140
class Dad
{
    protected static String me = "dad";

    public void printMe()
    {
        System.out.println(me);
    }
}

class Son extends Dad
{
    protected static String me = "son";
}

public void doIt()
{
    new Son().printMe();
}

The function doIt will print "dad". Is there a way to make it print "son"?

16 Answers 16

52

Yes. But as the variable is concerned it is overwrite (Giving new value to variable. Giving new definition to the function is Override).Just don't declare the variable but initialize (change) in the constructor or static block.

The value will get reflected when using in the blocks of parent class

if the variable is static then change the value during initialization itself with static block,

class Son extends Dad {
    static { 
       me = 'son'; 
    }
}

or else change in constructor.

You can also change the value later in any blocks. It will get reflected in super class

  • 9
    I think the answer should have some code for better readability. Just change the Son implementation to class Son extends Dad { static { me = 'son' } } – Cléssio Mendes Apr 22 '15 at 2:44
  • it won't work. I tried – Dinoop paloli Jun 15 '16 at 8:49
  • can you give me some sample how you tried that?. It is working as how it is intended to work. – Vivek MVK Jun 20 '16 at 5:32
91

In short, no, there is no way to override a class variable.

You do not override class variables in Java you hide them. Overriding is for instance methods. Hiding is different from overriding.

In the example you've given, by declaring the class variable with the name 'me' in class Son you hide the class variable it would have inherited from its superclass Dad with the same name 'me'. Hiding a variable in this way does not affect the value of the class variable 'me' in the superclass Dad.

For the second part of your question, of how to make it print "son", I'd set the value via the constructor. Although the code below departs from your original question quite a lot, I would write it something like this;

public class Person {
    private String name;

    public Person(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public void printName() {
        System.out.println(name);
    }
}

The JLS gives a lot more detail on hiding in section 8.3 - Field Declarations

  • 1
    Override is possible by having a static block in the derived class – siddagrl Sep 24 '13 at 17:23
  • 1
    @siddagrl: can you elaborate ? – Mr_and_Mrs_D Oct 30 '13 at 12:27
  • which of OP's classes is Person supposed to replace in this example? – n611x007 Mar 20 '14 at 18:03
  • 1
    @naxa Son and Dad are supposed to inherit from Person, then call super("Son or Dad"); in their constructors. – Panzercrisis Jun 19 '14 at 16:38
  • Is it considered good or bad to hide variables like that in Java? – Panzercrisis Jun 19 '14 at 16:38
31

Yes, just override the printMe() method:

class Son extends Dad {
        public static final String me = "son";

        @Override
        public void printMe() {
                System.out.println(me);
        }
}
  • what if the library that you are using does not have printMe() method, or even it has that method it's a static method ? – Venkat Sudheer Reddy Aedama Aug 7 '15 at 20:01
  • 1
    To make this a more real life example, you could consider that the "printMe" method could be a very complicated function with logic you don't want to repeat. In this example, you just want to change the name of the person, not the logic that prints it. You should create a method called "getName" which you would override to return "son" and the printMe method would invoke the getName method as part of its printing. – Ring Sep 29 '16 at 15:46
15

You can create a getter and then override that getter. It's particularly useful if the variable you are overriding is a sub-class of itself. Imagine your super class has an Object member but in your sub-class this is now more defined to be an Integer.

class Dad
{
        private static final String me = "dad";

        protected String getMe() {
            return me;
        }

        public void printMe()
        {
                System.out.println(getMe());
        }
}

class Son extends Dad
{
        private static final String me = "son";

        @Override
        protected String getMe() {
            return me;
        }
}

public void doIt()
{
        new Son().printMe(); //Prints "son"
}
10

If you are going to override it I don't see a valid reason to keep this static. I would suggest the use of abstraction (see example code). :

     public interface Person {
        public abstract String getName();
       //this will be different for each person, so no need to make it concrete
        public abstract void setName(String name);
    }

Now we can add the Dad:

public class Dad implements Person {

    private String name;

    public Dad(String name) {
        setName(name);
    }

    @Override
    public final String getName() {
    return name;
    }

    @Override
    public final void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

the son:

public class Son implements Person {

    private String name;

    public Son(String name) {
        setName(name);
    }

    @Override
    public final String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    @Override
    public final void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

and Dad met a nice lady:

public class StepMom implements Person {

    private String name;

    public StepMom(String name) {
        setName(name);
    }

    @Override
    public final String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    @Override
    public final void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Looks like we have a family, lets tell the world their names:

public class ConsoleGUI {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Person> family = new ArrayList<Person>();
        family.add(new Son("Tommy"));
        family.add(new StepMom("Nancy"));
        family.add(new Dad("Dad"));
        for (Person person : family) {
            //using the getName vs printName lets the caller, in this case the
            //ConsoleGUI determine versus being forced to output through the console. 
            System.out.print(person.getName() + " ");
            System.err.print(person.getName() + " ");
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, person.getName());
    }
}

}

System.out Output : Tommy Nancy Dad
System.err is the same as above(just has red font)
JOption Output:
Tommy then
Nancy then
Dad

  • 1
    The OP was regarding changing access to statics. Hence the "me" was a generic "dad" or "son" - something that doesnt need creating for every dad or son and hence is a static. – RichieHH May 11 '14 at 17:51
  • Yeah, your right, I didn't see that it was static. Haha, that would change my answer to about 100 less lines of code,l if answered at all. Thanks for the heads up – nckbrz May 12 '14 at 22:09
6

This looks like a design flaw.

