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I've a strange problem. I started approx. 160 processes. Now, if the mouse pointer is on the Desktop, some actions which used to take 100ms, now take 10 seconds although the total load of the system is 13-16%. Even thrid party programs like processhacker slowing down and doesn't refresh their gui. If I move the mouse pointer over some window no matter which one (could be notepad) even the taskbar can help all goes back to normal. Processhacker is refreshing his lists and the responsivness is back to 100ms. Since Microsoft-Support won't help use - since or processes are programmed in Borland-Delphi we have no idea how to find out what's going on here. A colleague tries to reproduce the effect with this little test program:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Forms,
  ExtCtrls,
  Classes,
  Controls,
  StdCtrls;

const
  DEFAULT_INTERVAL = 31;
  MOD_VALUE = 5;
  MOD_INTERVAL = DEFAULT_INTERVAL * MOD_VALUE;
  DEVIATION_BLACK = 2;
  DEVIATION_RED = 10;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    Label1: TLabel;
    procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
    procedure FormDestroy(Sender: TObject);
  private
    Timer: TTimer;
    lastTime: TDateTime;
    procedure OnTimer(Sender: TObject);
    procedure SetLabel(lbl: TLabel);
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;
  GCounterT: Integer;

implementation

uses
  Windows,
  Graphics,
  SysUtils,
  DateUtils;

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Self.DoubleBuffered := True;

  Timer := TTimer.Create(nil);
  Timer.Interval := DEFAULT_INTERVAL;
  Timer.OnTimer := OnTimer;

  GCounterT := 0;
  lastTime := Now();
end;

procedure TForm1.FormDestroy(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Timer.Free;
end;

procedure TForm1.OnTimer(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Inc(GCounterT);
  if (GCounterT mod MOD_VALUE) = 0 then begin
    SetLabel(Label1);
    GCounterT := 0;
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.SetLabel(lbl: TLabel);
var
  newValue: string;
  nowTime: TDateTime;
  msDiff: Integer;
  newColor: TColor;
begin
  if IsIconic(Application.Handle) then Exit;

  nowTime := Now();
  msDiff := MilliSecondsBetween(nowTime, lastTime);
  lastTime := nowTime;

  newValue := Format('TTimer:      %s  dev: %d',[FormatDateTime('ss.zzz', nowTime), msDiff - MOD_INTERVAL]);
  if   (msDiff <= (MOD_INTERVAL + DEVIATION_BLACK))
   and (msDiff >= (MOD_INTERVAL - DEVIATION_BLACK)) then
    newColor := clGreen
  else if (msDiff <= (MOD_INTERVAL + DEVIATION_RED))
   and    (msDiff >= (MOD_INTERVAL - DEVIATION_RED)) then
    newColor := clBlack
  else
    newColor := clRed;
  try
    lbl.Font.Color := newColor;
    lbl.Caption := newValue;
  except
  end;
end;

end.

The effect in not as strong as with the original processes, but it's reproduceable. If one starts 180 of this you can see the same effect only the slowdown is not that severe.

Update Aug 04: I've added a screenshot from a WPA-Analyze-Session. Here one can see the sequence. Starting with mouse on a Window, then Desktop, Window, Desktop and ending with mouse on Window. You can see, that the Thread: CSwitch count is going nearly half if the mouse is on the Desktop. What you also could see is that the system load is between 10-17% the whole time. enter image description here

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  • 1
    You've put six tonnes of load on a single donkey and you're wondering why it can't walk. 31ms timer interval with 160 process = 193 microseconds of CPU time per WM_TIMER message in the queue. If what you're doing in that handler takes more than 193 microseconds, you now have no CPU time left and WM_TIMER messages will become late or dropped entirely. This is not a salvageable design. You have to start again and architect the program differently.
    – J...
    Jul 26 at 15:39
  • Note the documentation for WM_TIMER : The WM_TIMER message is a low-priority message. The GetMessage and PeekMessage functions post this message only when no other higher-priority messages are in the thread's message queue. That the CPU is struggling to draw (WM_PAINT is higher priority than WM_TIMER) is a dead giveaway that you have no more CPU resources left. 160 processes will saturate all cores on any desktop system... checkmate. You need to rewrite this in a much more efficient way.
    – J...
    Jul 26 at 15:47
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    Which kind of processor(s) do you have in your system? I guess you have 4 sockets equipped with 4 Intel Xeon Platinum 8368 Processor (For a total of 152 cores or 304 threads). If not, you'd better buy such a system :-)
    – fpiette
    Jul 26 at 15:53
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    The problem here isn't only the message processing and GUI rendering. The problem here is also the shear fact that OS needs to keep switching between those 180 threads in order to allow all application to do their work. Switching between active threads does bring some additional overhead. That is why when you are making a multi-threaded application you don't just go and create an arbitrary number of threads but only as many threads as you have cores available. Jul 26 at 19:32
  • 2
    @GreenEyedAndy I'm sure an enlightening treatise on the guts of the Windows ecosystem would be interesting as applied to this particular problem, but it doesn't change the solution - hundreds of processes with fast-ticking timers is not a sane design strategy, so you'll need to completely re-architect. Consider first, to what degree those hundreds of processes actually even need a UI - surely there are no users watching those labels change colour, so stuff the work into a thread and optionally show a GUI for a specific instance if and only if the user wants to see it.
    – J...
    Jul 26 at 22:07
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After we managed to add debug-symbols to some of our processes, we found the issue in the Delphi-VCL/Forms.pas. In a new trace, with debug-symbols, we saw that the Application.DoMouseIdle method spends a lot of time finding VCLWindows, get Parents of these and so on. The source of the slowdown is the "FindDragTarget" method. Our processes need no drag'n'drop functionality and they need no hint showing somewhere. So we cut this function call out of the code, which was not easy. Now everything is running fast undependend from the mouse position.

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