-1

In a Delphi 10.4.2 win-32 VCL Application in Windows 10, I use this code to collect the handles and program paths of some windows:

function GetPathFromPID(const PID: Cardinal): string;
var
  hProcess: THandle;
  Path: array[0..MAX_PATH - 1] of Char;
begin
  hProcess := Winapi.Windows.OpenProcess(Winapi.Windows.PROCESS_QUERY_INFORMATION or Winapi.Windows.PROCESS_VM_READ, False, PID);
  if hProcess <> 0 then
  try
    if Winapi.PsAPI.GetModuleFileNameEx(hProcess, 0, Path, Winapi.Windows.MAX_PATH) = 0 then
      RaiseLastOSError;
    Result := Path;
  finally
    Winapi.Windows.CloseHandle(hProcess)
  end
  else
    RaiseLastOSError;
end;

function EnumWinProc(wHandle: Winapi.Windows.HWND; aList: TStringList): Winapi.Windows.Bool; stdcall;
var
  strPath: string;
  IsAppMainWin: Boolean;
  ProcId: Cardinal;
begin
  IsAppMainWin := IsWindowVisible(wHandle)              and // Visible
    (GetWindow(wHandle, Winapi.Windows.GW_OWNER) = 0)   and // Not owned by other windows
    (GetParent(wHandle) = 0)                            and // Does not have any parent
    (GetWindowLong(wHandle, Winapi.Windows.GWL_EXSTYLE) and Winapi.Windows.WS_EX_TOOLWINDOW = 0); // Not a tool window

  if IsAppMainWin then
  begin
    GetWindowThreadProcessID(wHandle, ProcId);

    try
      strPath := GetPathFromPID(ProcId);
    except
      strPath := 'UnknownProgramPath';
    end;

    aList.AddObject(strPath, TObject(wHandle));
  end;

  Result := True;
end;

procedure ClearList(List: TStringList);
// https://stackoverflow.com/questions/9148659/how-to-free-objects-in-stringlist-in-delphi-7
var
  i: Integer;
begin
  // crash occurs here!
  for i := 0 to pred(List.Count) do
    List.Objects[i].Free;
  List.Clear;
end;

procedure TformMain.OutputAllAppWindows;
begin
  var sl := TStringList.Create;
  try
    sl.OwnsObjects := True;

    EnumWindows(@EnumWinProc, Winapi.Windows.LPARAM(sl));

    for var i := 0 to sl.Count - 1 do
    begin
      CodeSite.Send('window handle', Winapi.Windows.HWND(sl.Objects[i]));
      CodeSite.Send('program-path sl[i]', sl[i]);
    end;
    ClearList(sl); // EDIT: forgot this line!
  finally
    sl.Free; 
  end;
end;

The crash is reported by EurekaLog:

enter image description here

2.1 Date : Sat, 31 Jul 2021 22:36:53 +0200
2.2 Address : 005509D2
2.5 Type : EInvalidPointer
2.6 Message : Application made attempt to free invalid or unknown memory block: $00010AE2 OBJECT [?] 0 bytes.
2.7 ID : B5002468
2.8 Count : 1
2.11 Sent : 0

This is at the top of the EurekaLog call stack:

enter image description here

17
  • 1
    You say that the crash occurs in ClearList, but you never call ClearList, so that cannot be true. Or, perhaps you are calling ClearList before you free the TStringList (in your actual code)? If so, the bug is clear: your ClearList will free each object in the list, but will not clear the pointer to it. Hence, these pointers become dangling. And since you have set OwnsObjects = True, the string list's destructor (invoked at Free) will attempt to destroy the "objects" pointed to by these dangling pointers. Either free the objects yourself, or let the dtor do it. Jul 31 at 21:50
  • 4
    Oh, and also: the "objects" you are putting in the list aren't Delphi objects at all -- they are merely HWNDs (integers) which are definitely NOT pointing to Delphi objects. So there isn't anything to free. You mustn't free an object pointer which isn't an object pointer! Not twice, not even once! When you do aList.AddObject(strPath, TObject(wHandle)); you tell Delphi, "I know wHandle is an integer, and not an object, but please pretend that this integer is an object. I promise I will never trust you when you later on tell me it is an object". And then, a bit later, you have forgotten ... Jul 31 at 21:53
  • 1
    So, the tl;dr version: (1) You are putting integers as objects, so you mustn't treat these "objects" as objects, because they aren't. In particular, there isn't anything to free, and you mustn't free these "objects". Don't run a dtor on a "random" pointer. (2) IF you had indeed been putting real objects in the list, you would still have had a bug, because you would first have freed them yourself without niling their references, so the string list's dtor would then try to "destroy" the things pointed to by these dangling pointers. Again very bad. Jul 31 at 22:01
  • 1
    Yes, that is because you set OwnsObjects to True. This tells the Delphi RTL "hey, mr String List, when you are freed, please also free all these objects whose pointers I have been giving you". And since the Delphi RTL is rather obedient, it will try to run the destructor on each of these HWNDs (which aren't pointers to Delphi objects!). It will thus try to run the dtor on a "random" pointer. Crash. More succinctly: when you tell the string list that it owns the objects, you also tell it that the "pointers" are objects. But they aren't. They are just integers (HWNDs) that you saved in... Jul 31 at 22:05
  • 1
    Essentially, you are doing TObject(random integer).Free. Compare with this situation: If you had aList.AddObject(strPath, TFrog.Create); you would create one new TFrog object on each iteration and put an address to the TFrog heap object in the list. Then you would really need to free these frog objects, EITHER by telling the RTL to do it ( OwnsObjects = True), OR by doing it yourself. Not both. Jul 31 at 22:08
4

There are two problems here:

First, you are putting integers as objects in the string list, so you mustn't treat these "objects" as objects, because they aren't.

In particular, there isn't anything to free, and you mustn't free these "objects"; that would be equivalent to doing TObject(some random pointer).Free.

Second, if you had indeed been putting real objects in the list, you would still have had a bug, because you would first have freed them yourself without niling their references, so the string list's destructor would then try to "destroy" the things pointed to by these dangling pointers. Again, bad.

1
  • Plus the indecision of using both pred(List.Count) and sl.Count - 1.
    – AmigoJack
    Aug 1 at 8:44

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