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I have the knowledge of unit testing standalone functions like helper classes but how do I deal with functions that are not standalone, typically within a class file that has multiple validations and results?

Example below showing multiple conditions check and response in different result.

  • Do I call the valueCheck and proceedApiCheck function in my test case? But there're different scenarios or actions I don't need within test. (eg, setState / navigating)
  • Do I write a new function of valueCheck and proceedApiCheck in my test case? But this will means I'm having 2 different logic in my code. Someday if I change my logic in app, my test case will not fail since it's referring to the old logic.

Can any of you shed some light on this?

Example

export class Screen1 extends React.Component {

    valueCheck = (value) => {
        if(value === 'abc'){
            this.setState({ isNavigating:true, transfer: true })
            this.proceedApiCheck(value)
        }
        if(value === '123'){
            this.setState({ isNavigating:true, transfer: false })
            this.proceedApiCheck(value)
        }
    }

    proceedApiCheck = async(value) =>{
        let data
        try{
            data = await FirstApi(value);
            this.setState(data)
        }catch(){
            this.navigateToScreen('Failure')
            return;
        }

        switch(data.name){
            case 'fake adidas':
                this.navigateToScreen('Failure')
                return;
            case 'fake nike':
                this.navigateToScreen('Failure')
                return; 
        }
        
        try{
            const result = await secondApi(data.price);

            switch(result.currency){
                case 'EURO':
                    this.navigateToScreen('Euro')
                case 'Pound':
                    this.navigateToScreen('Pound')
                default: 
                    this.navigateToScreen('Dollar')
            }
        }catch(){
            this.navigateToScreen('Failure')
            return;
        }
    }


}
6
  • You're question seems subjective and too open-ended, it's unclear what you really want answered. Try to provide an example unit test case and narrow down the focus of your query. I suggest also looking into React-Testing-Library for your UI unit testing..
    – Drew Reese
    Aug 9, 2021 at 8:29
  • Hi @DrewReese, appreciate on your comments. I have updated my question to be very specific in testing non standalone functions. Thank you for pointing out. My query is really how UnitTest can always refer to 1 piece of logic, hence when updating the app logic, does not require us to update UnitTest logic. That's my confusion.
    – TommyLeong
    Aug 9, 2021 at 8:39
  • I'm not sure I follow your confusion. You export/import the functions/components you want to unit test.
    – Drew Reese
    Aug 9, 2021 at 8:41
  • Ah, I think I understand the confusion... this is also why I pointed you to RTL.... the gist is simply that you don't "reach" into React components and touch the internal implementations when unit testing, but rather that you interact with the component via it's APIs, i.e. the props and the UI, the same way other components and users would. If you need to, or can, you can pull a certain chunk of code out into a utility function and test in isolation, though this is not possible if they are coupled to component state updates.
    – Drew Reese
    Aug 9, 2021 at 8:44
  • @TommyLeong To do unit test, write testable code for any unit you need to cover. In your case that two functions are not good units but the Screen1. try to write unit case for Screen1 with mock data which will call valueCheck
    – Horst
    Aug 9, 2021 at 10:21

2 Answers 2

1

You've made a valuable discovery:

The most straightforward way to write code is not necessarily the most robust way to write code.

This unfortunate problem is exacerbated by the way most people use classes: the implicit this reference makes it very easy to do too much in one method, let alone one class. And that has led you to a second valuable discovery:

One of the most valuable things about isolated unit tests is they give you feedback on your design.

Here the difficulty isolating the test is telling you that you've coupled separate concerns in a way that's difficult to tease apart. You've got a method with seven (7!!) different exit points, and now you're stuck because that's a lot of mocking to try to trigger the appropriate logic to make sure you hit all of them.

