I have a mysql db with several tables, let's call them Table1, Table2, etc. I have to make several calls to each of these tables

Which is most efficient,

a) Collecting all queries for each table in one message, then executing them separately, e.g.:

INSERT INTO TABLE1 VALUES (A,B);
INSERT INTO TABLE1 VALUES (A,B);

...execute

INSERT INTO TABLE2 VALUES (A,B);
INSERT INTO TABLE2 VALUES (A,B);

...execute

b) Collecting ALL queries in one long message(not in order of table), then executing this query, e.g:

INSERT INTO TABLE1 VALUES (A,B);
INSERT INTO TABLE2 VALUES (B,C);
INSERT INTO TABLE1 VALUES (B,A);
INSERT INTO TABLE3 VALUES (D,B);

c) Something else?

Currently I am doing it like option (b), but I am wondering if there is a better way.

(I am using jdbc to access the db, in a groovy script).

Thanks!

  • I've heard of a batch mode, this is an example for java java2s.com/Code/Java/Database-SQL-JDBC/BatchupdateforMySQL.htm. However doing something similar with Postgresql didn't give me any significant improvement in performance, so I cannot tell you whether this helps or not. – Ankur Jul 28 '11 at 8:57
  • 1
    The code you're currently using might help? – tim_yates Jul 28 '11 at 8:57
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Rather than looking at which is more efficient, first consider whether the tables are large and whether you need concurrency.

If they are (millions of records) then you may want to separate them on a statement to statement basis and give some time between each statement, so you will not lock the table for too long at a time.

If your table isn't that large or concurrency is not a problem, then by all means do whichever. You should look at the slow logs of the statements and see which statement is faster.

  • No, they aren't that large, only about ~5000 of records for each table.. Thanks for the advice :) – franka Jul 28 '11 at 12:01

Third option - using prepared statements.

Without posting your code, you've made this a bit of a wild guess, but this blog post shows great performance improvements using the groovy Sql.withBatch method.

The code they show (which uses sqlite) is reproduced here for posterity:

Sql sql = Sql.newInstance("jdbc:sqlite:/home/ron/Desktop/test.db", "org.sqlite.JDBC")
sql.execute("create table dummyTable(number)")

sql.withBatch {stmt->
    100.times {
      stmt.addBatch("insert into dummyTable(number) values(${it})")
    }
    stmt.executeBatch()
}

which inserts the numbers 1 to 1000 into a table dummyTable

This will obviously need tweaking to work with your unknown code

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