1

I'm trying to understand why both :

#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
    char buffer[8] = "Hello \n";
    write(1, buffer, 7);
    return 0;
}

and

#include <unistd.h> 

int main()
{
   char buffer[8];
   char *ptr = buffer;
   ptr = "Hello \n";
   write(1, ptr, 7);
   return 0;
}

successfully output "Hello " to the console but

#include <unistd.h> 

int main()
{
   char buffer[8];
   char *ptr = buffer;
   ptr = "Hello \n";
   write(1, buffer, 7);
   retrun 0;
}

doesn't (instead it outputs gibberish) when I expect all three to be essentially the same.

I'm guessing there is something fundamentally wrong in my understanding of the relationship between pointers and arrays in c ...

3
  • 2
    A pointer stores the address of some memory. Changing the pointer does not change the contents of what it was pointing to. It just points it somewhere else. So in the last two examples the pointer is changed from pointing to the buffer memory to a string literal. The original buffer content is unchanged.
    – kaylum
    Aug 8, 2021 at 22:49
  • 2
    buffer and ptr are two different variables (with different types to boot). If you have two int variables, assigning a value to one of them will not affect the other.
    – jxh
    Aug 8, 2021 at 22:54
  • A pointer variable can be used to affect the value of the thing being pointed at, but you must dereference the pointer to address the referenced object.
    – jxh
    Aug 8, 2021 at 22:57

1 Answer 1

3

You're conflating a couple of different, unrelated issues here:

 char buffer[8];      // You're allocating 8 bytes: OK
 char *ptr = buffer;  // You're aliasing "ptr" to "&buffer[0]": OK
 ptr = "Hello \n";    // Now you're ASSIGNING ptr to a completely DIFFERENT address
 write(1, buffer, 7); // You never actually assigned any data to buffer

Suppose, instead, you did this:

 char buffer[8];      // Allocate 8 bytes
 char *ptr = buffer;  // Aliasing "ptr" to "&buffer[0]"
 strcpy(ptr, "Hello \n"); // Now you've actually assigned data
 write(1, buffer, 7); /. You should no longer see "garbage" ;)

In other words, this issue isn't so much "pointers vs. arrays"; it's really "correctly initializing whatever it is you're pointing to".

'Hope that helps...

1
  • Ah that makes sense, thanks a lot. I guess I didn't understand how string literals worked more so than pointers...
    – Naja
    Aug 8, 2021 at 22:54

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