Consider the following alternative:

const FAIL = {}; // could also use Symbol() here, any unique ref
const BAD_NAMES = ['fake whatever'];
async function apiCall1() {
  const resp = await fetch(someURL);
  return resp.json();
}

function validate1(data) {
  return data?.name === undefined || BAD_NAMES.includes(data?.name) 
    ? FAIL 
    : data.name;
}

// You can imagine what validation and fetching look like for
// the second API call

function processData(data) {
  switch(data.currency){
    case 'EURO':
      return 'Euro';
    case 'Pound':
      return 'Pound';
    default: 
      return 'Dollar';
  }
}

async function doTheThing() { // use a better name IRL
  try {
    const first = await apiCall1();
    const data = validate1(first);
    if (data === FAIL) throw new Error('whatever');
    
    const second = await apiCall2(data.whatever);
    const data2 = validate2(second);
    if (data2 === FAIL) throw new Error('something else');

    // process data we now know is good.
    return processData(data);
  } catch (err) {
    console.error(err);
    return 'Failure';
  }
}

class Screen1 extends React.Component {
  async proceedApiCheck () {
    const nextScreen = await doTheThing();
    this.navigateToScreen(nextScreen);
  }
}
      
  1. Here we return the failure screen trigger in one place only. The functions all have clear exits.
  2. There is a convenience function that unboxes the request (or hides the details of an xhr if that's how you roll).
  3. All of the validation and business logic is independently testable. It's also in one place instead of spread on various places in a lengthy method.
  4. All of the logic is in plain functions that return values, no mocks needed other than for fetch.
  5. The only thing that proceedApiCheck does is get the value from the logic function and navigate to the correct screen, and is simple to mock for a test.

You could, if you're really in to classes, also make all those functions static methods of your class if that's how you roll, but the important thing is that almost none of your tests need complicated mocks, and it should be much more obvious what the code paths are and how to test them.

The high-falutin' software engineering practice you want to adhere to (as pointed out by @DrewReese in the comments) is the Single Responsibility Principle which states that functions/methods should only do one logical operation. A validator only validates, a conditional only does dispatch, a function that gets data from an external source should only get the data (rather than act on it), etc.

4
  • I see, in short static method should be use for function within Classes hence UT can be done right? I guess I need to "decouple my functions and have them to return value" as much as possible hence I can better proceed with UT. Did I get you right?
    – TommyLeong
    Aug 10, 2021 at 7:25
  • 2
    @TommyLeong exactly. You don't need to use static methods: you can use plain functions as I did and it's more of a style thing. But you got the important part right, you want to as much as possible have simple functions/methods that do one thing and return values (rather than modify this). They are much easier to unit test, because they don't have 8 different code paths through them (you really want one, no more than two exit points for a function) and they only depend on their inputs rather than ephemeral object state. Aug 10, 2021 at 10:46
  • 1
    @JaredSmith I'm a huge fan of the Single Responsibility Principle when it comes to code maintainability and testability. You should definitely highlight this aspect!
    – Drew Reese
    Aug 10, 2021 at 16:06
  • 1
    Thanks @JaredSmith for sharing the thoughts and direction. Will try to break functions into unit level for testing and re-usability.
    – TommyLeong
    Aug 12, 2021 at 14:05
0

if you think it is necessary to do unit test for valueCheck (maybe it is a complicated function in real case), move it outside the class and make it testable alone. Then it should be something like:

function valueCheck(value) {
switch(value) {
case 'abc':
    return {shouldProceedApiCheck: true, newState:{ isNavigating:true, transfer: true }}
case '123':
    return {shouldProceedApiCheck: true, { isNavigating:true, transfer: false }}
default:
    return {shouldProceedApiCheck: false, newState: {} }
}

.....

class Screen1 extends React.Component {
....
whenToCall = ()=>{
    const {newState, shouldProceedApiCheck} = valueCheck(value)
    this.setState(valueCheck(newState), ()=>{
        if(shouldProceedApiCheck) {
          this.proceedApiCheck(value)
        }
    })
}
....
}

Further reading: https://medium.com/front-end-weekly/making-testable-javascript-code-2a71afba5120

1
  • I understand your point very similar to what @Jared has shared. Basically splitting functions into smaller unit, and I'll call this functions in my UT. Correct?
    – TommyLeong
    Aug 10, 2021 at 7:26

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