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Suppose i have a series of elements in array as [2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0]. I can add any number digit before or after or in middle of number in array such that the array become contiguous and return the smallest minimum element. for above array we can make it as [21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30] and min element is 21. Number will always be positive, not negative numbers and floats will be there in array.

Another example - [6 7 8 9 4 4 2 3] Answer - [36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43] Min - 36

22
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    Can you explain your algorithm
    – user15801675
    Jul 25 at 9:10
  • @Sujay Are U Asking my approach or about Question? if ur asking my approach what i thought was if 2 consecutive elements are same like in 2nd example ill take value less than that in above case 4 is conecutive 2 times so i took 3. I'm new to coding and still learning so no idea beyind this and struck
    – Noob
    Jul 25 at 9:18
  • @PrantaPalit. I think it's because there are 2 consecutive 2. So the base number is 2.
    – Corralien
    Jul 25 at 9:22
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    The problem cannot be solved without adding some constraints and relaxing others. For instance, the mini array [5, 3] can be made continuous in more than 1 way, for example as [52, 53] and as [35, 36]. Some minimality constraint is needed. Also, some sequences have no solution unless the "inserting a digit" is changed into "inserting any number of digits". Consider for example [123, 5]. A solution like [1234,1235] is currently invalid, since it needs 3 digit-insertions per number. The problem talks about arrays of "elements", but I doubt inputs with negative numbers, floats are allowed.
    – Koen AIS
    Jul 25 at 9:43
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    Please update your problem description. It says "a digit", not "any number of digits". It says "return the minimum element (of the resulting array)", not "return the smallest minimum element that is possible" It talks about "(any) elements", while your comments suddenly change that to "non-negative integers". I'm am sorry about my type in "continuous", especially so because the contiguous property was & is the only one that is clear from the current description. I've solved it in the mean-time. I'll post it if you clean up your description.
    – Koen AIS
    Jul 25 at 12:27
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The following code is a solution. It's not thoroughly tested, but it does what it is supposed to do for the examples given in the problem statement.

test(new int[]{2 ,2 ,3 ,4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ,9 ,0});
// output: [21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30], min = 21
test(new int[]{6, 7, 8, 9, 4, 4, 2, 3}); 
// output: [36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43], min = 36

It's in Java, but it shouldn't be hard to convert to another language of choice.

Here's the test method:

public void test(int[] arr)
{
    int min = modifyAndMinimize(arr);
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(arr) + ", min = " + min);
}

Array modifier:

/**
 * Modifies the numbers (which must be non-negative) in arr such that the new version
 * is contiguous, meaning that for every subsequence [u, v], v - u = 1.
 * The only type of modification that is applied is to insert digits into the elements of arr.
 * This can be done in many ways, but this function chooses the way that results in
 * the smallest possible first element (which this function returns).
 */
public int modifyAndMinimize(int[] arr) {
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length - 1; i++) {
        int u = arr[i], v = arr[i + 1];
        int minU = modifyAndMinimize(3, u, v, "", "", 1); // hardcoded 3 out of laziness, but it's really a function of the number of digits of u and v
        if (v != minU + 1)
            arr[i + 1] = minU+ 1;
        if (u != minU) {
            arr[i] = minU;
            i = -1; // lazy way of moving back to fix the previous numbers
        }
    }
    return arr[0];
}

Now the crux, i.e. the function that "fixes" two consecutive elements (the idea is simple, but it's tricky to implement and impossible to debug late at night as I found out yesterday):

/** 
 * Finds the smallest u' and v' such that v' - u' = diff, where u' and v' are modified versions
 * of u and v obtained by inserting digits.
 *
 * The approach is essentially the common subtraction algorithm, but instead of computing the
 * result of v - u, it's given the result and asked to compute u' and v' such that v' - u'
 * is the result (diff).
 */
public int modifyAndMinimize(int maxDepth, int u, int v, String doneU, String doneV, int diff) {
    if (maxDepth < 0) return Integer.MAX_VALUE;

    // if v - u == diff, we're done
    if (v - u == diff)
        return Integer.parseInt(u + doneU);

    // v and/or u need to be modified, but perhaps their last digits are already ok
    if ((v - u - diff) % 10 == 0)
        return modifyAndMinimize(maxDepth - 1, u / 10, v / 10, u % 10 + doneU, (v % 10) + doneV, diff / 10);

    // they're not ok. To fix this, try appending the appropriate digit to u and try appending
    // the appropriate digit to v. Choose the option that results in the smallest modified u.

    int appendToU = v % 10 - diff;
    int carry = appendToU / 10;
    appendToU %= 10;
    if (appendToU < 0) {
        appendToU += 10;
        carry--;
    }
    int option1 = modifyAndMinimize(maxDepth - 1, u, v / 10, appendToU + doneU, (v % 10) + doneV, diff / 10 - carry);

    int appendToV = u % 10 + diff;
    carry = appendToV / 10;
    appendToV %= 10;
    if (appendToV < 0) {
        appendToV += 10;
        carry--;
    }
    int option2 = modifyAndMinimize(maxDepth - 1, u / 10, v, (u % 10) + doneU, appendToV + doneV, diff / 10 + carry);

    return Math.min(option1, option2);
}

It's very well possible there's a much nicer approach than to use brute force to decide whether a digit should be added to either u or v (it's exponential in the number of digits, so it's linear in the numbers themselves). If so, I missed it.

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