). jquery.com/upgrade-guide/1.9/… – Domenic Jan 23 '13 at 8:13
203

For jQuery I use

jQuery.ajaxSetup({
  beforeSend: function() {
     $('#loader').show();
  },
  complete: function(){
     $('#loader').hide();
  },
  success: function() {}
});
  • 11
    works for me, the html should have something like: <div id='loader'><img src="spinner.gif"/></div> – yigal Jan 4 '12 at 6:40
  • 6
    This one was cleanest for me. Instead of ajaxSetup, I placed beforeSend: and complete: inside the $ajax({... statement. – kenswdev Dec 17 '12 at 15:49
  • 3
    Don't know what it's worth, but jQuery mentions in it's documentation that using .ajaxSetup() is not recommended. link – pec Sep 9 '13 at 0:45
  • Note here that beforeSend is called before every call, whereas ajaxStart is triggered only when the first ajax method is called. Likewise for ajaxStop, it is called when the last ajax call finishes. If you have more than one concurrent request, the snippet in this answer won't work properly. – nickf Nov 28 '13 at 22:57
  • Does not work for me if the ajax call times out (Firefox 28 for Mac). – osa Apr 22 '14 at 2:58
37

You can just use the jQuery's .ajax function and use its option beforeSend and define some function in which you can show something like a loader div and on success option you can hide that loader div.

jQuery.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: 'YOU_URL_TO_WHICH_DATA_SEND',
    data:'YOUR_DATA_TO_SEND',
    beforeSend: function() {
        $("#loaderDiv").show();
    },
    success: function(data) {
        $("#loaderDiv").hide();
    }
});

You can have any Spinning Gif image. Here is a website that is a great AJAX Loader Generator according to your color scheme: http://ajaxload.info/

  • 12
    The success won't be called if there is an error, but "you will always receive a complete callback, even for synchronous requests," according to jQuery Ajax Events. – LeeGee Sep 4 '12 at 12:02
22

You can insert the animated image into the DOM right before the AJAX call, and do an inline function to remove it...

$("#myDiv").html('<img src="images/spinner.gif" alt="Wait" />');
$('#message').load('index.php?pg=ajaxFlashcard', null, function() {
  $("#myDiv").html('');
});

This will make sure your animation starts at the same frame on subsequent requests (if that matters). Note that old versions of IE might have difficulties with the animation.

Good luck!

  • 12
    Top tip: Preload the spinner.gif in a div with display set to none. Otherwise you might get a bit of a delayed spinner effect as the spinner still downloads. – uriDium Jun 1 '10 at 8:06
  • nice tip, much simpler than using somebody else's plugin – Gordon Thompson Jun 17 '11 at 13:41
  • Nice! but dear , one thing more that I want to display spinner for 2 seconds even the page has already loaded. – Both FM Mar 27 '12 at 10:19
  • 4
    @BothFM Because people enjoy waiting for things...? – Josh Stodola Mar 28 '12 at 17:52
20
$('#message').load('index.php?pg=ajaxFlashcard', null, showResponse);
showLoad();

function showResponse() {
    hideLoad();
    ...
}

http://docs.jquery.com/Ajax/load#urldatacallback

  • You could have timing problems there, don't you? – Tim Büthe Nov 14 '11 at 14:11
  • 1
    @UltimateBrent I think you got it wrong. Why is showLoad() not a callback? JavaScript will load content asynchronously. showLoad() will work even before the content is loaded if i'm correct. – Jaseem Dec 1 '11 at 11:49
  • 1
    @Jaseem I use a similar method too and it actually relies on async calls. I would place showLoad somewhere before the ajax call but the whole point is to show a spinner, let JS start the call, and kill the spinner in a callback after the AJAX has completed. – Nenotlep Dec 12 '12 at 11:40
15

If you are using $.ajax() you can use somthing like this:

