1

I localized problem of my Delphi service app.

Now I have one test server with Windows Server 2019, RDP.

Simple test code, connecting to local TCP server and disconnect:

for i := 1 to 1000000 div 100 do

begin

sleep(100);

Caption := 'STRESS TEST: ' + inttostr(i * 100);
Application.ProcessMessages;

for j := 1 to 100 do
begin

  thread := TThread.CreateAnonymousThread(
  procedure
  Var tcpClient : TIdTcpClient;
  begin

      try
        tcpClient := TIdTCPClient.Create(nil);
        tcpClient.Host := '127.0.0.1';
        tcpClient.Port := RollControl_Svc.TCPServer.Bindings[0].Port
        tcpClient.Connect;
        tcpClient.IOHandler.ReadTimeout := 1000;
      finally
        FreeAndNil(tcpClient);
      end;

  end);
  thread.FreeOnTerminate := (j > 1) and (j < 100);

  if thread.FreeOnTerminate then thread.Start else
  begin
    thread.Start;
    thread.WaitFor;
    thread.Free;
  end;

end;

After 20K operations on the test machine, an error occurs:

Thread creation error: Not enough memory resources are available to process this command.

At my work with the machine everything is fine, 1M operations have been done. I have Delphi XE3, latest Indy version, what's wrong? Maybe there are some peculiarities when working in RDP?

5
  • "What's wrong?" - the error message is precise: for your running process the memory is limited and you've occupied so much of it that you should free some of it again before asking for more. Just think of your "at my work" machine having 16 GiB of RAM and the "test server" having only 512 MiB of RAM. And services have much tighter limitations on top.
    – AmigoJack
    Jul 23 at 14:20
  • Process in memory did not grow, it size only 100M. There no memory leaks, count of handles and threads are not growing. On one mashine it works fine, on second crashed with this error Jul 23 at 14:52
  • 3
    There are many strange things in your code. Let me just mention one of those: tcpClient := TIdTCPClient.Create(nil); MUST be the line BEFORE the try. Jul 23 at 15:10
  • @Andreas Rejbrand I agree, but this does not affect the problem. I moved tcpClient := TIdTCPClient.Create(nil); out try block and problem is not gone Jul 23 at 16:56
  • @НиколайНевзоров: I know. Jul 23 at 17:02
2

This issue is not specific to Indy. The code shown has the potential of running thousands of threads simultaneously, each one taking up a kernel object, using a default stack size of 1-4MB, etc. Add that up, and that is a LOT of memory and system resources potentially being used. So, it makes sense that as the loop progresses, new threads could fail with ERROR_NOT_ENOUGH_MEMORY over time.

One option to mitigate this is to reduce the stack size of each thread, since this code is doing very little work in each thread, so doesn't need a large stack. TThread did not offer this option on a per-thread basis until Delphi 10.3 Rio, but the Win32 API has always supported it (see How to set stack size in TThread?). Or, you can set the default stack size globally in the project setting for the whole app, or in code via {$MINSTACKSIZE}.

Another option is to reduce the number of threads that are running simultaneously. Such as by using a queue of tasks run by a thread pool that limits the number of running tasks.

1

Yes, it was no Indy

Next code:

  no := 0;
  List := TList.Create;

  while true do
  begin

    Caption := 'STRESS TEST: ' + inttostr(no);
    Application.ProcessMessages;

    List.Clear;

    for j := 1 to 1000 do
    begin
      inc(no);

      Thread := TThread.CreateAnonymousThread(
        procedure
        begin
        end
        );

      thread.FreeOnTerminate := false;
      thread.Start;
      List.Add(thread)
    end;

    while List.Count > 0 do
    begin
     TThread(List[0]).WaitFor;
     TThread(List[0]).Free;
     List.Delete(0);
    end;

  end;

After 400K operations, an error occurs on the test machine. I didn't understand why. Clean code, all threads are created and destroyed in a loop. Local test passes 10 million operations, test PC only 400K and fails

1
  • 1
    Antivirus can cause problems for micro benchmarks / stress tests like this - often they hook the kernel so they are notified on thread creation / destruction and can cause additional resource allocation/usage behind the scenes. The effect usually goes away when threads do actual work.
    – Brian
    Jul 24 at 10:39
0

Cannot reproduce this because the host is on a local network i assume. this is likely down to the amount of ram you have installed. If it's graphically intensive it could also be down to vram(graphics card memory). Best thing to do is to replicate the code but for a normal basic website and if it works you know its a ram/vram problem

1
  • How can a website create threads?
    – AmigoJack
    Jul 23 at 18:30

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