23

I want to insert a string after every 30 lines in my large file. I'm using mini-sed, which doesn't support ~ (tilde) range operator. I'm looking for sed-only solution please.

43

This thread is another example of how to over complicate things. This should do it:

sed '0~30 s/$/string/g' < inputfile > outputfile

Every 30 lines "string" is inserted at the end of the line. If you want a new line with the word "string" just use "\n string".

  • 1
    'thread' is never the right word for a Stack Overflow page. I take your point, but you are talking about 'the other answers to this question'. :-) – Martijn Pieters Nov 1 '12 at 17:38
  • 12
    Although this was what I wanted, the asker specifically asked for solutions not using tilde. – user1207217 Feb 27 '13 at 19:45
  • This did not work: sed '0~5000 s/$/\n commit;/g' < batch.sql > batch-commit.sql sed: 1: "0~5000 s/$/\n commit;/g": invalid command code ~ – Janakiram Apr 30 '18 at 4:07
6

This inserts a line every 3 lines;

seq 1 10 | sed ': loop; n; n; a insert
n; b loop'

Producing

1
2
3
insert
4
5
6
insert
7
8
9
insert
10

adjust the number of n; commands before the a command accordingly

2
sed 'n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;n;s/$/\ 
string/' filename
  • Hi, Thanks. Is there a shorter way. To insert every 100 lines, I want to avoid specifying 'n' 100 times. – user868923 Jul 30 '11 at 8:09
  • 2
    @user868923, short answer: no, at that point you're really using the wrong tool. You could use sed to construct that string of n's and then run it, but it would be a sed command so arcane that it would really only be good for impressing other wizards. Hmm... – Beta Jul 30 '11 at 19:46
2

Begin Edit

The initial solution bellow needs as much memory in the hold space as the size of the N lines. This is a better solution that only keeps '\n' in the hold space instead of all the lines, needing much less memory:

sed -e 'p;G;s/[^\n]//g;t next;:next;s/^\n\{5\}$//;t insert;h;d;:insert;x;s/^.*$/new line/' your_large_file

The same can be done using the i command that is less known than the s command:

sed -e 'p;G;s/[^\n]//g;t next;:next;s/^\n\{5\}$//;t insert;h;d;:insert;x;i \
new line
d' your_large_file

Again, the explained version that can be run with 'sed -f script your_large_file':

# Whatever happen afterward, the current line need to be printed.
p
# Append the hold space, that contains as much \n as the number of lines read since the text has been added.
G
# Keeps only the \n in the pattern space.
s/[^\n]//g
# The 't next' bellow is needed so the 't insert' will not take into account the s command above.
t next
:next
# If we have exaclty 5 \n in the patern space, empty the hold space and insert the text, else save the pattern space for next cycle.
# In both cases, end the current cycle without printing the pattern space.
s/^\n\{3\}$//
t insert
h
d
:insert
x
i \
new line
d

End Edit

The following script will add '\nnew line' after each 5 lines. If you want to do it every 6 or 100 lines, just change the '\{5\}' by '\{6\}' or '\{100\}'.

sed -n -e 'H;g;s/[^\n]//g;t next;:next;s/^\n\{5\}$//;t insert;$ {x;s/^\n//;p};b;:insert;x;s/$/\nnew line/;s/^\n//;p' your_large_file

This deserves some explanations, so bellow is a commented script file version . It must be run with 'sed -n -f script your_large_file'.

H
g
# Now, the pattern and hold space contain what has been read so far with an extra \n at the beginning.
s/[^\n]//g
# Now, the pattern space only contains \n, the hold space is unmodified.
# The 't next' bellow is needed so the 't insert' will not take into account the s command above.
t next
:next
# If we have exactly 5 new lines in the pattern space, the hold space is printed without the \n at the beginning and with the text to added after 5 lines at its end.
s/^\n\{5\}$//
t insert
# If not 5 \n and at the last line, the hold space must be printed without the \n at its beginning.
$ {x;s/^\n//;p}
b
:insert
x
# Now the hold space is empty and ready to receive new lines as the pattern space has been emptied by the 2 s commands above.
s/$/\nnew line/
s/^\n//
p
  • Excellent! Works great, Thanks... – user868923 Aug 1 '11 at 17:20
  • 1
    Take a look at my solution which is simpler. :) – pynexj Apr 24 '17 at 4:19
2

This inserts a line after every 3 lines.

[STEP 101] # cat insert.sed
# add one more 'x' into the hold space
x
s/^/x/
t reset_t_cond
: reset_t_cond
# check if there are 3 'x' chars now
s/x\{3\}//
x
t insert
b

: insert
a\
INSERT HERE
[STEP 102] # seq 10 | sed -f insert.sed
1
2
3
INSERT HERE
4
5
6
INSERT HERE
7
8
9
INSERT HERE
10
[STEP 103] #
2

Use

sed '1~30 i everyThirtyLine' file.dat

This is tested in Cygwin.

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