$.ajax({
        url: "destination url",
        success: sdialog,
        error: edialog,
        // shows the loader element before sending.
        beforeSend: function () { $("#imgSpinner1").show(); },
        // hides the loader after completion of request, whether successfull or failor.             
        complete: function () { $("#imgSpinner1").hide(); },             
        type: 'POST', dataType: 'json'
    });  
10

Use the loading plugin: http://plugins.jquery.com/project/loading

$.loading.onAjax({img:'loading.gif'});
  • 9
    One plugin for this simple task? That is not really a good solution is it? Who wants to load 100 scripts on a page? – Jaseem Dec 1 '11 at 11:50
  • 10
    What is a "good" number of plugins? 99? 48? 7? – Mark Wilden Mar 30 '12 at 22:11
  • 1
    Agreed. Compress and concatenate, if you want better performance. – Nathan Bubna Apr 2 '12 at 14:05
  • 8
    Disagreed: separate and modularise, reuse code, if you want to be able to maintain your work and have others do so too. What the chance of your user having such a poor connection their client can't load a plugin as well as your code? – LeeGee Sep 4 '12 at 11:57
  • Another good option... github.com/keithhackbarth/jquery-loading – keithhackbarth Apr 9 '13 at 16:08
8

Variant: I have an icon with id="logo" at the top left of the main page; a spinner gif is then overlaid on top (with transparency) when ajax is working.

jQuery.ajaxSetup({
  beforeSend: function() {
     $('#logo').css('background', 'url(images/ajax-loader.gif) no-repeat')
  },
  complete: function(){
     $('#logo').css('background', 'none')
  },
  success: function() {}
});
7

I ended up with two changes to the original reply.

  1. As of jQuery 1.8, ajaxStart and ajaxStop should only be attached to document. This makes it harder to filter only a some of the ajax requests. Soo...
  2. Switching to ajaxSend and ajaxComplete makes it possible to interspect the current ajax request before showing the spinner.

This is the code after these changes:

$(document)
    .hide()  // hide it initially
    .ajaxSend(function(event, jqxhr, settings) {
        if (settings.url !== "ajax/request.php") return;
        $(".spinner").show();
    })
    .ajaxComplete(function(event, jqxhr, settings) {
        if (settings.url !== "ajax/request.php") return;
        $(".spinner").hide();
    })
  • Nice workaround. ajaxComplete seems to fire prematurely when requests retry, so I've used a combination of ajaxSend and ajaxStop and it works great. – Mahn Nov 26 '14 at 22:46
  • @SchweizerSchoggi: There are other topics that answer that question, use the search! – Emil Stenström Sep 25 '15 at 14:51
7

I also want to contribute to this answer. I was looking for something similar in jQuery and this what I eventually ended up using.

I got my loading spinner from http://ajaxload.info/. My solution is based on this simple answer at http://christierney.com/2011/03/23/global-ajax-loading-spinners/.

Basically your HTML markup and CSS would look like this:

<style>
     #ajaxSpinnerImage {
          display: none;
     }
</style>

<div id="ajaxSpinnerContainer">
     <img src="~/Content/ajax-loader.gif" id="ajaxSpinnerImage" title="working..." />
</div>

And then you code for jQuery would look something like this:

<script>
     $(document).ready(function () {
          $(document)
          .ajaxStart(function () {
               $("#ajaxSpinnerImage").show();
          })
          .ajaxStop(function () {
               $("#ajaxSpinnerImage").hide();
          });

          var owmAPI = "http://api.openweathermap.org/data/2.5/weather?q=London,uk&APPID=YourAppID";
          $.getJSON(owmAPI)
          .done(function (data) {
               alert(data.coord.lon);
          })
          .fail(function () {
               alert('error');
          });
     });
</script>

It is as simple as that :)

7

You can simply assign a loader image to the same tag on which you later will load content using an Ajax call:

$("#message").html('<span>Loading...</span>');

$('#message').load('index.php?pg=ajaxFlashcard');

You can also replace the span tag with an image tag.