Remove the static keyword and set the variable for example in the constructor. This way Son just sets the variable to a different value in his constructor.

  • 1
    whats incorrect about this? If the 'me' member variable is supposed to be overridable in your design, then patrick's is the correct solution – Chii Mar 26 '09 at 11:26
  • Actually, if the value of me is the same for every instance, just removing 'static' would be fine. Initialization doesn't have to be in constructor. – Nate Parsons Apr 3 '09 at 7:20
  • Right, although technically (in bytecode) I think it's almost the same ;-) – Patrick Cornelissen Apr 3 '09 at 9:40
4

Though it is true that class variables may only be hidden in subclasses, and not overridden, it is still possible to do what you want without overriding printMe () in subclasses, and reflection is your friend. In the code below I omit exception handling for clarity. Please note that declaring me as protected does not seem to have much sense in this context, as it is going to be hidden in subclasses...

class Dad
  {
    static String me = "dad";

    public void printMe ()
      {
        java.lang.reflect.Field field = this.getClass ().getDeclaredField ("me");
        System.out.println (field.get (null));
      }
  }
  • Very interesting, Java.lang.reflect huh?... +1 – nckbrz Apr 14 '14 at 2:21
3
class Dad
{
    protected static String me = "dad";

    public void printMe()
    {
        System.out.println(me);
    }
}

class Son extends Dad
{
    protected static String _me = me = "son";
}

public void doIt()
{
    new Son().printMe();
}

... will print "son".

  • isn't this the same as the original question? – Corley Brigman Oct 18 '13 at 18:15
  • CAn you explain why ? (in your answer) – Mr_and_Mrs_D Oct 30 '13 at 12:38
2

only by overriding printMe():

class Son extends Dad 
{
    public void printMe() 
    {
        System.out.println("son");
    }
}

the reference to me in the Dad.printMe method implicitly points to the static field Dad.me, so one way or another you're changing what printMe does in Son...

2

You cannot override variables in a class. You can override only methods. You should keep the variables private otherwise you can get a lot of problems.

  • You can't override any statics. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 26 '09 at 11:40
  • (or at least it doesn't make sense, IFSWIM.) – Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 26 '09 at 11:40
  • Correct, you can't override statics. You can SHADOW them or some people called me MASKING. – Dale Nov 11 '16 at 17:32
2

It indeed prints 'dad', since the field is not overridden but hidden. There are three approaches to make it print 'son':

Approach 1: override printMe

class Dad
{
    protected static String me = "dad";

    public void printMe()
    {
        System.out.println(me);
    }
}

class Son extends Dad
{
    protected static String me = "son";

    @override
    public void printMe()
    {
        System.out.println(me);
    }
}

public void doIt()
{
    new Son().printMe();
}

Approach 2: don't hide the field and initialize it in the constructor

class Dad
{
    protected static String me = "dad";

    public void printMe()
    {
        System.out.println(me);
    }
}

class Son extends Dad
{
    public Son()
    {
        me = "son";
    }
}

public void doIt()
{
    new Son().printMe();
}

Approach 3: use the static value to initialize a field in the constructor

class Dad
{
    private static String meInit = "Dad";

    protected String me;

    public Dad() 
    {
       me = meInit;
    }

    public void printMe()
    {
        System.out.println(me);
    }
}

class Son extends Dad
{
    private static String meInit = "son";

    public Son()
    {
        me = meInit;
    }

}

public void doIt()
{
    new Son().printMe();
}
2

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/hidevariables.html

It's called Hiding Fields

From the link above

Within a class, a field that has the same name as a field in the superclass hides the superclass's field, even if their types are different. Within the subclass, the field in the superclass cannot be referenced by its simple name. Instead, the field must be accessed through super, which is covered in the next section. Generally speaking, we don't recommend hiding fields as it makes code difficult to read.

