10

Suppose I have a vector x with n elements. I want to use any vectorised function, say cumprod, on every alternate number of x, i.e. every 1, 3, 5 and so on and another on 2, 4, 6 and so on. I am adding a reprex and code tried. The code works, but it seems I am unnecessarily taking a long route and code can be shortened. Can it be?

x <- 5:14

cumprod((x * (seq_along(x) %% 2)) + (seq_along(x)-1) %% 2) * seq_along(x) %% 2 +
  cumprod((x * ((seq_along(x)-1) %% 2)) + seq_along(x) %% 2) * (seq_along(x)-1) %% 2
#>  [1]     5     6    35    48   315   480  3465  5760 45045 80640

Here cumprod is just an example function. I may have to use other functions in alternate sequence as well.

3
  • 1
    It would be cool if base R had a function equivalent to take-nth in Clojure. Jul 28 at 17:01
  • 1
    @BillO'Brien I'm not familiar with Clojure, but how about y <- x[seq(1,n,by=2)] ? This is basically thelatemail's answer Jul 29 at 12:50
  • 2
    wasn't on yesterday. All the answers below are amazing. Another way is to do Reduce(function(x, y) c(x, y*tail(x, 2)[1]), x, init = 1)[-1] Which means you can always change the 2 to any number. ie 3, 4, etc
    – Onyambu
    Jul 29 at 21:16
8

We could do this in a concise way with rowCumprods after creating a matrix (assuming the vector is of even length)

library(matrixStats)
c(rowCumprods(matrix(x, nrow = 2)))

-output

[1]     5     6    35    48   315   480  3465  5760 45045 80640

if it can be odd length, then just append an NA at the end

 c(rowCumprods(matrix(c(x,  list(NULL, NA)[[1 +
         (length(x) %%2 != 0)]]), nrow = 2)))

-output

 [1]     5     6    35    48   315   480  3465  5760 45045 80640

Or we can do this in a generalized way with ave (works both with even/odd lengths)

ave(x, seq_along(x) %% 2, FUN = cumprod)
 [1]     5     6    35    48   315   480  3465  5760 45045 80640
1
  • 2
    dear Arun, last one is fantastic. I think we can use any function in there. Accepting it. :)
    – AnilGoyal
    Jul 29 at 15:33
7

Select odd (c(TRUE, FALSE)) or even (c(FALSE, TRUE)) indices. Weave the two resulting vectors (c(rbind)

c(rbind(cumprod(x[c(TRUE, FALSE)]), cumprod(x[c(FALSE, TRUE)])))
# [1]     5     6    35    48   315   480  3465  5760 45045 80640

To handle also odd vector length, you need to truncate the result to length of the vector.

x = 1:5

c(rbind(cumprod(x[c(TRUE, FALSE)]), cumprod(x[c(FALSE, TRUE)])))[1:length(x)]
# [1]  1  2  3  8 15

There will be a warning when the shorter result vector, corresponding to the even indices (which has one element less), is recycled in the rbind step.

3
  • Actually I want something like this only. But will it work when x has odd number of elements?
    – AnilGoyal
    Jul 28 at 17:17
  • Yeah. I already tried that method.
    – AnilGoyal
    Jul 28 at 17:25
  • 1
    Thanks for the constructive comment. Jul 28 at 18:07
6

One option for both even and odd number of elements could be:

c(t(apply(matrix(x, 2, sum(seq_along(x) %% 2)), 1, cumprod)))[1:length(x)]

With x <- 1:5:

[1]  1  2  3  8 15

With x <- 1:6:

[1]  1  2  3  8 15 48

Or a less effective option, however, without any warnings:

y <- Reduce(`c`, sapply(split(setNames(x, seq_along(x)), !seq_along(x) %% 2), cumprod))
y[order(as.numeric(names(y)))]
2
  • The reduce one, you could just have Reduce(function(x, y) c(x, y*tail(x, 2)[1]), x, init = 1)[-1]
    – Onyambu
    Jul 29 at 21:22
  • @Onyambu this is a beautiful option! I think you should post it as a separate answer :)
    – tmfmnk
    Jul 29 at 21:45
5

Another option - take a sequence and then fill the results back in:

x <- 5:14

s <- seq(1, length(x), 2)
o <- x
o[s]  <- cumprod(x[s])
o[-s] <- cumprod(x[-s])
o 
# [1]     5     6    35    48   315   480  3465  5760 45045 80640

Or if you want to code-golf it:

s <- seq(1, length(x), 2)
replace(replace(x, s, cumprod(x[s])), -s, cumprod(x[-s]))
# [1]     5     6    35    48   315   480  3465  5760 45045 80640
2
  • Better late than never. Fantastic approach. I like this one because, I can apply any vectorised function here without taking care the identity here. Thanks. Needless to say +1 already
    – AnilGoyal
    Jul 29 at 5:10
  • Thanks once again for your fantastic answer. Sorry that I cannot two answers, in that case I would have chosen yours. :)
    – AnilGoyal
    Jul 29 at 15:34
3

Updated Solution

This may sound a bit verbose but it will work with odd and even number of lengths and also @Henrik's custom vector:

x <- 5:14
lapply(split(x, !(seq_len(length(x)) %% 2)), cumprod) |>
  setNames(c("a", "b")) |>
  list2env(globalenv())

c(a, b)[order(c(seq_along(a)*2 - 1, seq_along(b)*2))]

[1]     5     6    35    48   315   480  3465  5760 45045 80640

With an odd vector:

x <- 5:13
[1]     5     6    35    48   315   480  3465  5760 45045

Or with x = c(1, 0, 3, 4)

[1] 1 0 3 0

And in the end with x = c(2, 4, 2, 4):

[1]  2  4  4 16
7
  • 1
    Doesn't the x%%2 split in odd and even values, whereas I think OP wants to split in odd and even indices, like seq_along(x) %% 2? Try on e.g. x = c(2, 4, 2, 4). Cheers
    – Henrik
    Jul 28 at 19:36
  • 1
    So maybe l = lapply(split(x, seq_along(x)%%2), cumprod); c(l[[2]], l[[1]])[order(c(seq_along(l[[2]]), seq_along(l[[1]])))]
    – Henrik
    Jul 28 at 19:43
  • Please check my modified, ultimate version :D Jul 28 at 19:47
  • 1
    Excellent! (I hope you don't mind my comments. I just try to learn from other answers, and when playing around I sometimes stumble on things that have potential for tweeking, often a result of my own struggles with my own attempts). Cheers
    – Henrik
    Jul 28 at 19:49
  • 1
    No not at all. In fact I really appreciate you took your time to critic my solution, cause these discussions while we grapple with the issue by tweaking and changing is a great way to learn. I am still the least experienced contributor here and it's a great honor for me to be learning from you guys. Thank you again. Jul 28 at 19:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.