48

So far I have a PHP class with the constructor

public function __construct ($identifier = NULL)
{
 // Return me.
if ( $identifier != NULL )
{
  $this->emailAddress = $identifier;
  if ($this->loadUser() )
    return $this;      
  else
  {
// registered user requested , but not found ! 
return false;
  }
}

the functionality of loadUser is to look up the database for a particular email address. When i set the identifier to some email that i'm sure it's not in the database; the first IF is get passed, and goes to the first ELSE. here the constructor should return FALSE; but instead, it returns an object of the class with all NULL values !

how do i prevent this? thanks

EDIT:

thank you all for the answers. that was quite fast ! I see that the OOP way is to throw an Exception. So a throw one, my question changes that what should i do with the exception?? php.net's manual is pretty confusing !

    // Setup the user ( we assume he is a user first. referees, admins are   considered users too )
    try { $him = new user ($_emailAddress);
    } catch (Exception $e_u) { 
      // try the groups database
      try { $him = new group ($_emailAddress); 
      } catch (Exception $e_g) {
          // email address was not in any of them !!  
        }
    }
3
  • 14
    A constructor should not explicitly return anything. If you need to signal failure, then throw an exception which the calling code can catch. – Marc B Jul 27 '11 at 18:50
  • 5
    You should have written an answer Marc B, I would have up voted you. – MitMaro Jul 27 '11 at 18:52
  • The most voted and accepted answer is far from being the best answer. Please consider changing the accepted answer. – slepic Aug 5 '19 at 15:43
78

Constructors don't get return values; they serve entirely to instantiate the class.

Without restructuring what you are already doing, you may consider using an exception here.

public function __construct ($identifier = NULL)
{
  $this->emailAddress = $identifier;
  $this->loadUser();
}

private function loadUser ()
{
    // try to load the user
    if (/* not able to load user */) {
        throw new Exception('Unable to load user using identifier: ' . $this->identifier);
    }
}

Now, you can create a new user in this fashion.

try {
    $user = new User('user@example.com');
} catch (Exception $e) {
    // unable to create the user using that id, handle the exception
}
4
  • This answer only proposes solution to the semantic problem with return statement in constructor. But it does not point out that the approach is fundamentaly wrong and that entities should not be constructed/loaded this way. – slepic Aug 5 '19 at 15:39
  • @slepic I would not do it this way either. However, I think you will find that opinions and practices vary widely across the world of programming. Several ORMs execute queries in surprising places — such as in property accessors. "Should" and "should not" in this context are subjective. – erisco Aug 13 '19 at 14:35
  • Where serveral ORMs execute queries is absolutely irrelevant as to how entity objects are constructed. Show me any widely used ORM that constructs entities this way, please. Your constructor approach is fundamentaly wrong and there is nothing subjective about it. There are objective reasons for this statemenet and I'm not gonna repeat them here, since I wrote them in my other post(s) already. Feel free to read them through... – slepic Aug 14 '19 at 15:22
  • You have a particular set of preferences @slepic and that is fine. I do not agree that those are the only justifiable preferences in every circumstance, and thus I do not agree that they are objective. We have different ideas of what "fundamentally" means. Thankfully for everyone, SO allows for multiple answers. – erisco Aug 26 '19 at 20:52
9

The best you can do is what Steve has suggested. Never create constructors that do any job other then assigning constructor parameters to the object properties, maybe create some default ones, but nothing else. Constructors are meant to create a fully functional object. Such an object must always work as expected after its instantiation. A user has email, name and probably some other properties. When you want to instantiate a user object, give all those properties to its constructor. Throwing exceptions is not a good way either. An exception is meant to be thrown under exceptional conditions. Asking for a user by email is nothing exceptional, even if you eventualy figure out that no such user exists. Exception could be for example if you ask for a user by email = '' (unless that is a regular state in your system, but id rather suggest emails to be null in those cases). To get all those properties for a user object you should have a factory (or a repository if you prefer) object (yes, an object - it is a bad practice to use static whatever) Private constructor is a bad practice either (you'll need a static method anyway and as i already stated, statics are very bad)

so the result should be something like this:

class User {
  private $name;
  private $email;
  private $otherprop;

  public function __construct($name, $email, $otherprop = null) {
    $this->name = $name;
    $this->email = $email;
    $this->otherprop = $otherprop;
  }
}

class UserRepository {
  private $db;

  public function __construct($db) {
    $this->db = $db; //this is what constructors should only do
  }

  public function getUserByEmail($email) {
    $sql = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE email = $email"; //do some quoting here
    $data = $this->db->fetchOneRow($sql); //supose email is unique in the db
    if($data) {
      return new User($data['name'], $data['email'], $data['otherprop']);
    } else {
      return null;
    }
  }
}