  • 1
    A link to a potential solution is always welcome, but please add context around the link so your fellow users will have some idea what it is and why it’s there. Always quote the most relevant part of an important link, in case the target site is unreachable or goes permanently offline. Take into account that being barely more than a link to an external site is a possible reason as to Why and how are some answers deleted?. – FelixSFD Jan 6 '17 at 12:59
0

Of course using private attributes, and getters and setters would be the recommended thing to do, but I tested the following, and it works... See the comment in the code

class Dad
{
    protected static String me = "dad";

    public void printMe()
    {
        System.out.println(me);
    }
}

class Son extends Dad
{
    protected static String me = "son";

    /* 
    Adding Method printMe() to this class, outputs son 
    even though Attribute me from class Dad can apparently not be overridden
    */

    public void printMe()
    {
        System.out.println(me);
    }
}

class Tester
{
    public static void main(String[] arg)
    {
        new Son().printMe();
    }
}

Sooo ... did I just redefine the rules of inheritance or did I put Oracle into a tricky situation ? To me, protected static String me is clearly overridden, as you can see when you execute this program. Also, it does not make any sense to me why attributes should not be overridable.

  • 1
    In this case you are "hiding" the variable from the super class. This is distinct from overriding and has nothing to do with inheritance. Other classes will see one variable or the other depending on whether they referenced the base-class or the sub-class and the one they see is fixed at compile time. If you changed the name "me" in the sub class to something else you would get the same effect. Most IDEs and code validation tools (findbugs etc) will warn you when you hide variables like this since it is usually not what you want to do. – AutomatedMike Oct 11 '12 at 7:11
  • You are looking at programming from the perspective of coding alone. Which is fine, code however you want in that case. If you look at coding from the view of a team member, then the rules become clear, such as to why fields aren't overridable and so on. I could give you a speech as to why, but if you aren't seeing it from that perspective of a team member, you will just see my points as invalid and throw invalid arguments back at me. – nckbrz Apr 14 '14 at 2:13
0

Why would you want to override variables when you could easily reassign them in the subClasses.

I follow this pattern to work around the language design. Assume a case where you have a weighty service class in your framework which needs be used in different flavours in multiple derived applications.In that case , the best way to configure the super class logic is by reassigning its 'defining' variables.

public interface ExtensibleService{
void init();
}

public class WeightyLogicService implements ExtensibleService{
    private String directoryPath="c:\hello";

    public void doLogic(){
         //never forget to call init() before invocation or build safeguards
         init();
       //some logic goes here
   }

   public void init(){}    

}

public class WeightyLogicService_myAdaptation extends WeightyLogicService {
   @Override
   public void init(){
    directoryPath="c:\my_hello";
   }

}
0

No. Class variables(Also applicable to instance variables) don't exhibit overriding feature in Java as class variables are invoked on the basis of the type of calling object. Added one more class(Human) in the hierarchy to make it more clear. So now we have

Son extends Dad extends Human

In the below code, we try to iterate over an array of Human, Dad and Son objects, but it prints Human Class’s values in all cases as the type of calling object was Human.

    class Human
{
    static String me = "human";

    public void printMe()
    {
        System.out.println(me);
    }
}
class Dad extends Human
{
    static String me = "dad";

}

class Son extends Dad
{
    static String me = "son";
}


public class ClassVariables {
    public static void main(String[] abc)   {
        Human[] humans = new Human[3];
        humans[0] = new Human();
        humans[1] = new Dad();
        humans[2] = new Son();
        for(Human human: humans)   {
            System.out.println(human.me);        // prints human for all objects
        }
    }
}

Will print

  • human
  • human
  • human

So no overriding of Class variables.

If we want to access the class variable of actual object from a reference variable of its parent class, we need to explicitly tell this to compiler by casting parent reference (Human object) to its type.

    System.out.println(((Dad)humans[1]).me);        // prints dad

    System.out.println(((Son)humans[2]).me);        // prints son

Will print

  • dad
  • son

On how part of this question:- As already suggested override the printMe() method in Son class, then on calling

Son().printMe();

Dad's Class variable "me" will be hidden because the nearest declaration(from Son class printme() method) of the "me"(in Son class) will get the precedence.

0

Variables don't take part in overrinding. Only methods do. A method call is resolved at runtime, that is, the decision to call a method is taken at runtime, but the variables are decided at compile time only. Hence that variable is called whose reference is used for calling and not of the runtime object.

Take a look at following snippet:

package com.demo;

class Bike {
  int max_speed = 90;
  public void disp_speed() {
    System.out.println("Inside bike");
 }
}

public class Honda_bikes extends Bike {
  int max_speed = 150;
  public void disp_speed() {
    System.out.println("Inside Honda");
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Honda_bikes obj1 = new Honda_bikes();
    Bike obj2 = new Honda_bikes();
    Bike obj3 = new Bike();

    obj1.disp_speed();
    obj2.disp_speed();
    obj3.disp_speed();

    System.out.println("Max_Speed = " + obj1.max_speed);
    System.out.println("Max_Speed = " + obj2.max_speed);
    System.out.println("Max_Speed = " + obj3.max_speed);
  }

}

When you run the code, console will show:

Inside Honda
Inside Honda
Inside bike

Max_Speed = 150
Max_Speed = 90
Max_Speed = 90

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.