1

Say I have two numpy arrays

prediction = np.array([1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1])
groundtrue = np.array([1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1])

I would like to compare the two arrays, including a classification of each index comparison. So I want to classify if both prediction and groundtrue have 1s, or if prediction has 1 and groundtrue has 0, or vise versa, etc.

So an example desired result could look like this

comparison = np.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 3, 4, 4, 1])

1 is used if both have 1s. 2 is used if both have 0s. 3 is used if if prediction has 0 and groundtrue has 1. etc.

The most straight forward way is to use a loop and directly compare each index but it seems that numpy may have some operators that can do this very computationally efficiently and much less lines of code

np.where(prediction == groundtrue, 1, 0)

Can get me an array where the two values are equal, or not, but I don't see it giving different types of comparisons.

2
  • 4
    prediction + 2 * groundtrue will give a classification, might not be the order you wanted though.
    – Psidom
    Aug 9, 2021 at 1:13
  • 2
    This solves my answer. You can submit this as an answer and I'll select it. Aug 9, 2021 at 1:18

3 Answers 3

3

Since you have only 0s and 1s in prediction and groundtrue, there will be only 4 cases in total. Hence you can create a classification with:

prediction + 2 * groundtrue
# array([3, 0, 2, 1, 3, 2, 1, 1, 3])

It won't be the same order as in OP, but enough to distinguish different cases.

  • 0 if both prediction and groudtrue are 0s;
  • 1 if groudtrue is 0 and prediction is 1;
  • 2 if groudtrue is 1 and prediction is 0;
  • 3 if both are 1s;
2

One can do this with boolean masks.

import numpy as np

prediction = np.array([1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1])
groundtrue = np.array([1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1])

comparison = np.zeros_like(prediction)
comparison[(prediction==1) & (groundtrue==1)] = 1
comparison[(prediction==0) & (groundtrue==0)] = 2
comparison[(prediction==0) & (groundtrue==1)] = 3
comparison[(prediction==1) & (groundtrue==0)] = 4
comparison  # array([1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 3, 4, 4, 1])

The following gives the same output as the above, but you only need to compute two masks. This assumes that prediction and ground truth can only have values of 0 or 1.

import numpy as np

prediction = np.array([1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1])
groundtrue = np.array([1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1])

pred0 = prediction == 0
ground0 = groundtrue == 0
comparison = np.zeros_like(prediction)
comparison[~pred0 & ~ground0] = 1
comparison[pred0 & ground0] = 2
comparison[pred0 & ~ground0] = 3
comparison[~pred0 & ground0] = 4
comparison  # array([1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 3, 4, 4, 1])

The masks will have boolean values, where each value indicates whether the condition is true in the original array.

x = np.array([0, 1])
x == 0  # array([ True, False])

The & operator will compute the logical AND of both boolean arrays. See numpy.logical_and for more information.

Then, one can use the boolean mask to subset certain values. We can assign that subset of indices a new value.

x = np.array([0, 1])
x[x==0] = 2
x  # array([2, 1])
1

You can try using code like this:

import numpy as np
prediction = np.array([1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1])
groundtrue = np.array([1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1])
lut=np.array([2,4,3,1]) #look up table
pow_two=2**np.arange(2)
comparison=lut[np.dot(pow_two, np.vstack((prediction, groundtrue)))]

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