2

I want to detect separate shapes as random-generated lines split the canvas. I saved line intersection points in separate arrays for x and y positions (same order), but don't know how to connect points that complete multiple pieces of shapes .

  1. Is there any way to detect nearby points to close a minimal possible shape whether it be a triangle, rectangle, or polygon (e.g., by using beginShape and endShape)?
  2. If 1) is too complicated, is there any method to select 3 or more random points from an array?

Here's a sample image that has 4 lines splitting the canvas with their intersection points marked in red. I also saved the top and bottom points (marked in black) of each random-generated line, plus the four corners of the canvas in the same arrays for x and y positions separately (px, py).

sample image that has lines dividing the canvas with their intersection points marked Multiple lines split the canvas.

shapes split by multiple lines How to get shapes split by lines in Processing?

I was able to get all the intersection points, but having a problem with connecting them into separate shapes. Here's the Processing code that I am working on:

//Run in Processing.
//Press r to refresh.
//Top and bottom points are added to px and py when refreshed (filled in black).
//Intersection points are added to px and py when detected (filled in red).
int l = 4; //set number of lines
float[] r1 = new float[l];
float[] r2 = new float[l];
float[] px = {}; //array to save x positions of all possible points
float[] py = {}; //array to save y positions of all possible points
boolean added = false;
void setup(){
  size(800, 800);
  background(255);
  
  refresh();
}
void draw(){ 
  background(255);
  stroke(0, 150, 255, 150);
  strokeWeight(1);
  for(int i=0; i < r1.length; i++){
    for(int j=0; j < r1.length; j++){
      if(i>j){
      boolean hit = lineLine(r1[i], 0, r2[i], height, r1[j], 0, r2[j], height);
      if (hit) stroke(255, 150, 0, 150);
      else stroke(0, 150, 255, 150);
      }
    line(r1[i], 0, r2[i], height);
    }
  }
  added = true;
  print(px.length);
}
//source: http://jeffreythompson.org/collision-detection/line-line.php
boolean lineLine(float x1, float y1, float x2, float y2, float x3, float y3, float x4, float y4) {
  // calculate the distance to intersection point
  float uA = ((x4-x3)*(y1-y3) - (y4-y3)*(x1-x3)) / ((y4-y3)*(x2-x1) - (x4-x3)*(y2-y1));
  float uB = ((x2-x1)*(y1-y3) - (y2-y1)*(x1-x3)) / ((y4-y3)*(x2-x1) - (x4-x3)*(y2-y1));
  // if uA and uB are between 0-1, lines are colliding
  if (uA >= 0 && uA <= 1 && uB >= 0 && uB <= 1) {
    // optionally, draw a circle where the lines meet
    float intersectionX = x1 + (uA * (x2-x1));
    float intersectionY = y1 + (uA * (y2-y1));
    fill(255,0,0);
    noStroke();
    ellipse(intersectionX,intersectionY, 20,20);
    if(added==false){
      px = append(px, intersectionX);
      py = append(py, intersectionY);
    }
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}
void refresh(){
  added = false;
  px = new float[0];
  py = new float[0];
  r1 = new float[l];
  r2 = new float[l];
  
  px = append(px, 0);
  py = append(py, 0);
  px = append(px, 0);
  py = append(py, height);
  px = append(px, width);
  py = append(py, 0);
  px = append(px, width);
  py = append(py, height);
  
  for(int i=0; i< r1.length; i++){
    r1[i] = random(800);
  }
  for(int i=0; i< r2.length; i++){
    r2[i] = random(800);
  }
  for(int i=0; i < r1.length; i++){
      stroke(0);
      line(r1[i], 0, r2[i], height);
      px = append(px, r1[i]);
      py = append(py, 0);
      px = append(px, r2[i]);
      py = append(py, height);
  }
}
void keyReleased() {
  if (key == 'r') refresh();
}
4
  • I suggest you to add your programming language in your tags. Aug 9, 2021 at 3:51
  • I couldn't understand your question. Are you having some specific programming issue? Is that a general programming question? Or is that a geometry / linear algebra issue? Aug 9, 2021 at 3:53
  • 1
    Thank you for looking into the question and suggesting traveling salesman problem. I am using Processing IDE, and the question is about both Processing syntax and geometry in general: how to detect separate shapes as lines intersect with each other. My approach in the source code may not be right, but eventually I want to get separate shapes as lines split the canvas (to apply different colors to each divided shape). I added a new image to clarify my question. Aug 9, 2021 at 4:57
  • Oh, my mistake. I didn't even know that language, so processing seemed to me just a random broad keyword. :) So that's a specific question I cannot answer. Good luck, though. :) Aug 9, 2021 at 5:01

