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I know that the primary timestamp on Apple systems is the CF Absolute Time value (also called Mac Absolute Time), which is a 32-bit integer calculated by the number of seconds since 01/01/2001 00:00:00 UTC. For example, 219216022 when decoded is Thu, 13 December 2007 05:20:22 UTC.

Are there any other timestamps used on Mac/Unix systems (other than the default Unix timestamp which is a 32-bit integer calculated in seconds since 01/01/1970 00:00:00 UTC)?

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The NSDate object has timeIntervalSince1970, but that's based off the mach time. Meaning [[NSDate date] timeIntervalSince1970]-NSTimeIntervalSince1970 is equal to [NSDate timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate];

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Yes. As pointed out by @MarcusJ, the the AIFF Specification has a 32-bit binary timestamp that on the Amiga is the number of seconds since January 1, 1978, and on the Mac is the number of seconds since January 1, 1904.

  • That's not true. In the AIFF specification, they store date fields as the number of seconds since January 1, 1904. – MarcusJ Nov 15 '17 at 12:14

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