-1
#include <iostream>

struct A {
    virtual void a() {
        puts("A");
    }
};

struct B {
    virtual void b() {
        puts("B");
    }
};

struct C {
    virtual void c() {
        puts("C");
    }
};

struct D : public A, public B, public C {
    virtual void c() {
        C::c();
        puts("cd");
    }
};

int main() {
    A* obj = new D;

    obj->a();

    B* b = (B*)obj;
    b->b();
    C* c = (C*)obj;
    c->c();

    return 0;
}

I have this code where I have non virtual multiple inheritance. However, it seems to call the wrong virtual function when I call the functions in the main function. Instead of outputting:

A
B
C
cd

It outputs:

A
A
A

What puzzles me is that when I change the code to doing this:

B* b = (B*)(D*)obj;
b->b();
C* c = (C*)(D*)obj;
c->c();

It outputs what I would expect (see above). Afaik doing a double pointer cast like this wouldn't effect anything and would be optimized out by the compiler. But it seems to be changing what virtual function is being called.

Can someone explain why this would change what virtual function is being called?

Notes:

I printed the pointers at each step, they are the same.

I want to avoid using dynamic_cast (although it does work) as it's too slow for what I need it to do.

8
  • 4
    You can't cast A* to C*, they are not related classes. This is probably UB
    – Lala5th
    Jul 31 at 18:41
  • 2
    Yet another reason why C-style cast is unsafe. In what world is dynamic_cast slow? It has no larger overhead than one virtual call.
    – Quimby
    Jul 31 at 19:00
  • 1
    The (B*)(D*) cast is correct, because it converts the pointer to a pointer to D, and the compiler knows how to convert a D* to a B*. You can only do that if you know that obj is, in fact, a pointer to a subobject of an object of type D. If you always know that, the cast is okay. If you can't be sure, then dynamic_cast<B*>(obj) will get it right. Jul 31 at 20:03
  • Reopened. The duplicate about why the direct cast doesn't work is relevant, but doesn't address why the (D*)(B*) cast works. Jul 31 at 20:05
  • 1
    Even, if you don't want to use dynamic_cast, you shoudl use static_cast. The compiler would tell you that you cannot convert A * to C * so you would do it in 2 steps. Second cast, is also not necessary as one can easily write static_cast<D *>(obj)->b();.
    – Phil1970
    Jul 31 at 20:16
1

Can someone explain why this would change what virtual function is being called?

Generally, a C-style cast between pointer types won't change the value of the pointer and so will have no effect. There is, however, one exception.

A cast between a class and a parent or child class can change the value of the pointer. For example:

class A
{ int a; };

class B
{ int b; };

class C : public A, public B
...

Now, a pointer to an instance of class A will probably have the same value as a pointer to its a member and a pointer to an instance of class B will probably have the same value as a pointer to its b member. A pointer to an instance of class C can't have the same value as a pointer to both its A::a and its B::b members since they're distinct objects.

A function expecting a B* can be passed a C* since a C is a B. Similarly, a function expecting an A* can be passed a C* for the same reason. But at least one of these will require a value change to the pointer.

So casts between these types will change the values, the others are all no-ops.

Of course, all of this is UB. You are casting between unrelated types and then dereferencing them.

I want to avoid using dynamic_cast (although it does work) as it's too slow for what I need it to do.

That seems very hard to believe.

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