3 Answers 3

2

If you want to draw a shape made of the intersection points only you're on the right track with beginShape()/endShape().

Currently it looks like you're placing all the points in px, py: the intersection points and also the points defining the lines used to compute the intersections in the first place.

You might want to separate the two, for example a couply of arrays for points defining lines only and another pair of x,y arrays for the intersection points only. You'd only need to iterated through the intersected coordinates to place vertex(x, y) calls inbetween beginShape()/endShape(). Here's a modified version of you code to illustrate the idea:

//Run in Processing.
//Press r to refresh.
//Top and bottom points are added to px and py when refreshed (filled in black).
//Intersection points are added to px and py when detected (filled in red).
int l = 4; //set number of lines
float[] r1 = new float[l];
float[] r2 = new float[l];
float[] px = {}; //array to save x positions of all possible points
float[] py = {}; //array to save y positions of all possible points
float[] ipx = {}; // array to save x for intersections only
float[] ipy = {}; // array to save y for intersections only
boolean added = false;

void setup(){
  size(800, 800);
  background(255);
  
  refresh();
}
void draw(){ 
  background(255);
  stroke(0, 150, 255, 150);
  strokeWeight(1);
  for(int i=0; i < r1.length; i++){
    for(int j=0; j < r1.length; j++){
      if(i>j){
      boolean hit = lineLine(r1[i], 0, r2[i], height, r1[j], 0, r2[j], height);
      if (hit) stroke(255, 150, 0, 150);
      else stroke(0, 150, 255, 150);
      }
    line(r1[i], 0, r2[i], height);
    }
  }
  added = true;
  
  // draw intersections
  beginShape();
  for(int i = 0 ; i < ipx.length; i++){
    vertex(ipx[i], ipy[i]);
  }
  endShape();
  
  //print(px.length);
  //println(px.length, py.length);
}
//source: http://jeffreythompson.org/collision-detection/line-line.php
boolean lineLine(float x1, float y1, float x2, float y2, float x3, float y3, float x4, float y4) {
  // calculate the distance to intersection point
  float uA = ((x4-x3)*(y1-y3) - (y4-y3)*(x1-x3)) / ((y4-y3)*(x2-x1) - (x4-x3)*(y2-y1));
  float uB = ((x2-x1)*(y1-y3) - (y2-y1)*(x1-x3)) / ((y4-y3)*(x2-x1) - (x4-x3)*(y2-y1));
  // if uA and uB are between 0-1, lines are colliding
  if (uA >= 0 && uA <= 1 && uB >= 0 && uB <= 1) {
    // optionally, draw a circle where the lines meet
    float intersectionX = x1 + (uA * (x2-x1));
    float intersectionY = y1 + (uA * (y2-y1));
    fill(255,0,0);
    noStroke();
    ellipse(intersectionX,intersectionY, 20,20);
    if(added==false){
      px = append(px, intersectionX);
      py = append(py, intersectionY);
      
      // store intersections
      ipx = append(ipx, intersectionX);
      ipy = append(ipy, intersectionY);
      
    }
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}
void refresh(){
  added = false;
  px = new float[0];
  py = new float[0];
  ipx = new float[0];
  ipy = new float[0];
  r1 = new float[l];
  r2 = new float[l];
  
  px = append(px, 0);
  py = append(py, 0);
  px = append(px, 0);
  py = append(py, height);
  px = append(px, width);
  py = append(py, 0);
  px = append(px, width);
  py = append(py, height);
  
  for(int i=0; i< r1.length; i++){
    r1[i] = random(800);
  }
  for(int i=0; i< r2.length; i++){
    r2[i] = random(800);
  }
  for(int i=0; i < r1.length; i++){
      stroke(0);
      line(r1[i], 0, r2[i], height);
      px = append(px, r1[i]);
      py = append(py, 0);
      px = append(px, r2[i]);
      py = append(py, height);
  }
  
