8
sub a { my @c = 1, 2, 3, 4;     return @c };
sub b { my $d = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]; return $d };

say a().WHAT; # (Array)
say b().WHAT; # (Array)

my @e = a();
my @f = b();

say @e;     # [1 2 3 4]
say @e[1];  # 2

say @f;     # [[1 2 3 4]]
say @f[1];  # (Any)

# valid raku code, no errors messages

These subroutines both return an array, but the returned arrays behave differently. What would be the correct expression to make clear in the documentation which array type is returned by the subroutine?

sub b ( --> Array ) { my $d = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]; return $d };
say b().WHAT;       # (Array)
sub b ( --> Scalar ) { my $d = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]; return $d };
say b().WHAT;

# Type check failed for return value; expected Scalar but got Array ([1, 2, 3, 4])
#   in sub b at ...
#   in block <unit> at ...
2
  • 3
    They behave differently because you are returning different things. One is an array - a list of things - while the second returns a Scalar - a single thing - which happens to contain an array. See docs.raku.org/language/…
    – Holli
    Aug 8, 2021 at 18:32
  • 1
    @Holli: I know that I am returning different things which behave differently.
    – sid_com
    Aug 9, 2021 at 3:02

2 Answers 2

9

This is all about a Scalar that hasn't decontainerized.

You could change return $d to return @$d

One option to get the same behavior is to alter the b routine.

You have written "These subroutines both return an array, but the returned arrays behave differently.". But, as Holli notes, b instead returns the Scalar bound to $d (that in turn contains an array):

sub b { my $d = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]; return $d };
say b().VAR.WHAT; # (Scalar)

You could change that by "decontainerizing" $d, eg by prepending @:

sub b { my $d = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]; return @$d };
say b().VAR.WHAT; # (Array)

my @f = b();

say @f;     # [1 2 3 4]
say @f[1];  # 2

Or change @f = b() to @f = b[]

If you don't decontainerize the value returned by b, then a second issue / opportunity arises.

Regardless of what b returns, the @f assignment will evaluate the list of values being assigned to it. In a list context, Scalars are left as is (just as they were with a plain return $d). So if you do not change b to decontainerize, then you'll need to do so in the assignment to @f instead, if you want @e and @f to end up the same.

This time you can't just prepend @ to do so. Because that would spell @b -- which Raku would interpret as an @b variable.

One option is to write @f = @(b()), but that would be ugly / non-idiomatic. Another option is to write @f = b[]. This takes advantage of the fact that the parens in the b calls were redundant. Appending [] (a "zen slice") has the same effect as writing @(b), but is one character less.

So, to decontainerize in the list assignment, you could write:

sub b { my $d = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]; return $d };
say b().VAR.WHAT; # (Scalar)

my @f = b[];

say @f;     # [1 2 3 4]
say @f[1];  # 2

"to make clear in the documentation"

What would be the correct expression to make clear in the documentation which array type what is returned by the subroutine?

I'm not sure what you mean by this question, even with the switch to merely "what is returned".

I'm also not sure what to point you to in the doc, and even if there is anywhere good to point you to, relative to the scenario in your SO.

I do know that, if it were me, I'd find the following doc sections confusing, relative to your scenario:

  • The Scalar containers and listy things section Holli linked. That section seems to me to currently be about use of Scalar containers inside lists/arrays, which is relevant for the second issue I wrote about above ($d is in a list on the rhs of the assignment to @f). But that's not relevant to the first issue I wrote about (return $d from the b routine). There things are the other way around, namely there's an array inside a Scalar.

  • The Scalar containers section earlier on the same page. The opening sentence -- "Although objects of type Scalar are everywhere in Raku, you rarely see them directly as objects, because most operations decontainerize ..." works for me. But "a routine can return a container if it is marked as is rw" is more problematic. It is true:

my $x = 23;
sub f() is rw { $x };
f() = 42;
say $x;                 # OUTPUT: «42␤»

But one doesn't have to mark a routine is rw to return a container. One can use the return routine, as you did:

my $x = 23;
sub f() { return $x };
say f().VAR.WHAT;       # OUTPUT: «Scalar␤»
4
  • 1
    I will decontainerize the variable according to your suggestion ( $d[] ). In the documentation I just write that the subroutine returns an array. It is not so difficult for the user to find out how the array is returned.
    – sid_com
    Aug 9, 2021 at 4:53
  • 3
    @sid_com Having slept on it, and especially if you're writing doc that aligns return @d with return $d, I recommend that, to list contextualize, the latter be written return @$d rather than $d[]. If the user uses the doc web site search field to search the doc for @, then the second entry right now is "@ list contextualizer", which is the right bit of info, whereas given a search of the doc for [], the only entry that's even remotely close is the last one, and it really doesn't help imo. Realistically one would have to search for "Zen slices", but how would a newbie know that?
    – raiph
    Aug 9, 2021 at 10:49
  • 1
    hi, I get the impression that last two snippets achieve same things but f() = 84 for the last one errs. But I think the point is that both return a container but one happens to be read-writable; is that so? Also return-rw's doc reads "The sub return will return values, not containers."; I suppose this is not correct as you showed but I might be missing something wrt terminology. Aug 12, 2021 at 8:52
  • 1
    @MustafaAydın "[perhaps] both [return and return-rw] return a container but one happens to be read-writable?" ➊ I hoped someone might comment as you have. Our comments now succinctly introduce issues related to this, which delights me. So, first, thanks! ➋ It's definitely a Scalar in both cases. ➌ Presumably the doc writers prefer the pedagogical facilitation of referring to a read-only Scalar as a value because they seem, referential-transparency-wise, equivalent. ➍ I predict someone will one day post a Q about such matters... ;)
    – raiph
    Aug 12, 2021 at 13:01
1

The original question asks why the following error occurs:

sub b ( --> Scalar ) { my $d = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]; return $d };
say b().WHAT;

# Type check failed for return value; expected Scalar but got Array ([1, 2, 3, 4])
#   in sub b at ...
#   in block <unit> at ...

This answer is intended to elaborate on constraints of the return type as documented here

If you do this, now you are returning a Scalar:

sub b( --> Scalar ) { my $x=42; my $d = $x; return $d };
say b().WHAT;

You get a different error

Type check failed for return value; expected Scalar but got Int (42)
  in sub b at scum.raku line 2
  in block <unit> at scum.raku line 7

What is going on here?

Well raku automatically decontainerizes the Scalar $x before testing the type - this is how Scalar containers work. So run of the mill code you should be using concrete return type constraints like Int, Real, Num, IntStr, Allomorph, Cool and so on. Raku built in types are beautifully crafted to give the coder precise control of the level of this test.

BUT - if you want to do power tricks, then you can apply the --> Scalar constraint like this (as mentioned by @raiph):

sub b( --> Scalar ) { my $x=42; my $d = $x.VAR; return $d };
say b().WHAT;   #(Scalar)

In other words, the meta method .VAR bypasses the normal transparent decont of Scalar containers to let you test whether or not your return type is top level a container.

So (as I am sure you have gathered from raiph's better answer) please document --> Scalar as a rare form as opposed to the common --> Array check.

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