4

I want to execute some function right before the return of another function. The issue is that there are multiple returns and I don't want to copy-paste my call before each of them. Is there a more elegant way of doing this?

void f()
{
    //do something
    if ( blabla )
        return;
    //do something else
    return;
    //bla bla
}

I want to call g() before the function returns.

  • Write a dispatcher: void call_f() { f(); g(); } – Kerrek SB Jul 29 '11 at 13:28
12
struct DoSomethingOnReturn {
  ~DoSomethingOnReturn() {
    std::cout << "just before return" << std::endl;
  }
};
...
void func() {
  DoSomethingOnReturn a;
  if(1 > 2) return;      
}
  • @loki2302 nice trick, but seems overkill to me... I'd just wrap any complexity within a simple function call and return it for syntax sugar – Lea Hayes Jul 29 '11 at 13:20
  • 1
    @Lea Hayes: Why? Simple and idiomatic solution. – Andrey Agibalov Jul 29 '11 at 13:22
  • @loki2302 there is going to be more overhead (depending upon how good the optimizer is) because of unwinding the stack and calling destructors. A simple function is called explicitly so it should theoretically be more efficient. And you can avoid defining structs/classes as a simple function can do the trick. Just my personal preference. – Lea Hayes Jul 29 '11 at 13:25
  • 1
    @Lea: premature optimization in the flesh... . Very likely with modern compilers this will make no difference (RAII is to important to not optimize it) – KillianDS Jul 29 '11 at 13:27
  • @Lea Hayes: Well, in theory compiler is permited to do whatever it wants while semantics is the same. – Andrey Agibalov Jul 29 '11 at 13:32
7

There are some ways to do this.
One would be to use boost::scope_exit or use a struct and do your work in the destructor.
I dislike the preprocessor syntax of boost and I am too lazy to write struct so I prefer using a boost::shared_ptr or on newer compilers a std::shared_ptr. Like this:

std::shared_ptr<void>(nullptr, [](void*){ /* do your stuff here*/ });
  • +1, nice! in fact, i think boost should have a version of scope_exit which leverages this on c++0x compilers! – Evan Teran Jul 29 '11 at 15:00
4

This is often a sign that instead of trying to artificially do something before every return, you should try to refactor your function into single-exit form. Then it's super easy to do your extra step because...there's only one return.

  • What happens if an exception is thrown? – user151019 Aug 3 '12 at 12:36
4

I think try-finally statements will do what you want.

void f()
{
    __try
    {
       //do something
       if ( blabla )
           return;
       //do something else
       return;
      //bla bla
    }
    __finally
   {
      g();
   }
}

The try-finally statement is a Microsoft extension to the C and C++ languages that enables target applications to guarantee execution of cleanup code when execution of a block of code is interrupted. Cleanup consists of such tasks as deallocating memory, closing files, and releasing file handles. The try-finally statement is especially useful for routines that have several places where a check is made for an error that could cause premature return from the routine.

Quoted from msdn.

  • It's not C++, it's Microsoft-specific extensions. – Andrey Agibalov Aug 11 '11 at 12:51
  • Already mentioned that in my answer. its a Microsoft extension to C and C++. But I don't think using an extension makes it non-C++. – Ragesh Chakkadath Aug 11 '11 at 16:48
3
#define RETURN_IT g(); \
        return;

void f()
{
    //do something
    if ( blabla )
        RETURN_IT;
    //do something else
    RETURN_IT;
    //bla bla
}

Simple, although I do kind of like loki's suggestion

2

For this kind of thing, you could simply use a boolean. That way you don't have too many if/else statements:

void f()
{
    //do something
    done = false;
    if ( blabla )
        done = true;
    //do something else

    if (!done) {
        // some code
        done = true;
    }

    if (!done) {
        // some other code
        done = true;
    }

    return;
}
2
void f()
{
    //do something
    if ( blabla )
        return;
    //do something else
    return;
    //bla bla
}

void f_callg()
{
    f();
    g();
}

If there is no access to where f() is called from

void f_copy_of_old()
{
    //do something
    if ( blabla )
        return;
    //do something else
    return;
    //bla bla
}

void f()
{
f_copy_of_old();
g();
}
0
int g() {
    // blah
    return 0;
}

void f() {
    // do something
    if (blabla)
        return g();
    // do something else
    return g();
}
  • @Luchian sorry I misread your question, I have updated my answer – Lea Hayes Jul 29 '11 at 13:17

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.