}
void keyReleased() {
  if (key == 'r') refresh();
}

Bare in mind this simlpy draws the points in the order in which the intersections were computed. On a good day you'll get something like this:

triangle defined by intersection of lines

It doesn't exclude the possiblity of polygons with the wrong vertex order (winding):

ribbon defined by intersection of lines: instead of a quad, the wrong winding order generates the ribbon

and you might be get convave polygons too.

If you only need the outer 'shell' of these intersection points you might need something like a convex hull algorithm

One option to at least visually split shapes might to use beginShape(TRIANGLES); with endShape(CLOSE); which should iterate through points and draw a triangle for every coordinate triplate, however given random points and number of interesections you might end up with a missing triangle or two (e.g. 6 points = 2 triangles, 7 points = 2 triangles and 1 point with no missing pairs)

The only other note I have is around syntax: arrays are ok to get started with but you might want to look into ArrayList and PVector. This would allow you to use a single dynamic array of PVector instances which have x, y properties.

Update

Overall the code can be simplified. If we take out the line intersection related code we can get away with something like:

int l = 4; //set number of random lines
float[] r1 = new float[l];  // random x top
float[] r2 = new float[l];  // random x bottom

void setup() {
  size(800, 800);
  strokeWeight(3);
  stroke(0, 150, 255, 150);
  
  refresh();
}

void draw() { 
  background(255);
  
  // random lines
  for (int i=0; i < r1.length; i++) {
    line(r1[i], 0, r2[i], height);
  }
  
  // borders
  line(0, 0, width, 0);
  line(width, 0, width - 1, height - 1);
  line(0, height - 1, width - 1, height - 1);
  line(0, 0, 0, height - 1);
}

void refresh() {
  r1 = new float[l];
  r2 = new float[l];

  for (int i=0; i< r1.length; i++) {
    r1[i] = random(800);
    r2[i] = random(800);
  }
}

void keyReleased() {
  if (key == 'r') refresh();
}

If we were to use a basic Line class and make use of PVector and ArrayList we could rewrite the above as:

int numRandomLines = 4;
ArrayList<PVector> points = new ArrayList<PVector>();


void setup() {
  size(800, 800);
  stroke(0, 150, 255, 150);
  strokeWeight(3);
  refresh();
}

void refresh(){
  // remove previous points
  points.clear();
  //add borders
  points.add(new PVector(0, 0)); points.add(new PVector(width, 0));
  points.add(new PVector(width, 0));points.add(new PVector(width - 1, height - 1));
  points.add(new PVector(0, height - 1));points.add(new PVector(width - 1, height - 1));
  points.add(new PVector(0, 0)); points.add(new PVector(0, height - 1));
  // add random lines
  for (int i=0; i< numRandomLines; i++) {
    points.add(new PVector(random(800), 0));  points.add(new PVector(random(800), height));
  }
}

void draw(){
  background(255);
  
  beginShape(LINES);
  for(PVector point : points) vertex(point.x, point.y);
  endShape();
}

void keyReleased() {
  if (key == 'r') refresh();
}

and grouping a pair of points (PVector) into a Line class:

int numRandomLines = 4;
ArrayList<Line> lines = new ArrayList<Line>();

void setup() {
  size(800, 800);
  stroke(0, 150, 255, 150);
  strokeWeight(3);
  refresh();
}

void refresh(){
  // remove previous points
  lines.clear();
  //add borders
  lines.add(new Line(new PVector(0, 0), new PVector(width, 0)));
  lines.add(new Line(new PVector(width, 0), new PVector(width - 1, height - 1)));
  lines.add(new Line(new PVector(0, height - 1), new PVector(width - 1, height - 1)));
  lines.add(new Line(new PVector(0, 0), new PVector(0, height - 1)));
  // add random lines
  for (int i=0; i< numRandomLines; i++) {
    lines.add(new Line(new PVector(random(800), 0), new PVector(random(800), height)));
  }
}

void draw(){
  background(255);
  
  for(Line line : lines) line.draw();
}

void keyReleased() {
  if (key == 'r') refresh();
}

class Line{
  
  PVector start;
  PVector end;
  