$repository = new UserRepository($database); //suppose we have users stored in db
$user = $repository->getUserByEmail('whatever@wherever.com');
if($user === null) {
  //show error or whatever you want to do in that case
} else {
  //do the job with user object
}

See? no statics, no exception, simple constructors and very readable, testable and modificable

8

The constructor is suppose to create an object. Since in php booleans are not considered to be objects the only option is null. Otherwise use a workaround i.e. write a static method which creates the actual object.

public static function CheckAndCreate($identifier){
  $result = self::loadUser();
  if($result === true){
    return new EmailClassNameHere();
  }else{
    return false;
  }
}
3

A constructor cannot return anything but the object it is attempting to create. If the instantiation doesn't complete properly, you'll be left with a class instance full of NULL properties as you've discovered.

If the object loads in an incomplete or error state, I would suggest setting a property to indicate that.

// error status property
public $error = NULL;

public function __construct ($identifier = NULL)
{
 // Return me.
if ( $identifier != NULL )
{
  $this->emailAddress = $identifier;
  if (!$this->loadUser() )
  {
   // registered user requested , but not found ! 
   $this->error = "user not found";
  }
}

When instantiating the object then, you can check if it has an error status:

$obj = new MyObject($identifier);
if (!empty($obj->error)) {
   // something failed.
}

Another (perhaps better) alternative is to throw an exception in the constructor, and wrap the instantiation in a try/catch.

1
  • This is not good, the object is supposed to represent a user. What you've done is an object that represents a user "promise" that can fail, you then have to check the error on every occasion. Otherwise you risk working with a user that is actualy not a user. Exceptions are not good either. because looking for user by id and not finding it is nothing exceptional, it happens all the time. Use exceptions ONLY if you are interested in the stack trace! And that should more or less happen only if your code is broken and needs fixing. – slepic Aug 5 '19 at 15:31
2

Why not simply pass the results into the constructor needed to build the object, rather than try to make the constructor fail sometimes?

Even if you could make it fail sometimes, you will still need to check after calling the constructor to ensure it actually did construct, and in those lines, you could just call the ->loadUser() and pass the results into the constructor.

A good hint someone one told me, "always give the constructor what it needs to build the object, don't make it go looking for it."

public function __construct ($emailInTheDatabase, $otherFieldNeeded)
{
    $this->emailAddress = $emailInTheDatabase;
    $this->otherField = $otherFieldNeeded;
}
5
  • The whole point of a good class half the time is that you don't have to fiddle with fetching the data every time -- that's what the class is for. If I have to fetch the data before creating the class, I'm defeating part of the purpose of the class – Stephen R Aug 1 '19 at 23:00
  • @StephenR thats far from true. You are fetching the data everytime either way. The only difference is where you do it. If you do it in constructor. Then you have no other means to fetch the data then the one in the constructor. On other hand if you put the fetching outside the constructor, you can have multiple ways of fetching the user - by email, by id, by some other complex condition, you name it... you can even fetch many users data with one query and construct many user objects from it. You would never be able to do that when the fetching is inside the constructor... – slepic Aug 5 '19 at 6:40
  • 1
    @StephenR shall I add that maybe you dont understand, that you are not supposed to instantiace the user objects yourself, there should be another class that takes care for the efficient way of fetching the data from db and constructing the user objects from that. Believe me i know I am talking about, I was working in a company where they had exactly this - entity classes with constructors accepting id, and the contructor would then fetch the entity data from db. Hunders, if not thousands of queries and at least a second of waiting just to load homepage. And nobody knows how to get rid of it... – slepic Aug 5 '19 at 6:49
  • @slepic I partly agree with you -- but the constructor is not the only place to pull data. Look at PHP's DateTime::createFromFormat() static function. Perhaps my comment was poorly phrased. I read this Answer as suggesting that the data should be pulled each time in procedural code and passed in, which I maintain is self-defeating. But that data can still be drawn outside the actual __constructor function. Other answers on this question explain this better – Stephen R Aug 5 '19 at 14:58
  • 1
    @StephenR i see what you mean. And yes, if the fetching is in static methods and not the constructor, then it can work. EXCEPT, the static loaders have a hidden dependency on the db connection. The credentials for connection have to either be hardcoded inside the class, or pulled from some global variable under the hood. That decreases flexibility, readability and testability. The DateTime class does not depend on a db connection that can be set up differently, so it can afford to put this in a static method. I've actualy posted my own answer to this question, check it to see how I'd do it. – slepic Aug 5 '19 at 15:26
2

