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Hi I try to achieve an animation like here https://ludmillamaury.com/. When you hover over the part "selected works" there is shown an image. I tried to look what they used but I don't find it. I think it's a js library but I don't find which one. He has the same effect: https://olivierguillard.dev/

I'm looking now since hours, but I don't even know what keywords I should look for. Maybe someone can help me!

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3 Answers 3

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So it looks like they have <a> tags that react when you hover over them. This can be done with JavaScript or CSS, but what you need to use depends on what you want the reaction to be.

If you want to make the image show up around your cursor like it does on those websites, you have to either use an event listener or a cursor like someone else said. That being said, the websites shown didn't use a cursor, because I can still see my normal pointer cursor there.

Here's how I did it with JavaScript and a bit of CSS (the image shows up and moves with your cursor, and disappears when you stop hovering over the link).

HTML:

<div id="container">
  <a href="" data-src="road.png" class="hover">
    <h1>Hover here!</h1>
  </a>
</div>

Make sure your href is the link you want people to go to when they click it. If you don't want a link (I assumed you do because both websites you showed have them), just change it to a <div> or something. The data-src attribute here is really important, because it tells the JavaScript what picture to use. There are other ways to do this, but I personally like the dataset the best for sharing small element-specific bits of information between the HTML and the JavaScript. It doesn't really matter what you call it, as long as it starts with "data-" (eg data-image or data-href).

CSS:

#container {
  position: relative;
}
.followMouse {
  z-index: -1;
  position: absolute;
}

followMouse is going to be the class we add to the image when it's shown. I gave it a z-index of -1 so it shows behind the other elements on the page (like in your examples). I also made its position absolute. This is very important. This is what allows us to set its coordinates, and what stops it from messing up other styling on the page. And in order to make sure that works, it's always a good idea to set its parent element (in this case, the element with the id "container") to a relative position.

Now for the fun part! Here are the JavaScript event listeners that make it work:

for (let el of document.querySelectorAll('.hover')) {
  let image = new Image();
  image.src = el.dataset.src;
  image.className = "followMouse";
  el.addEventListener('mouseover',(e)=>{
    document.getElementById('container').append(image);
    image.style.left = `${e.x - (image.width/2)}px`;
    image.style.top = `${e.y - (image.height/2)}px`;
  })
  el.addEventListener('mouseout',(e)=>{
    image.remove();
  })
}
window.addEventListener('mousemove',(e)=> {
  let image = document.querySelector('.followMouse');
  if (image) {
    image.style.left = `${e.x - (image.width/2)}px`;
    image.style.top = `${e.y - (image.height/2)}px`;
  }
})

I used document.querySelectorAll to get all elements with 'hover' as their class, in case you want to do this with multiple elements. To get that data-src attribute, I called for the element's dataset. Basically, do el.dataset. and then whatever you had after the dash (but if it had dashes in it in your HTML, now use camelCase). Then I loaded an image with that attribute as its source and followMouse as its class (which has to be called className in JavaScript because class is already a thing). I didn't append it to the document yet, because then it would show up before the user hovers over the tag. For every element with the 'hover' class, I then added two event listeners: one adds the image to the container when the mouse is over the element, and one removes the image when the mouse is moved away. In the former, I also changed the style property of the image so that its coordinates are half its width left of the mouse and half its height above the mouse--basically, it'll show up with the mouse in the center of it. Since I had to call its 'left' and 'top' CSS attributes from the CSS style of the element, I had to pass in a string with the type of number I was sending. Eg, in the CSS it would be this:

el {
  left: 10px
}

So I need to send in a string like "10px" to the CSS. To do this, I use `` instead of normal double or single quotes so that I can define a string with variables or JavaScript inside of it (the ${insert js here}).

Finally, I added an event listener to the window as a whole to listen for the mouse moving. This time I just called querySelector instead of querySelectorAll because there should only be one element with that class at a time. All this event listener does is check if the image exists (aka if you're hovering over an element that does this stuff), and if it does, update the position of the image so the cursor is still in the center of it.

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    Omg thank you so much! This is best answer I ever get with explanation and it works! I can't tell you how much you helped me!!
    – tmze
    Jul 26, 2021 at 15:48
  • Hi Raphael I struggle here.. creativeandcode.ch/index.html when I scroll down and let's say the portfolio links are in the upper 50vh - de images seem to be too high when I hover it. the position is too up
    – tmze
    Jul 28, 2021 at 23:01
  • I think it has something to do with the scroll behaviour
    – tmze
    Jul 28, 2021 at 23:24
  • @tmze try e.pageY instead of e.y, that might work better! I didn't take into account scroll, sorry Aug 10, 2021 at 3:03
  • Hi Raphael no it still doesn't help. Something went wrong with the position. When I scroll down its okey but when I scroll "back" means back to top. The position is like out of the viewport.
    – tmze
    Aug 15, 2021 at 14:24
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<div class="portfolio">
          <a class="thecococlub" href="project/the-coco-club.html">  <div class="folio" >
                <p>001</p>
                <hr>
                <h3>THE COCO CLUB</h3>
            </div></a>
            <div class="folio" >
                <p>002</p>
                <hr>
                <h3>Tanja Kuriger Fotografie</h3>
            </div>
            <div class="folio">
                <p>003</p>
                <hr>
                <h3>Metall Schmiededesign</h3>
            </div>
            <div class="folio">
                <p>004</p>
                <hr>
                <h3>Creative & Code</h3>
            </div>

            <a href="project/maeva.html">
            <div class="folio">
                <p>005</p>
                <hr>
                <h3>Maeva</h3>
            </div></a>
            <div class="folio">
                <p>006</p>
                <hr>
                <h3>Mint Fashion</h3>
            </div>
        </div>

and the css is:

.thecococlub::before{
  content: " ";
}

.thecococlub::after{
  content: " ";
  background-image: url("../img/thecococlub_500px.png");
  width: 500px;
}
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The most simple approach is to use an image as mouse cursor. You can either use SVG, PNG or GIF (not animated though). To change the cursor on hover you can use the :hover pseudo-selector.

The mouse-cursor image will however be displayed at the bottom-right starting from the "aim". You can use an offset in pixel to "center" the cursor image.

a:hover {
  cursor: url("https://via.placeholder.com/100.png") 50 50, auto;
}


/* for styling purpose only */
body {
  margin: 0;
  height: 100vh;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
}
<a href="#">Hover me!</a>

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