  Line(PVector start, PVector end){
    this.start = start;
    this.end = end;
  }
  
  void draw(){
    line(start.x, start.y, end.x, end.y);
  }
}

At this stage to get the individual shapes as your diagram describes, we could cheat and use a computer vision library like OpenCV. This is if course overkill (as we'd get() a PImage copy of the drawing, convert that to an OpenCV image) then simply use findContours() to get each shape/contour.

Going back to the original approach, the line to line intersection function could be integrated into the Line class:

int numRandomLines = 4;
ArrayList<Line> lines = new ArrayList<Line>();
ArrayList<PVector> intersections = new ArrayList<PVector>();

void setup() {
  size(800, 800);
  strokeWeight(3);
  refresh();
}

void refresh(){
  // remove previous points
  lines.clear();
  intersections.clear();
  //add borders
  lines.add(new Line(new PVector(0, 0), new PVector(width, 0)));
  lines.add(new Line(new PVector(width, 0), new PVector(width - 1, height - 1)));
  lines.add(new Line(new PVector(0, height - 1), new PVector(width - 1, height - 1)));
  lines.add(new Line(new PVector(0, 0), new PVector(0, height - 1)));
  // add random lines
  for (int i=0; i< numRandomLines; i++) {
    lines.add(new Line(new PVector(random(800), 0), new PVector(random(800), height)));
  }
  // compute intersections
  int numLines = lines.size();
  // when looping only check if lineA intersects lineB but not also if lineB intersects lineA (redundant)
  for (int i = 0; i < numLines - 1; i++){
    Line lineA = lines.get(i);
    for (int j = i + 1; j < numLines; j++){
      Line lineB = lines.get(j);
      // check intersection
      PVector intersection = lineA.intersect(lineB);
      // if there is one, append the intersection point to the list
      if(intersection != null){
        intersections.add(intersection);
      }
    }
  }
}

void draw(){
  background(255);
  stroke(0, 150, 255, 150);
  // draw lines
  for(Line line : lines) line.draw();
  stroke(255, 0, 0, 150);
  // draw intersections
  for(PVector intersection : intersections) ellipse(intersection.x, intersection.y, 9, 9);
}

void keyReleased() {
  if (key == 'r') refresh();
}

class Line{
  
  PVector start;
  PVector end;
  
  Line(PVector start, PVector end){
    this.start = start;
    this.end = end;
  }
  
  void draw(){
    line(start.x, start.y, end.x, end.y);
  }
  
  //source: http://jeffreythompson.org/collision-detection/line-line.php
  //boolean lineLine(float this.start.x, float this.start.y, float this.end.x, float this.end.y, 
                   //float other.start.x, float other.start.y, float other.end.x, float other.end.y) {
  PVector intersect(Line other) {
    // calculate the distance to intersection point
    float uA = ((other.end.x-other.start.x)*(this.start.y-other.start.y) - (other.end.y-other.start.y)*(this.start.x-other.start.x)) / ((other.end.y-other.start.y)*(this.end.x-this.start.x) - (other.end.x-other.start.x)*(this.end.y-this.start.y));
    float uB = ((this.end.x-this.start.x)*(this.start.y-other.start.y) - (this.end.y-this.start.y)*(this.start.x-other.start.x)) / ((other.end.y-other.start.y)*(this.end.x-this.start.x) - (other.end.x-other.start.x)*(this.end.y-this.start.y));
    // if uA and uB are between 0-1, lines are colliding
    if (uA >= 0 && uA <= 1 && uB >= 0 && uB <= 1) {
      // optionally, draw a circle where the lines meet
      float intersectionX = this.start.x + (uA * (this.end.x-this.start.x));
      float intersectionY = this.start.y + (uA * (this.end.y-this.start.y));
      
      return new PVector(intersectionX, intersectionY);
    }
    return null;
  }
}

The next step would be a more complex algorithm to sort the points based on x, y position (e.g. top to bottom , left to right), iterate though points comparing the first to the rest by distance and angle and trying to work out if consecutive points with minimal distance and angle changes connect.

