2

I have two classes defined as such:

public class Questionnaire
    {
        public int QuestionnaireID { get; set; }
        public string Title { get; set; }
        public bool Active { get; set; }
        public virtual ICollection<Question> Questions { get; set; }
        public virtual ICollection<Vendor> Vendors { get; set; }
    }

public class Vendor
    {
        public int VendorID { get; set; }

        public string VendorName { get; set; }

        public virtual ICollection<Questionnaire> OpenQuestionnaires { get; set; }

        public virtual ICollection<Questionnaire> SubmittedQuestionnaires { get; set; }

        public virtual ICollection<QuestionnaireUser> QuestionnaireUsers { get; set; }
    }

I beleive this is the correct way to establish a many-to-many relationship between these classes, and when the project is built, I would expect three tables to be created.

However, when I attempt to to relate one Questionnaire to two different Vendors, I receive the following error when attempting to save the changes (context.SaveChanges()):

*Multiplicity constraint violated. The role 'Vendor_OpenQuestionnaires_Source' of the relationship 'QuestionnaireApp.Models.Vendor_OpenQuestionnaires' has multiplicity 1 or 0..1.*

If I assign a Questionnaire to only one Vendor, save the changes and then assign it to another and again save changes I no longer get the error; however the Questionaire is then related only to the last Vendor to which it was assigned, indicating that (at best) there is a one-to-many relationship being created.

I'm hoping that there is something wrong with the way I'm declaring the many-to-many relationship between these classes, or perhaps there is something I need to add to the context class to "encourage" the relationsip, but perhaps many-to-many relationships like this are not supported, or cannot be created using "Code First"?

Thank you for your time,

Jason

  • I am unfamiliar with either technology you're using, but in SQL to make a many to many relationship you need a bridging table which has a one to many with both tables and therefore aggregates the many to many. I do not see such a structure in your design.. – Jimmy Hoffa Jul 27 '11 at 19:22
  • I think you need to tell EF explicitly that's a many-to-many relationship where it boot straps EF. – Chris Marisic Jul 27 '11 at 19:23
  • In general, if you have the ICollection<T> for the corresponding child collection in each parent object, EF will automiatically generate the intervening briding table for you based on convention. The EF Model hides the intervening table. – Jim Wooley Jul 28 '11 at 1:55
2

If you don't have any Fluent API code your expected mapping relies on EF Code First conventions. The convention which you expect to kick in here is the AssociationInverseDiscoveryConvention. Now if you look in Intellisense (and probably also documentation) it says about this convention:

Convention to detect navigation properties to be inverses of each other when only one pair of navigation properties exists between the related types.

Now, that's the problem: You don't have only "one pair" of navigation properties between Questionnaire and Vendor. You have two collections in Vendor refering to Questionnaire and one collection in Questionnaire refering to Vendor. The result is that this convention doesn't get applied and EF maps actually three one-to-many relationships with only one end exposed as navigation property in the model.

Moreover the mapping you want to achieve is not possible with your model: You cannot map the one end Questionnaire.Vendors to the two ends Vendor.OpenQuestionnaires and Vendor.SubmittedQuestionnaires.

One workaround is to change your model the following way:

public class Vendor
{
    public int VendorID { get; set; }

    public string VendorName { get; set; }

    [NotMapped]
    public IEnumerable<Questionnaire> OpenQuestionnaires
    {
        get { return Questionnaires.Where(q => q.IsActive); }
    }

    [NotMapped]
    public IEnumerable<Questionnaire> SubmittedQuestionnaires
    {
        get { return Questionnaires.Where(q => !q.IsActive); }
    }

    public virtual ICollection<Questionnaire> Questionnaires { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<QuestionnaireUser> QuestionnaireUsers { get; set; }
}

Now Vendor.Questionnaires is mapped to Questionnaire.Vendors (AssociationInverseDiscoveryConvention should detect this) and the helper properties OpenQuestionnaires and SubmittedQuestionnaires allow you to pull out the selected items. (I'm not sure if IsActive is your distinguishing flag. Otherwise you have to introduce some new flag.)

The [NotMapped] attribute is just here to make it explicite. It is probably not necessary because EF won't map IEnumerable collections and readonly properties with only a getter anyway.

  • Thank-you for the detailed explanation. As it turns out, I was able to get what I needed using the change I posted above, but I'm sure I'll benefit from the extra insight you have provided for the inner workings of EF. – jasongullickson Jul 28 '11 at 16:21
1

Go figure, after an hour or so of searching, I go and find the exact answer 30 seconds after I post my question.

The solution was to add the following to the context class:

modelBuilder.Entity<Vendor>()
                .HasMany<Questionnaire>(x => x.OpenQuestionnaires)
                .WithMany(x => x.Vendors)
                .Map(x =>
                    {
                        x.MapLeftKey("vID");
                        x.MapRightKey("qID");
                        x.ToTable("VendorQuestionnaires");
                    });

I found the answer by reading this Stack Overflow post: EF Code First Many-to-Many not working

  • I see, then you have only a many-to-many relationship between Vendor and Questionnaire through the OpenQuestionnaires property. What about the SubmittedQuestionnaires? Does this collection belong to another one-to-many relationship between Vendor and Questionnaire? At least I'd expect that EF will map this by convention. – Slauma Jul 28 '11 at 16:55
  • A given questionnaire can be in OpenQuestionnaires or SubmittedQuestionnaires not both. So with this change I'm able to do this and get the expected results, I don't completely understand what it's doing "under the hood" yet but it appears to be working :) – jasongullickson Jul 28 '11 at 17:15
  • Never mind, if you've tested it and it works for you then it's fine. No doubt, it's a valid mapping what you have above. What was confusing me is that OpenQuestionnaires and SubmittedQuestionnaires are somehow "asymmetric" now: You can navigate through the Vendors collection from a Questionnaire to the Vendors which have this Questionnaire as an open Questionnaire but not to the Vendors who have this Questionnaire submitted because there is no exposed relationship from Questionnaire to the SubmittedQuestionnaires collection in the Vendor class. – Slauma Jul 28 '11 at 18:48

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