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I have this tibble/dataframe:

library(tidyverse)

df <- tibble(
  a = c(FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE),
  b = c(FALSE, TRUE, TRUE, FALSE),
  c = c(FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE)
)

# A tibble: 4 x 3
  a     b     c    
  <lgl> <lgl> <lgl>
1 FALSE FALSE FALSE
2 FALSE TRUE  FALSE
3 FALSE TRUE  TRUE 
4 TRUE FALSE FALSE

by first TRUE I mean:

positions:

enter image description here

distances:

# A tibble: 4 x 3
      a     b     c
  <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
1     0     1     2
2     1     2     3
3     2     3     4
4     3     4     5

The distance from c(2, 2) to c(1,1) is two steps (one left and one up) (distance = 2), so every cell has a distance from c(1, 1). The first TRUE with the minimum distance is the first TRUE, so the desired output in this example is c(2,2); when you have two or more cells first TRUE with equal distance, you put them in a list as a result like this list(c(1, 2), c(4, 3)). I figured this is called manhattan distance.

11
  • 1
    Do you mean the desired output would be list(c(2, 3), c(3, 2)) for the second case. Shouldn't the first TRUE position always be only 1 position ? What is the logic of returning c(2, 3) and c(3, 2) ?
    – Ronak Shah
    Aug 9, 2021 at 2:11
  • They are at the same distance from c(1,1) Aug 9, 2021 at 3:04
  • In the first case c(2,2) is the nearest from c(1,1) Aug 9, 2021 at 3:05
  • How do you calculate the distance ? How do you know which one is nearest?
    – Ronak Shah
    Aug 9, 2021 at 3:10
  • But c(1, 3) is the "first TRUE in any row or column" for row 1 and for column 3; c(2, 2) is the first TRUE for row 2 and column 2; and c(3, 1) is the first TRUE for row 3 and column.
    – dcarlson
    Aug 9, 2021 at 3:11

1 Answer 1

0

Try this

dst <- (row(df) - 1) + (col(df) - 1)
dst[as.matrix(!df)] <- NA
which(dst==min(dst, na.rm=TRUE), arr.ind=TRUE)
#      row col
# [1,]   2   2

The results will be a matrix with 1 or more rows. You can convert that to a list if necessary.

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