I'm really surprised that for 4 years none of the 22k viewers suggested creating private constructor and a method that attempts to create an object like this:

class A {
    private function __construct () {
        echo "Created!\n";
    }
    public static function attemptToCreate ($should_it_succeed) {
        if ($should_it_succeed) {
            return new A();
        }
        return false;
    }
}

var_dump(A::attemptToCreate(0)); // bool(false)
var_dump(A::attemptToCreate(1)); // object(A)#1 (0) {}
//! new A(); - gives error

This way you get either an object or false (you can also make it return null). Catching both situations is now very easy:

$user = User::attemptToCreate('email@example.com');
if(!$user) { // or if(is_null($user)) in case you return null instead of false
    echo "Not logged.";
} else {
    echo $user->name; // e.g.
}

You can test it right here: http://ideone.com/TDqSyi

I find my solution more convenient to use than throwing and catching exceptions.

3
  • @mightyuhu did exactly that and got several upvotes. – Wilt Aug 12 '15 at 9:26
  • @Wilt Yes, I see it now... but he didn't mention the private constructor at all... – Al.G. Aug 12 '15 at 10:52
  • I don't see that other answer. Deleted? At any rate, this is a good answer, and what I have done in a few instances – Stephen R Aug 2 '19 at 0:32
0

thanks for all the comments and solutions. here is what i done to fix the problem: (i hope it helps others)

// Setup the user ( we assume he is a user first. referees, admins are considered users too )
    try {
      $him = new user ($_emailAddress); 
      // check the supplied password 
      $pass_ok = $him->auth($_Password);

      // check the activation status 
      $active_ok = $him->makeActive();

    } catch (Exception $e_u) { 
      // try the groups database
      try { 
      $him = new group ($_emailAddress);
      // check the supplied password 
      $pass_ok = $him->auth($_Password);
              //var_dump ($pass_ok);

      // check the activation status 
      $active_ok = $him->makeActive();
      } catch (Exception $e_g) {
          // email address was not in any of them !!
          $pass_ok = false; $active_ok = false;
        }
    }
0

I wouldn't put too much in the construct. You should consider a static functin that create the User (factory) instead of putting everything in the constructor. Thus, you can still use your user object without having to call implicitly the load function. This will save you pain.

public function __construct(){}

public function setIdentifier($value){
    $this->identifier = $value;
}

public function load(){
    // whatever you need to load here
    //...
    throw new UserParameterNotSetException('identifier not set');
    // ...
    // if user cannot be loaded properly
    throw new UserNotFoundException('could not found user');
}

public static function loadUser($identifier){
    $user = new User();
    $user->setIdentifier($identifier);
    $user->load();
    return $user;
}

Sample usage:

$user = new User(); 
try{
    $user->setIdentifier('identifier');
    $user->load();
}
catch(UserParameterNotSetException $e){
    //...
}
catch(UserNotFoundException $e){
    // do whatever you need to do when user is not found
}

// With the factory static function:
try{
    $user2 = User::loadUser('identifier');
}
catch(UserParameterNotSetException $e){
    //...
}
catch(UserNotFoundException $e){
    // do whatever you need to do when user is not found
}

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