Having a quick look online I can see such algorithms for example:

CGAL c++ computational geometry library example of the sweep line algorithm displaying two orthogonal intersecting line cut by a third diagonal lower left to upper right line which connects it's tip to the horizontal: red and blue colour coded circles illustrate the intersection of these lines highlighting the interior points

2
  • Thank you! This is really helpful. It makes sense to separate intersection points only. I will try with different options of begin/endShape() methods. Aug 10, 2021 at 10:42
  • Happy to hear that. I've updated the answer with a few more code snippets illustrating another approach of organising the code. Having a second look at the colour polygons diagram that's a non trivial algorithm and unfortunately I won't have the time to provide a detailed Processing implementation but I hope the linked paper can be a good starting point. Aug 11, 2021 at 1:53
2

I can see your code isn't javascript but since you didn't specify a language I assume you just want a method and can convert to your language.

The way I handled this was to assign each line a line number. If I can identify 2 adjacent points on one line then I will know if the third point exist by checking if there is a point at the crossing of the lines they are not sharing.

Example: There's 3 lines (line 1, 2, 3)

I have an intersection point between lines 3 & 1 now I walk down line 3 for an adjacent point. I find one and its intersection is 3 & 2. Well the only way I could have a triangle is by lines 1 & 2 crossing somewhere. So we can programmatically check that.

Keep in mind that I never actually use and angles for this. I do calculate them in the functions but decided not to use them as I went with the method explained above. I have colored the triangles using an alpha value of 0.1 so you can see where there is overlap.

This is only check triangles

let canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
        let ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
        canvas.width = 400;
        canvas.height = 400;

        let lines = []; //holds each line
        let points = []; //all intersection point are pushed here [{x: num, y: num}, {x: num, y: num},...]
        let sortedPts = []; //all points sorted bu first number are pushed here in 2d array.
        let lineNum = 15;

        class Lines {
            constructor(num) {
                this.x = Math.round(Math.random() * canvas.width);
                this.x2 = Math.round(Math.random() * canvas.width);
                this.pt1 = {
                    x: this.x,
                    y: 0
                };
                this.pt2 = {
                    x: this.x2,
                    y: canvas.height
                };
                this.num = num;
                this.rads = Math.atan2(this.pt2.y - this.pt1.y, this.pt2.x - this.pt1.x);
                this.angle = this.rads * (180 / Math.PI);
            }
            draw() {
                ctx.beginPath();
                ctx.moveTo(this.pt1.x, this.pt1.y);
                ctx.lineTo(this.pt2.x, this.pt2.y);
                ctx.stroke();
            }
        }

        //creates the lines. I also use this function to prepare the 2d array by pushing an empty array for each line into sortedPts.
        function createLines() {
            for (let i = 0; i < lineNum; i++) {
                lines.push(new Lines(i + 1));
                sortedPts.push([])
            }
        }
        createLines();

        //Visually draws lines on screen
        function drawLines() {
            for (let i = 0; i < lines.length; i++) {
                lines[i].draw();
            }
        }
        drawLines();

        //intersecting formula
        function lineSegmentsIntersect(line1, line2) {
            let a_dx = line1.pt2.x - line1.pt1.x;
            let a_dy = line1.pt2.y - line1.pt1.y;
            let b_dx = line2.pt2.x - line2.pt1.x;
            let b_dy = line2.pt2.y - line2.pt1.y;
            let s =
                (-a_dy * (line1.pt1.x - line2.pt1.x) + a_dx * (line1.pt1.y - line2.pt1.y)) /
                (-b_dx * a_dy + a_dx * b_dy);
            let t =
                (+b_dx * (line1.pt1.y - line2.pt1.y) - b_dy * (line1.pt1.x - line2.pt1.x)) /
                (-b_dx * a_dy + a_dx * b_dy);
            if (s >= 0 && s <= 1 && t >= 0 && t <= 1) {
                //this is where we create our array but we also add the line number of where each point intersects. I also add the angle but have not used it throughout the rest of this...yet.
                points.push({
                    x: Math.round(line1.pt1.x + t * (line1.pt2.x - line1.pt1.x)),
                    y: Math.round(line1.pt1.y + t * (line1.pt2.y - line1.pt1.y)),
                    num: {
                        first: line1.num,
                        second: line2.num
                    },
                    angle: {
                        a1: line1.angle,
                        a2: line2.angle
                    }
                });
            }
        }

