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I have abstract Class AbstractEmployee and two concrete sub-classes FixedSalaryEmployee and PerHourSalaryEmployee which inherit from AbstractEmployee and override its abstract getSalary method with correct implementation for given employye type.

First implementation FixedSalaryEmployee - Employee with fixed salary. Where average monthly salary is equal to employee the value of salary in JSON data.

Second implementation PerHourSalaryEmployee- Employee with per-hour salary. Where hour rate is equal to the value of salary in JSON data, working day has 8 hours and month has 20.88 working days in average.

And create Collection class which is able to work with employees of different types.

The main question is how to сreate EmployeeCollection class which represents collection of Employees:

  • Constructor should accept data from JSON file and create instances of corresponding classes based on type field.
    • id should be generated in a format id<number> e.g. (id0, id1 etc. for each item in collection)
  • Items in collection should be sorted by the next rules:
    • Sort all employees in descending order of average monthly salary.
    • If average monthly salary of employees is equal use employee name instead.

Need use ES5!

//AbstractEmployee.js
var AbstractEmployee = function(id, name, salary) {
    if (this.constructor === AbstractEmployee) {
      throw new Error("Can't instantiate abstract class!");
    }

    this.id = id;
    this.name = name;
    this.salary = salary; 

    if(typeof(object.id) !== 'string' || typeof(object.name) !== 'string' || typeof(object.salary) !== 'number'){
        throw new Error("Wrong param passed!");
    }
};

AbstractEmployee.prototype.getSalary = function() {
    throw new Error('Method getSalary() must be implemented');
}

//PerHourSalaryEmployee.js
var AbstractEmployee = require('./AbstractEmployee.js')

var PerHourSalaryEmployee = function(id, name, salary) { 
    AbstractEmployee.apply(this, arguments)
    this.id = 'id' + id;
    this.name = name;
    this.salary = salary * 20.88 * 8; 
 };
 PerHourSalaryEmployee.prototype.getSalary = function() {
    return this.salary;
}

module.exports = PerHourSalaryEmployee

//FixedSalaryEmployee.js
var AbstractEmployee = require('./AbstractEmployee.js')

var FixedSalaryEmployee = function(id, name, salary) {
    AbstractEmployee.apply(this, arguments);
    this.id = 'id' + id;
    this.name = name;
    this.salary = salary; 
};

FixedSalaryEmployee.prototype.getSalary = function() {
    return this.salary;
}

module.exports = FixedSalaryEmployee

employees-collection.json

[{
  "type": "per-hour",
  "salary": 10,
  "name": "Anna"
},
{
  "type": "per-hour",
  "salary": 8,
  "name": "Bob"
},
{
  "type": "fixed",
  "salary": 8000,
  "name": "Dany"
},
{
  "type": "fixed",
  "salary": 8000,
  "name": "Clara"
},
{
  "type": "fixed",
  "salary": 1000,
  "name": "Egor"
}]
4
  • The collection class should have an instance variable containing an array of AbstractEmployee. When it processes the JSON, it calls either PerHourSalaryEmployee() or FixedSalaryEmployee(), and pushes the employee onto the array.
    – Barmar
    Jul 30 at 20:46
  • 1
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! How to ask homework question and Open letter to students with homework problems
    – Barmar
    Jul 30 at 20:46
  • 1/2 ... 1st) AbstractEmployee is not used as a class (constructor). It is merely used as function based mixin. Thus the implementation of AbstractEmployee.prototype.getSalary is just a waste of characters. ... 2nd) Both constructor functions, PerHourSalaryEmployee and FixedSalaryEmployee do each independently create instances with a set of equally named properties (id, name, salary ) which renders the applying of the AbstractEmployee in both constructor functions almost entirely useless. Aug 2 at 16:00
  • 2/2 ... conclusion ... AbstractEmployee is almost entirely dead code. How it gets used by the example does not effect anything differently from what already gets achieved by each of the other constructor functions alone, except for the type checking of the arguments which itself is wrongly implemented (there is no object scope). possible solution ... rename AbstractEmployee to e.g. typeCheckEmployeeArguments strip all the unnecessary code and implement the type checking correctly which makes it clearly a simple helper function. Aug 2 at 16:11
0

As was already commented, a half baked AbstractEmployee function used merely as a function based mixin does not make real sense.

A pure old school (it was asked for / limited to ES5-syntax) inheritance approach is much better suitable.