  • 1
    It will be hard to manage UI this way. We may need completely different styles for the "loading" text and final message. We can use the callback method mentioned above for handling this problem – Jaseem Dec 1 '11 at 11:52
6

As well as setting global defaults for ajax events, you can set behaviour for specific elements. Perhaps just changing their class would be enough?

$('#myForm').ajaxSend( function() {
    $(this).addClass('loading');
});
$('#myForm').ajaxComplete( function(){
    $(this).removeClass('loading');
});

Example CSS, to hide #myForm with a spinner:

.loading {
    display: block;
    background: url(spinner.gif) no-repeat center middle;
    width: 124px;
    height: 124px;
    margin: 0 auto;
}
/* Hide all the children of the 'loading' element */
.loading * {
    display: none;  
}
  • 2
    .loading > * { display:none; } verry smart thanks – borrel Feb 15 '13 at 15:37
  • 1
    This should be the selected answer in my view. Thanks @LeeGee. – Nam G VU Jun 26 '16 at 15:20
  • Realy great answer – Raskolnikov Mar 5 '18 at 9:33
4

Note that you must use asynchronous calls for spinners to work (at least that is what caused mine to not show until after the ajax call and then swiftly went away as the call had finished and removed the spinner).

$.ajax({
        url: requestUrl,
        data: data,
        dataType: 'JSON',
        processData: false,
        type: requestMethod,
        async: true,                         <<<<<<------ set async to true
        accepts: 'application/json',
        contentType: 'application/json',
        success: function (restResponse) {
            // something here
        },
        error: function (restResponse) {
            // something here                
        }
    });
4
$('#loading-image').html('<img src="/images/ajax-loader.gif"> Sending...');

        $.ajax({
            url:  uri,
            cache: false,
            success: function(){
                $('#loading-image').html('');           
            },

           error:   function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
            var text =  "Error has occured when submitting the job: "+jqXHR.status+ " Contact IT dept";
           $('#loading-image').html('<span style="color:red">'+text +'  </span>');

            }
        });
  • Shortest way would be to insert image tag with an image downloaded from ajaxload.info with transparent background – Izabela Skibinska Oct 11 '16 at 17:19
2

I've used the following with jQuery UI Dialog. (Maybe it works with other ajax callbacks?)

$('<div><img src="/i/loading.gif" id="loading" /></div>').load('/ajax.html').dialog({
    height: 300,
    width: 600,
    title: 'Wait for it...'
});

The contains an animated loading gif until its content is replaced when the ajax call completes.

2

This is the best way for me:

jQuery:

$(document).ajaxStart(function() {
  $(".loading").show();
});

$(document).ajaxStop(function() {
  $(".loading").hide();
});

Coffee:

  $(document).ajaxStart ->
    $(".loading").show()

  $(document).ajaxStop ->
    $(".loading").hide()

Docs: ajaxStart, ajaxStop

  • Right, and you can use it together with the plugin mentioned in this answer if you want ... – Matt Jul 31 '18 at 9:13
2

JavaScript

$.listen('click', '#captcha', function() {
    $('#captcha-block').html('<div id="loading" style="width: 70px; height: 40px; display: inline-block;" />');
    $.get("/captcha/new", null, function(data) {
        $('#captcha-block').html(data);
    }); 
    return false;
});

CSS

#loading { background: url(/image/loading.gif) no-repeat center; }
2

This is a very simple and smart plugin for that specific purpose: https://github.com/hekigan/is-loading

  • Really nice! Especially if you take a look at the demos ... Disable DOM elements, In Tag, Full Overlay, Element Overlay ... it provides everything you need. And you can easily combine Full Overlay with this answer to get it working instantly. – Matt Jul 31 '18 at 9:09
1

I do this:

var preloaderdiv = '<div class="thumbs_preloader">Loading...</div>';
           $('#detail_thumbnails').html(preloaderdiv);
             $.ajax({
                        async:true,
                        url:'./Ajaxification/getRandomUser?top='+ $(sender).css('top') +'&lef='+ $(sender).css('left'),
                        success:function(data){
                            $('#detail_thumbnails').html(data);
                        }
             });
1

I think you are right. This method is too global...

