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I want to essentially map a set to an array after calling someMethod on each element. Should I loop through using a foreach loop and a "i" variable outside, or use a regular for loop and iterator?

int[] arr = new int[set.size()];
int i = 0;
for(int ele : set) {
  arr[i] = someMethod(ele);
  i++;
}

or

int[] arr = new int[set.size()];
Iterator<Integer> iterator = set.iterator();
for(int i=0; i<set.size(); i++) {
  arr[i] = someMethod(iterator.next().intValue());
}

4 Answers 4

2

Both methods are equally good but for loop is slightly faster than forEach loop,

There are some other methods to convert set to array given below. You can use toArray() function :

    int[] arr = new int[set.size()];
    arr = set.toArray(arr);

or you can use stream in java 8 or above:

  int[] arr = set.stream().toArray(int[] ::new);

Another method is by using Arrays.copyOf

int[] arr = Arrays.copyOf(set.toArray(), set.size(), Integer[].class);
2
  • While a for loop is slightly faster than an equivalent for each loop, this for loop is not equivalent to a simple for each loop. If you look carefully, the for loop version is both incrementing a variable and iterating an iterator. This is slower than both a simple for and a simple for each.
    – Stephen C
    Aug 9, 2021 at 7:30
  • but this is not what OP looks for: after calling someMethod on each element.
    – tostao
    Aug 10, 2021 at 19:07
1

tl;dr

Both of your loops are equivalent.

You can use streams to make a one-liner, where the stream does the looping for you.

int[] arrayOfInts =
        Set
                .of( 1 , 2 , 3 )
                .stream()
                .mapToInt( Integer :: intValue )
                .map( integer -> Math.multiplyExact( integer , integer ) )
                .sorted()
                .toArray();

arrayOfInts = [1, 4, 9]

Either loop is good

Both of your loops work well.

Choose whichever is easiest to read and understand. For me that would usually be the for-each syntax, as seen in your first loop.

By the way, that first loop could be shortened. The i++ syntax pulls out and utilizes the value of i before incrementing. So you can nest the i++ inside your array index accessor.

Set < Integer > set = Set.of( 1 , 2 , 3 );
int[] arr = new int[ set.size() ];
int i = 0;
for ( int element : set ) {
    arr[ i++ ] = Math.multiplyExact( element , element );  // Auto-boxing converts `Integer` objects into `int` primitive values.
}

System.out.println( "arr = " + Arrays.toString( arr ) );

arr = [1, 9, 4]

Stream instead of loop

The Answer by Pranav Choudhary is correct. But you also mentioned wanting to apply a method to modify your number before assigning to the array.

Java streams make it easy to perform such a modification during collection.

Define our Set of Integer objects.

Set < Integer > set = Set.of( 1 , 2 , 3 );

Create a stream of int primitives, boxed from our Integer objects.

IntStream intStream = set.stream().mapToInt( Integer :: intValue );

Apply your modification. Here we square each number. The Math.multiplyExact method is handy because it will throw an ArithmeticException if we overflow the limits of the 32-bit int type. We collect each resulting square as an int in our array.

int[] arrayOfInts = intStream.map( integer -> Math.multiplyExact( integer , integer ) ).toArray();

Dump to console.

System.out.println( "arrayOfInts = " + Arrays.toString( arrayOfInts ) );

When run.

arrayOfInts = [9, 4, 1]

Notice the order of the output. A Set by definition has no determined iteration order. To emphasize that, the Set.of method reserves the right to use an implementation of Set that randomly changes its iteration. So each time you run this code you may see a different ordering of results.

If you care about order, add that to your stream work. Add a call to sorted().

int[] arrayOfInts = intStream.map( integer -> Math.multiplyExact( integer , integer ) ).sorted().toArray();

When run, we get consistent ordering. See this code run live at IdeOne.com.

arrayOfInts = [1, 4, 9]

Not that I recommend it, but we could turn this code into a one-liner.

int[] arrayOfInts = Set.of( 1 , 2 , 3 ).stream().mapToInt( Integer :: intValue ).map( integer -> Math.multiplyExact( integer , integer ) ).sorted().toArray();

Or:

int[] arrayOfInts =
        Set
                .of( 1 , 2 , 3 )
                .stream()
                .mapToInt( Integer :: intValue )
                .map( integer -> Math.multiplyExact( integer , integer ) )
                .sorted()
                .toArray();

See this code run live at IdeOne.com.

arrayOfInts = [1, 4, 9]

1

Both versions are correct in the sense that they both give the same result.

However, in my opinion the first version is the preferable of the two.

  • It is easier to understand for an average Java programmer.
  • It is more concise. Fewer lines of code. Simpler statements.
  • It will probably be faster ... unless the optimizer is amazingly clever.

If it was me, I would save a line and write it like this:

for(int ele : set) {
  arr[i++] = someMethod(ele);
}

but that is just my old C habits shining through.


As others have pointed out, in Java 8+ there is an even more concise way to write this; e.g. see this answer.

0

With java8:

    Integer[] arr = set.stream().map(element -> doSomething(element)).toArray(Integer[]::new);

Where doSomething() is your method which you can call -

calling someMethod on each element.

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