12

I would like to have a concept requiring an arbitrary vector as the return type:

template<typename T>
concept HasVector = requires (T t) {
    { T.vec() } -> std::same_as<std::vector<int>>; //works
    { T.vec() } -> std::same_as<std::vector<foo>>; //want to put something arbitrary in here
}

Such that we would have something like the following:

class A {
std::vector<int> vec() { /* ... */}
}

class B {
std::vector<double> vec() { /* ... */}
}

static_assert(HasVector<A>);
static_assert(HasVector<B>);

Moreover, it would be even nicer to require a vector as the return type whose value type satisfies some other concept, i.e.


template<typename T>
concept Arithmetic = // as in the standard

template<typename T>
concept HasArithmeticVector = requires (T t ) {
    { T. vec() } -> std::same_as<std::vector<Arithmetic>>;

Is there such a way to put this in names of concepts?

1
  • If only template<typename T, concept C=Anything> concept HasVector = requires could exist. Jul 26 at 15:17
23

We start by writing a variable template to check if a type specializes a template:

template <typename T, template <typename...> class Z>
inline constexpr bool is_specialization_of = false;

template <template <typename...> class Z, class... Args>
inline constexpr bool is_specialization_of<Z<Args...>, Z> = true;

Which we can turn into a concept:

template <typename T, template <typename...> class Z>
concept Specializes = is_specialization_of<T, Z>;

Which we can then use to implement another concept:

template<typename T>
concept HasVector = requires (T t) {
    { t.vec() } -> Specializes<std::vector>;
};

If you want to then do further checking, that's just adding more requirements.

template<typename T>
concept HasVector = requires (T t) {
    { t.vec() } -> Specializes<std::vector>;

    // or something along these lines
    requires Arithmetic<decay_t<decltype(t.vec()[0])>>;
    requires Arithmetic<range_value_t<decltype(t.vec())>>;
    // etc.
};
3
  • Specializes stretches the intended design rule for concepts; they are supposed to be describing a concept, not just testing syntax; and calling "this class specializes some other class" as a concept is a bit of a stretch. No? Jul 26 at 15:15
  • @Yakk-AdamNevraumont Also, Specializes (and the base is_specialization_of) cannot currently be made fully general. Jul 26 at 20:12
  • @Deduplicator to be explicit, Specializes<std::array> won't work, and practically cannot. You can do SpecializesTs<std::vector> and SpecializesTA<std::array> type stupidity. Jul 26 at 20:23
6
#include <concepts>
#include <vector>

template<typename T>
concept Arithmetic = std::integral<T> || std::floating_point<T>;

template<typename T>
concept HasVector = requires (T t) {
  []<Arithmetic U, typename A>(std::vector<U,A> const&){}(t.vec());
};

Demo.

4
  • This might accept a type that has a conversion operator to vector<int>? Jul 26 at 11:15
  • 2
    @MarcGlisse. No, that is impossible.
    – 康桓瑋
    Jul 26 at 11:28
  • Uh, you are right. It does detect a class that derives from std::vector though (struct Vec:std::vector<int>{};). Jul 26 at 11:43
  • 2
    @Yakk-AdamNevraumont Fixed :-)
    – Barry
    Jul 26 at 15:07
-2

As long as vec() is a public class method:

template<typename T> struct is_vector { std::false_type operator()(); };

template<typename T, typename A> struct is_vector<std::vector<T, A>> {
    std::true_type operator()();
};

template<typename T>
concept HasVector = requires(T t) {
    { is_vector<decltype(t.vec())>{}() } -> std::same_as<std::true_type>;
};

class A {
public:
    std::vector<int> vec() {return {}; }
};

class B {
public:
    std::vector<double> vec() {return {}; }
};

class C {
};

static_assert(HasVector<A>);
static_assert(HasVector<B>);

6
  • 2
    That is a bad way to write a type trait (the convention is that is_vector inherits from true_type or false_type, not that it provides a call operator??) and that is a bad way to check a type trait (even with the call operator, you could just directly check the result, you don't have to go through this side-step of constraining the type to true_type - when the fact that it's true_type shouldn't even matter).
    – Barry
    Jul 25 at 20:56
  • is_vector does not inherit from anything, or provides any call operator. Jul 25 at 21:04
  • 2
    I'm aware that it doesn't inherit from anything - that's why I said that the convention is that it should. But what do you mean it doesn't provide any call operator - that's what your code does. It has a call operator. That's what operator() is.
    – Barry
    Jul 25 at 21:37
  • 3
    To be more clear, @SamVarshavchik, your code works but it looks like a c++03 solution connected to a c++11 decltype solution grafted onto c++20 features. And the c++11 style code isn't great; replace { std::true_type operator()(); }; with :std::true_type {};, for example. But even if we cleaned up the c++11 part of your solution... if we have c++20, why not do it the cleaner c++20 ways anyhow? Jul 26 at 15:10
  • 1
    @SamVarshavchik "... now has to employ the services of std::derived_from" No you don't. Have you never used a type trait before? You would just check is_vector<T>::value. Your answer isn't "more basic" - it's actually more involved.
    – Barry
    Jul 26 at 21:27

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