And one actually does not even need a BaseEmployee constructor since the features of a FixedSalaryEmployee type are totally equal to the ones of a BaseEmployee type, and the PerHourSalaryEmployee type differs only in the internal/initial computation of its salary property(, but one never knows what the future still might bring) ...

function orderBySalaryDescendingAndNameAscending(a, b) {
  return (b.salary - a.salary) || a.name.localeCompare(b.name);
}

// employee factory.
function createTypeDependedEmployeeVariant(rawData, idx) {
  const { type, name, salary } = rawData;

  const employee = (type === 'per-hour')
    ? new PerHourSalaryEmployee(String(idx), name, salary)
    : new FixedSalaryEmployee(String(idx), name, salary)

  // employee.type = type;
  return employee;
}

// employee list factory.
function createOrderedListOfVariousEmployeeInstances(arr) {
  return arr
    .map(createTypeDependedEmployeeVariant)
    .sort(orderBySalaryDescendingAndNameAscending);
}

const jsonDataList = [{
  "type": "per-hour",
  "salary": 10,
  "name": "Anna"
}, {
  "type": "per-hour",
  "salary": 8,
  "name": "Bob"
}, {
  "type": "fixed",
  "salary": 8000,
  "name": "Dany"
}, {
  "type": "fixed",
  "salary": 8000,
  "name": "Clara"
}, {
  "type": "fixed",
  "salary": 1000,
  "name": "Egor"
}];

console.log(
  createOrderedListOfVariousEmployeeInstances(jsonDataList)
    .map(({ id, name, salary }) => ({ id, name, salary }))
);
console.log(
  createOrderedListOfVariousEmployeeInstances(jsonDataList)
    .map(item => item.getSalary())
);
console.log(
  createOrderedListOfVariousEmployeeInstances(jsonDataList)
);
.as-console-wrapper { min-height: 100%!important; top: 0; }
<script>
  function BaseEmployee(id, name, salary) {
    if (
      (typeof id !== 'string') ||
      (typeof name !== 'string') ||
      (typeof salary !== 'number') ||
      !Number.isFinite(salary)
    ) {
      throw new TypeError('Wrong parameter(s) passed!');
    }
    this.id = 'id' + id;
    this.name = name;
    this.salary = salary;
  }
  BaseEmployee.prototype.getSalary = function() {
    return this.salary;
  }
</script>

<script>
  function PerHourSalaryEmployee (id, name, salary) {
    // super call.
    BaseEmployee.apply(this, arguments);

    this.salary = (salary * 20.88 * 8);
  };
  // extend superclass.
  PerHourSalaryEmployee.prototype = Object.create(BaseEmployee.prototype);

  // prevent super constructor from being the sub-classed constructor.
  PerHourSalaryEmployee.prototype.constructor = PerHourSalaryEmployee;
</script>

<script>
  function FixedSalaryEmployee(id, name, salary) {
    // super call.
    BaseEmployee.apply(this, arguments);
  };
  // extend superclass.
  FixedSalaryEmployee.prototype = Object.create(BaseEmployee.prototype);

  // prevent super constructor from being the sub-classed constructor.
  FixedSalaryEmployee.prototype.constructor = FixedSalaryEmployee;
</script>

The most optimized Employee-class code-base would/could look like the below provided code. There is no difference in its usage with the above provided factories in comparison to the above code base which features the additional BaseEmployee ...

function checkEmployeeArguments(id, name, salary) {
  if (
    (typeof id !== 'string') ||
    (typeof name !== 'string') ||
    (typeof salary !== 'number') ||
    !Number.isFinite(salary)
  ) {
    throw new TypeError('Wrong parameter(s) passed!');
  }
}

function FixedSalaryEmployee(id, name, salary) {
  checkEmployeeArguments(id, name, salary);

  this.id = 'id' + id;
  this.name = name;
  this.salary = salary;
}
FixedSalaryEmployee.prototype.getSalary = function() {
  return this.salary;
}
function PerHourSalaryEmployee (id, name, salary) {
  // super call.
  FixedSalaryEmployee.apply(this, arguments);

  this.salary = (salary * 20.88 * 8);
};
// extend superclass.
PerHourSalaryEmployee.prototype = Object.create(FixedSalaryEmployee.prototype);

// prevent super constructor from being the sub-classed prototype constructor.
PerHourSalaryEmployee.prototype.constructor = PerHourSalaryEmployee;

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