        //just checks each line against the others by passing to lineSegmentsIntersect() function
        function callIntersect() {
            for (let i = 0; i < lines.length; i++) {
                for (let j = i + 1; j < lines.length; j++) {
                    lineSegmentsIntersect(lines[i], lines[j]);
                }
            }
        }
        callIntersect();

        function drawPoints() {
            //just draws the black points for reference
            for (let i = 0; i < points.length; i++) {
                ctx.beginPath();
                ctx.arc(points[i].x, points[i].y, 2, 0, Math.PI * 2);
                ctx.fill();
            }
        }
        drawPoints();

        function createSortedArray() {
            //Now we take the points array and sort the points by the first number to make using i and j below possible
            points.sort((a, b) => a.num.first - b.num.first)
            //We push each group of points into an array inside sortedPts creating the 2d array 
            for (let i = 0; i < lineNum; i++) {
                for (let j = 0; j < points.length; j++) {
                    if (points[j].num.first == (i + 1)) {
                        sortedPts[i].push(points[j]);
                    }
                }
            }
            //now sort the 2d arrays by y value. This allows or next check to go in order from point to point per line.
            sortedPts.forEach(arr => arr.sort((a, b) => a.y - b.y));

            fillTriangles();
        }
        createSortedArray();

        /*
        The last step iterates through each point in the original points array
        and check to see if either the first or second number matches the second
        number of a point in our sortedPts array AND do the first or second number
        match the next points in the sortedPtsd array. If so then we must have a
        triangle.

        Quick breakdown. If we have 3 lines (line 1, 2, 3) and I have a points on lines
        2 & 3. I also have another point on lines 2 & 1. Then in order to have a triangle
        the last point must be on lines 1 & 3. 

        That's all this is doing.
        */
        function fillTriangles() {
            //iterate through each array inside sortedPts array
            for (let i = 0; i < sortedPts.length; i++) {
                //iterate through all points inside each array of points inside the sortedPts array
                for (let j = 0; j < sortedPts[i].length - 1; j++) {
                    //iterate over the original points and compare
                    for (let k = 0; k < points.length; k++) {
                        if (
                            (points[k].num.first == sortedPts[i][j].num.second ||
                                points[k].num.second == sortedPts[i][j].num.second) &&
                            (points[k].num.first == sortedPts[i][j + 1].num.second ||
                                points[k].num.second == sortedPts[i][j + 1].num.second)
                        ) {
                            ctx.fillStyle = "rgba(200, 100, 0, 0.1)";
                            ctx.beginPath();
                            ctx.moveTo(sortedPts[i][j].x, sortedPts[i][j].y);
                            ctx.lineTo(sortedPts[i][j + 1].x, sortedPts[i][j + 1].y);
                            ctx.lineTo(points[k].x, points[k].y);
                            ctx.closePath();
                            ctx.fill();
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
<canvas id="canvas"></canvas>

I also think there's a good way to do this with the angles of the crossing lines and am working on something to do it that way. I am hoping I can get it to determine the type of shape based on the number of sides but I don't see that being a quick project.

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  • Thank you! It's a great idea to assign ids to lines. I am not familiar with javascript but am able to follow through your steps. I will apply them to Processing code! Aug 10, 2021 at 10:44
1

Your goal is not clear to me. You can connect any arbitrary set of points in any arbitrary order and call it a shape. What are your criteria?

If you want to find the shortest path that connects all the points of a given subset, I suggest looking for travelling salesman problem.

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