11

I use the following command:

table(factor("list",levels=1:"n")

with "list": (example) a = c(1,3,4,4,3) and levels = 1:5, to also take the 2 and 5 into consideration. For really big datasets, my code seems to be very ineffective.

Does anyone know a hidden library or a code snippet to make it faster?

5
  • Your dataset is a data.frame?
    – Martin Gal
    Jul 31 at 17:56
  • Originally, it is a list of vectors. Actually, I unlist() them to a huge vector. But if there is any chance with a data.frame, the data can be in a data frame.
    – elmoBlue
    Jul 31 at 18:03
  • Please provide a sample dataset and the expected output
    – GuedesBF
    Jul 31 at 18:07
  • input: a = c(1,3,4,4,3) output: result = c(1, 0, 2, 2, 0) [1:1, 2:0, 3:2, 4:2, 5:0]
    – elmoBlue
    Jul 31 at 18:12
  • 3
    You should do it by editing your question, not in the comments section, @elmoBlue
    – GuedesBF
    Jul 31 at 18:51
13

We could use fnobs from collapse which would be efficient

library(collapse)
fnobs(df, g = df$X1)

In base R, tabulate is more efficient compared to table

 tabulate(df$X1)
 [1]  9  6 15 13 11  9  7  9 11 10
2
  • 1
    fnobs seems to be very fast! Thank you a lot
    – elmoBlue
    Jul 31 at 19:40
  • 1
    base::tabulate is a clear winner here.
    – polkas
    Aug 1 at 9:26
10

We could also use janitor::tabyl:

library(janitor)

df %>%
  tabyl(X1) %>%
  adorn_totals()

    X1   n percent
     1   9    0.09
     2   6    0.06
     3  15    0.15
     4  13    0.13
     5  11    0.11
     6   9    0.09
     7   7    0.07
     8   9    0.09
     9  11    0.11
    10  10    0.10
 Total 100    1.00
8

It's not exactly what you are looking for, but perhaps you can use this:

library(dplyr)
set.seed(8192)

df <- data.frame(X1 = sample(1:10, 100, replace = TRUE))

df %>% 
  count(X1)

returns

   X1  n
1   1  9
2   2  6
3   3 15
4   4 13
5   5 11
6   6  9
7   7  7
8   8  9
9   9 11
10 10 10

If you need to count more numbers (including missing ones), you could use

library(tidyr)
library(dplyr)

df2 <- data.frame(X1 = 1:12)

df %>% 
  count(X1) %>% 
  right_join(df2, by="X1") %>% 
  mutate(n = replace_na(n, 0L))

to get

   X1  n
1   1  9
2   2  6
3   3 15
4   4 13
5   5 11
6   6  9
7   7  7
8   8  9
9   9 11
10 10 10
11 11  0
12 12  0
1
  • 1
    I can really use it :) Thank you a lot. This showed me I should use dplyr more often.
    – elmoBlue
    Jul 31 at 19:36
7

TL;DR the winner is base::tabulate.

Summing up, the base objective was a performance so I prepared a microbenchmark of all provided solutions. I use small and bigger vectors, two different scenerio. For collapse package on my machine I have to download the newest Rcpp package 1.0.7 (to suppress crashes). Even added by me Rcpp solution is slower than base::tabulate.

suppressMessages(library(janitor))
suppressMessages(library(collapse))
suppressMessages(library(dplyr))
suppressMessages(library(cpp11))

# source https://stackoverflow.com/questions/31001392/rcpp-version-of-tabulate-is-slower-where-is-this-from-how-to-understand
Rcpp::cppFunction('IntegerVector tabulate_rcpp(const IntegerVector& x, const unsigned max) {
    IntegerVector counts(max);
    for (auto& now : x) {
        if (now > 0 && now <= max)
            counts[now - 1]++;
    }
    return counts;
}')

set.seed(1234)

a = c(1,3,4,4,3)
levels = 1:5
df <- data.frame(X1 = a)


