17

When I used g++ 5.4.0, the sample code below worked as expected, but after I updated the g++ to 10.2.0, the result was changed. I also tested the sample code on clang++ 11.0.1, and the result was the same as g++ 5.4.0.

I have searched some relevant questions but did not get a valid answer. As I know, the overload function should be matched before the template, Why does g++ 10.2.0 get a different result, and how can I resolve this?

Because the original source codes are very complex, so it is not easy to refactor them with other c++ features, could this problem be fixed with a smaller change?

The target of the sample code is using the overload function Base::operator const std::string&() to execute some special action and using the template function to execute common action.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class Base 
{
public:
    template <class T>
    operator const T&() const;
    virtual operator const std::string&() const;
};

template <class T>
Base::operator const T&() const
{
    std::cout << "use template method" << std::endl;
    static T tmp{};
    return tmp;
}

Base::operator const std::string&() const
{
    std::cout << "use overload method" << std::endl;
    const static std::string tmp;
    return tmp;
}

template <class T>
class Derive : public Base
{
public:
    operator const T&() const
    {
        const T& res = Base::operator const T&();
        return res;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Derive<std::string> a;
    const std::string& b = a;
    return 1;
}

The g++ 5.4.0 result:

g++ -std=c++11  main.cpp -o test && ./test
use overload method

The g++ 10.2.0 result:

g++ -std=c++11 main.cpp -o test && ./test          
use template method

The clang++ 11.0.1 result:

clang++ -std=c++11  main.cpp -o test && ./test
use overload method
0
16

This is definitely a GCC bug:

template <class T>
class Derive : public Base {
 public:
  operator const T&() const override {
    using Y = std::string;
    static_assert(std::is_same<T, Y>::value, "");
    
    std::string static res;

    res = Base::operator const Y&();
    res = Base::operator const T&();
    return res;
  }
};

Here, 2 different versions of the operator are called even though Y and T are identical. Godbolt

Clang has the correct behavior, you can use that as a workaround. Do report the bug so it can be fixed in following releases of GCC.

4
  • 2
    It's been there for quite a while, I did a quick bisection on Godbolt and it seems the first one to introduce it was 8.1
    – alagner
    Jul 30 at 6:21
  • @AyxanHaqverdili thank you, can I add a condition like enable_if on the template function to avoid the compiler use the template firstly?
    – sizzle
    Jul 30 at 7:13
  • @sizzle Doesn't look like it works gcc.godbolt.org/z/8n6xEfvqx Jul 30 at 7:22
  • @sizzle I did check and it seems the compiler ignores the non-templated overload completely in such case.
    – alagner
    Jul 30 at 7:23
0

the possible workaround:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class Base 
{
public:
    virtual operator const std::string&() const
    {
    std::cout << "use overload method" << std::endl;
    const static std::string tmp;
    return tmp;
    }

    template<typename T>
    operator const T&() const
    {
    std::cout << "use template method" << std::endl;
    static T tmp{};
    return tmp;
    }
};


template <class T>
class Derive : public Base
{
public:
    template<typename U = T>   // modification: let operator be template
    operator const T&() const
    {
        const T& res = Base::operator const U&();   // modification: call type operator on template type parameter
        return res;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Derive<std::string> a;
    const std::string& b = a;
    return 1;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.