However - it is a good default for when your AJAX call has no effect on the page itself. (background save for example). ( you can always switch it off for a certain ajax call by passing "global":false - see documentation at jquery

When the AJAX call is meant to refresh part of the page, I like my "loading" images to be specific to the refreshed section. I would like to see which part is refreshed.

Imagine how cool it would be if you could simply write something like :

$("#component_to_refresh").ajax( { ... } ); 

And this would show a "loading" on this section. Below is a function I wrote that handles "loading" display as well but it is specific to the area you are refreshing in ajax.

First, let me show you how to use it

<!-- assume you have this HTML and you would like to refresh 
      it / load the content with ajax -->

<span id="email" name="name" class="ajax-loading">
</span>

<!-- then you have the following javascript --> 

$(document).ready(function(){
     $("#email").ajax({'url':"/my/url", load:true, global:false});
 })

And this is the function - a basic start that you can enhance as you wish. it is very flexible.

jQuery.fn.ajax = function(options)
{
    var $this = $(this);
    debugger;
    function invokeFunc(func, arguments)
    {
        if ( typeof(func) == "function")
        {
            func( arguments ) ;
        }
    }

    function _think( obj, think )
    {
        if ( think )
        {
            obj.html('<div class="loading" style="background: url(/public/images/loading_1.gif) no-repeat; display:inline-block; width:70px; height:30px; padding-left:25px;"> Loading ... </div>');
        }
        else
        {
            obj.find(".loading").hide();
        }
    }

    function makeMeThink( think )
    {
        if ( $this.is(".ajax-loading") )
        {
            _think($this,think);
        }
        else
        {
            _think($this, think);
        }
    }

    options = $.extend({}, options); // make options not null - ridiculous, but still.
    // read more about ajax events
    var newoptions = $.extend({
        beforeSend: function()
        {
            invokeFunc(options.beforeSend, null);
            makeMeThink(true);
        },

        complete: function()
        {
            invokeFunc(options.complete);
            makeMeThink(false);
        },
        success:function(result)
        {
            invokeFunc(options.success);
            if ( options.load )
            {
                $this.html(result);
            }
        }

    }, options);

    $.ajax(newoptions);
};
1

If you don't want to write your own code, there are also a lot of plugins that do just that:

1

If you plan to use a loader everytime you make a server request, you can use the following pattern.

 jTarget.ajaxloader(); // (re)start the loader
 $.post('/libs/jajaxloader/demo/service/service.php', function (content) {
     jTarget.append(content); // or do something with the content
 })
 .always(function () {
     jTarget.ajaxloader("stop");
 });

This code in particular uses the jajaxloader plugin (which I just created)

https://github.com/lingtalfi/JAjaxLoader/

1

My ajax code looks like this, in effect, I have just commented out async: false line and the spinner shows up.

$.ajax({
        url: "@Url.Action("MyJsonAction", "Home")",
        type: "POST",
        dataType: "json",
        data: {parameter:variable},
        //async: false, 

        error: function () {
        },

        success: function (data) {
          if (Object.keys(data).length > 0) {
          //use data 
          }
          $('#ajaxspinner').hide();
        }
      });

I am showing the spinner within a function before the ajax code:

$("#MyDropDownID").change(function () {
        $('#ajaxspinner').show();

For Html, I have used a font awesome class:

<i id="ajaxspinner" class="fas fa-spinner fa-spin fa-3x fa-fw" style="display:none"></i>

Hope it helps someone.

0

You can always use Block UI jQuery plugin which does everything for you, and it even blocks the page of any input while the ajax is loading. In case that the plugin seems to not been working, you can read about the right way to use it in this answer. Check it out.

protected by Community Mar 4 '12 at 13:58

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