microbenchmark::microbenchmark(tabulate_rcpp = {tabulate_rcpp(df$X1, max(df$X1))},
                               base_table = {base::table(factor(df$X1, 1:max(df$X1)))},
                               stats_aggregate = {stats::aggregate(. ~ X1, cbind(df, n = 1), sum)},
                               graphics_hist = {hist(df$X1, plot = FALSE, right = FALSE)[c("breaks", "counts")]},
                               janitor_tably = {adorn_totals(tabyl(df, X1))},
                               collapse_fnobs = {fnobs(df, df$X1)},
                               base_tabulate = {tabulate(df$X1)},
                               dplyr_count = {count(df, X1)})
#> Unit: microseconds
#>             expr      min        lq       mean    median        uq       max
#>    tabulate_rcpp    2.959    5.9800   17.42326    7.9465    9.5435   883.561
#>       base_table   48.524   59.5490   72.42985   66.3135   78.9320   153.216
#>  stats_aggregate  829.324  891.7340 1069.86510  937.4070 1140.0345  2883.025
#>    graphics_hist  148.561  170.5305  221.05290  188.9570  228.3160   958.619
#>    janitor_tably 6005.490 6439.6870 8137.82606 7497.1985 8283.3670 53352.680
#>   collapse_fnobs   14.591   21.9790   32.63891   27.2530   32.6465   417.987
#>    base_tabulate    1.879    4.3310    5.68916    5.5990    6.6210    16.789
#>      dplyr_count 1832.648 1969.8005 2546.17131 2350.0450 2560.3585  7210.992
#>  neval
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100


df <- data.frame(X1 = sample(1:5, 1000, replace = TRUE))

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(tabulate_rcpp = {tabulate_rcpp(df$X1, max(df$X1))},
                               base_table = {base::table(factor(df$X1, 1:max(df$X1)))},
                               stats_aggregate = {stats::aggregate(. ~ X1, cbind(df, n = 1), sum)},
                               graphics_hist = {hist(df$X1, plot = FALSE, right = FALSE)[c("breaks", "counts")]},
                               janitor_tably = {adorn_totals(tabyl(df, X1))},
                               collapse_fnobs = {fnobs(df, df$X1)},
                               base_tabulate = {tabulate(df$X1)},
                               dplyr_count = {count(df, X1)})
#> Unit: microseconds
#>             expr      min        lq       mean    median        uq       max
#>    tabulate_rcpp    4.847    8.8465   10.92661   10.3105   12.6785    28.407
#>       base_table   83.736  107.2040  121.77962  118.8450  129.9560   184.427
#>  stats_aggregate 1027.918 1155.9205 1338.27752 1246.6205 1434.8990  2085.821
#>    graphics_hist  209.273  237.8265  274.60654  258.9260  300.3830   523.803
#>    janitor_tably 5988.085 6497.9675 7833.34321 7593.3445 8422.6950 13759.142
#>   collapse_fnobs   26.085   38.6440   51.89459   47.8250   57.3440   333.034
#>    base_tabulate    4.501    6.7360    8.09408    8.2330    9.2170    11.463
#>      dplyr_count 1852.290 2000.5225 2374.28205 2145.9835 2516.7940  4834.544
#>  neval
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100
#>    100

Created on 2021-08-01 by the reprex package (v2.0.0)

5
  • 1
    Great benchmarking! Upvoted for your excellent work! Aug 1 at 13:34
  • That is well done. You could tweak your clean and simple Rcpp function two ways we sometimes do: "loop unrolling" (jumping multiple elements at once), and/or via OpenMP. Also, there is already an Rcpp 'sugar' function table(). Lastly, "to prevent crashing": you should generally update all packages. With Rcpp 1.0.7 we do indeed need it present if you run packages compiled against it. Lastly, one final problem you have here: you data set is unrealistically too small. I switched to a <- sample(1000, 10000, TRUE) and now your tabulate and base R table are both the fastest. Aug 1 at 14:55
  • Oh, and you are not using levels and not testing a factor so the setup is slightly different. Aug 1 at 14:58
  • One more: I gave OpenMP a shot; it does not help as the results vector is shared. Aug 1 at 15:22
  • Thanks indeed. I actually never thought janitor would be this slow! Aug 13 at 6:23
6

A base R option using aggregate (borrowing df from @Martin Gal)

> aggregate(. ~ X1, cbind(df, n = 1), sum)
   X1  n
1   1  9
2   2  6
3   3 15
4   4 13
5   5 11
6   6  9
7   7  7
8   8  9
9   9 11
10 10 10

Another option is using hist

> hist(df$X1, plot = FALSE, right = FALSE)[c("breaks", "counts")]
$breaks
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

$counts
[1]  9  6 15 13 11  9  7  9 21
5

Here is one more: summarytools

Data from Martin Gal! Many thanks:

library(summarytools)

set.seed(8192)
df <- data.frame(X1 = sample(1:10, 100, replace = TRUE))

summarytools::freq(df$X1, cumul=FALSE)

Output:

              Freq   % Valid   % Total
----------- ------ --------- ---------
          1      9      9.00      9.00
          2      6      6.00      6.00
          3     15     15.00     15.00
          4     13     13.00     13.00
          5     11     11.00     11.00
          6      9      9.00      9.00
          7      7      7.00      7.00
          8      9      9.00      9.00
          9     11     11.00     11.00
         10     10     10.00     10.00
       <NA>      0                0.00
      Total    100    100.00    100.00
1

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.