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If lunchTime is true lunch object should be logged if false err should be.

The console is logging: Error: OOOOOPs
Even if I try to log the lunch object in the then statement it just logs the error message

My plan was to just manually switch the value of lunchTime to false so that I could test the resolve/reject part of promises, but it's running the catch part of the code even tho it should be resolving.

const lunchTime = true;
    
    function orderMeSomeFood() {
        return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            if (lunchTime === true) {
                let lunch = {
                    food: "BBQ",
                    drink: "Zen WTR"
                };
    
                resolve(lunch);
            }
            else if (lunchTime === false) {
        const err = new Error('OOOOOPs')
        reject(err);
    }
            }
        })
    };
    
    orderMeSomeFood().then(() => {
        console.log(resolve);
    }).catch(() => {
        console.log(Error('OOOOOPs'));
    })
4
  • 4
    The Promise returned by orderMeSomeFood isn't rejecting. It throws an exception in console.log(resolve); because resolve isn't defined there. (Logging the parameter that is passed to .catch() would've shown you that.)
    – Ivar
    Commented Aug 6, 2021 at 18:46
  • How am I supposed to use the then catch statements to log the lunch object when true and the error message when false?
    – Wayne
    Commented Aug 6, 2021 at 18:48
  • 1
    Your edit is wrong again (now err is undefined aswell). Values from inside your Promise function are not in scope in the then/catch callbacks just because you name them the same. You need to obtain them as arguments
    – Tobias K.
    Commented Aug 6, 2021 at 19:05
  • 2
    Please don't change the code in your question after answers have been provided as that can ruin the contributions people have already made to your original question. Everything you need to know about your original code is supplied in the two answers below.
    – jfriend00
    Commented Aug 6, 2021 at 20:31

2 Answers 2

2

The problem is actually with this line of code:

console.log(resolve);

which perhaps you meant to be:

console.log("resolved");

instead. The actual resolve variable and value only exists inside the new Promise() executor function, not elsewhere. So, this throws an exception.

In case you didn't realize this, an exception inside a .then() or .catch() handler will trigger the next .catch() handler in the promise chain to get called. So, when the above exception happens inside the .then() handler, that causes code execution to jump to the next .catch() handler.


If you add this debugging:

    orderMeSomeFood().then(() => {
        console.log("got to .then() handler");
        console.log(resolve);
    }).catch((e) => {
        console.log(e);
    });

Then, you will see that it got to the .then() handler and then you will see that the actual error in the catch handler is ReferenceError: resolve is not defined and the line number will point to console.log(resolve) as the offending statement.


A lesson here is to ALWAYS log the actual exception you get in the .catch() because that will usually be a useful hint at to why your code got there.


Here's a runnable version with more logging that shows you the actual flow:

const lunchTime = true;

function orderMeSomeFood() {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        if (lunchTime === true) {
            let lunch = {
                food: "BBQ",
                drink: "Zen WTR"
            };
            console.log("about to resolve promise");
            resolve(lunch);
        } else if (lunchTime === false) {
            console.log("about to reject promise");
            reject(new Error('OOOOOPs'));
        }
    })
};

orderMeSomeFood().then(() => {
    console.log("got to .then() handler");
    console.log(resolve);
}).catch((e) => {
    console.log("got to .catch() handler");
    console.log(e.message, e.stack);
})

That provides this output:

about to resolve promise
got to .then() handler
got to .catch() handler
resolve is not defined ReferenceError: resolve is not defined
    at https://stacksnippets.net/js:32:17

So, you can see the follow:

  1. It resolved the promise
  2. It got to the .then() handler.
  3. Inside that .then() handler on the console.log(resolve) line of code, it threw an exception
  4. That sends it to the .catch() handler where it now logs the cause of the error
1

resolve only exists within the promise, so when you do console.log(resolve); it's throwing an error, which is why you're seeing the OOOOOPs message.

If you want to console.log the lunch variable, you should change your code to:

orderMeSomeFood().then(lunch => {
    console.log(lunch);
}).catch(() => {
    console.log(Error('OOOOOPs'));
})

const lunchTime = true;
    
    function orderMeSomeFood() {
        return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            if (lunchTime === true) {
                let lunch = {
                    food: "BBQ",
                    drink: "Zen WTR"
                };
    
                resolve(lunch);
            }
            else if (lunchTime === false) {
        const err = new Error('OOOOOPs')
        reject(err);
            }
        })
    };
    
    orderMeSomeFood().then(lunch => {
        console.log(lunch);
    }).catch(() => {
        console.log(new Error('OOOOOPs'));
    })

4
  • I tried this first, but it did not work that's why I tried using resolve. When I write the code exactly like yours I still get an error.
    – Wayne
    Commented Aug 6, 2021 at 21:53
  • @Wayne I've added a code snippet, just needed to change Error to new Error and remove an extra }
    – Shoejep
    Commented Aug 7, 2021 at 5:37
  • I see so the issue was I didn't give the function a parameter this was an issue in my other project too; thank you sooo much!!! So just to clarify the resolve function in the promise works similar to a return statement? Meaning it passes the lunch variable, but since I didn't give the then function a parameter it had no way of accepting the lunch variable.
    – Wayne
    Commented Aug 9, 2021 at 1:48
  • 1
    @Wayne Yes it's similar, it sounds like you understand, the .then will wait until the promise has resolved, the value you pass to resolve will become the result of the promise. Promise
    – Shoejep
    Commented Aug 9, 2021 at 6:39

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