43

This question already has an answer here:

I want it to be as simple as this, but I know it isn't:

img {
  opacity: 0.4;
  filter: alpha(opacity=40);
}

img:hover {
  #thisElement {
    opacity: 0.3;
    filter: alpha(opacity=30);
  }
  opacity:1;
  filter:alpha(opacity=100);
}

So when you hover over img, it changes the opacity of #thisElement to 30% and changes the opacity of the image to 100%. Is there a way to actually do this using only css?

So this is the HTML

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" src="C:\Users\Shikamaru\Documents\Contwined Coding\LearningToCode\Learning jQuery\js\jquery-1.6.2.min.js"></script> 
<script type="text/javascript" src="briefcase.js"></script>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="taskbar.css"/>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="briefcase.css" /> 
<title>Briefcase</title> 
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" /> 
</head> 

<body> 

<div class="mask"></div>
<div class="float">
  <div id="album1">Album Title</div>
  <img class="left" src="bradBeachHeart.JPG" alt="Brad at the Lake" />

  <img class="left" src="mariaNavi.jpg" alt="Making Maria Na'vi" />

  <img class="left" src="mattWaterRun.jpg" alt="Photoshopped Matt" />
</div>

<div class="gradientTop"></div>
<div class="gradientBottom"></div>


</body> 
</html>

And this is the CSS:

body {
  font: normal small/3em helvetica, sans-serif;
  text-align: left;
  letter-spacing: 2px;
  font-size: 16px;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}

div.gradientTop {
  position: absolute;
  margin-top: 5px;
  z-index: 2;
  width: 206px;
  height: 30px;
  float: left;
  background: -webkit-linear-gradient(rgba(255, 255, 255, 2), rgba(255, 255, 255, 0))
}

div.gradientBottom {
  position: absolute;
  margin-bottom: 5px;
  z-index: 2;
  width: 206px;
  height: 120px;
  float: left;
  bottom: -210px;
  background: -webkit-linear-gradient(rgba(255, 255, 255, 0), rgba(255, 255, 255, 1))
}

div.float {
  border-right: 1px solid orange;
  position: absolute;
  z-index: 2;
  margin-left: 5px;
  margin-top: 5px;
  float: left;
  width: 200px;
}

div.mask {
  position: relative;
  z-index: 1;
  margin-top: 5px;
  float: left;
  width: 206px;
  height: 805px;
  background-color: white;
}

img.left {
  z-index: inherit;
  margin-bottom: 3px;
  float: left;
  width: 200px;
  min-height: 200px;
  /* for modern browsers */
  height: auto !important;
  /* for modern browsers */
  height: 200px;
  /* for IE5.x and IE6 */
  opacity: 0.4;
  filter: alpha(opacity=40)
}

img.left:hover + #album1 {
  opacity: .4;
}

img.left:hover {
  opacity: 1.0;
}

#album1 {
  z-index: 2;
  width: 200px;
  color: white;
  text-align: center;
  position: absolute;
  background: orange;
  top: 70px;
}

marked as duplicate by Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心996ICU六四事件, kapa css Jul 24 '14 at 16:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

62

The only way to do this with CSS is if the element to affect is either a descendent or an adjacent sibling.

In the case of a descendent:

#parent_element:hover #child_element, /* or */
#parent_element:hover > #child_element {
    opacity: 0.3;
}

Which will apply to elements such as:

<div id="parent_element">
    <div id="child_element">Content</div>
</div>

For adjacent siblings:

#first_sibling:hover + #second_sibling {
    opacity: 0.3;
}

Which works for mark-up such as:

<div id="first_sibling">Some content in the first sibling</div> <div id="second_sibling">and now in the second</div>

In both cases the latter element in the selector is the one chosen.

Given your pseudo-code example, you probably want something like:

img:hover + img {
    opacity: 0.3;
    color: red;
}

JS Fiddle demo.

  • Hey thanks! I'm going to give that a try! – Marlon Jul 29 '11 at 3:07
  • I tried it as such: img.left:hover + #album1{ opacity:.4; } img.left:hover{ opacity:1.0; } Whereas #album1 is the div element shown above the img element. It did not have the desired effect and continued to function as before. What do you recommend? – Marlon Jul 29 '11 at 16:42
  • 1
    I'd strongly recommend editing your question (hit the 'edit' link) and add the html mark-up of the relevant parts of your page to your question. That way I can see what the problems might be. It's worth noting that the + (adjacent-sibling selector) can only work to select an element (#second_sibling) that appears in the mark-up after the #first_sibling. – David Thomas Jul 29 '11 at 16:56
  • Edited. And with the relevant code (all of it, because i just created a separate document for it). Worked like a charm when I changed the order...do you have a fix for the issue of positioning? The div id="album1" needs to be vertically centered on it's sibling...and I did that manually...but this needs to be done for all of them. – Marlon Jul 29 '11 at 17:39
  • 1
    On a CSS hover event, can I change another div's styling? Also shows the general sibling selector. – fredsbend Feb 20 '14 at 22:36
5

I know you're probably looking for a pure-css way of doing what you want, but I'd suggest you use HTML+CSS+JS as the wonderful MVC structure that they are.

  • HTML is your Model, containing your data
  • CSS is your View, defining how the page should look
  • JS is your Controller, controlling how the model and view interact.

It's the controlling aspect that should be taken advantage of here. You want to control a view of an item on a user interaction. That's exactly what JS is meant for.

With very minimal JavaScript, you could toggle a class on and off of #thisElement when the img is hovered over. It certainly beats playing CSS selector games, although I'd understand if you're only willing to accept a pure-css answer.

  • No, I agree with you that js would probably be better in this case, but the only problem...I don't know js. I'm currently learning jquery, and I want a working page to demonstrate in a few days to some investors. – Marlon Jul 29 '11 at 16:44
  • 6
    An MVC structure for this is overkill and kind of off-topic :) – Dan Dascalescu Sep 9 '15 at 4:09

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