5

I think I misunderstand the purpose of enums.

I am looking to implement the XML DOM for practice. DOM nodes all have a list of methods associated with them, but some nodes (such as the document node) have additional methods not available on other nodes.

I was hoping to have all the main methods set up on the enum and then the variants would have the methods specific to them, but it seems like the method variants are not callable on an enum, but continue to be callable on the parameter.

#[derive(Clone, Debug, Copy)]
enum MyEnum {
    MyType(MyType),
}

impl MyEnum {
    pub fn do_a_thing(&self) -> i32 {
        // Some code here
        return 1;
    }
}

#[derive(Clone, Debug, Copy)]
pub struct MyType {}

impl MyType {
    pub fn do_another_thing(self) -> i32 {
        // Some more code here
        return 2;
    }
}

fn main() {
    let x = MyEnum::MyType(MyType {});
    println!("{:?}", x);
    println!("I can call do_a_thing, it is {}", x.do_a_thing());
    println!(
        "Why can't I call do_another_thing? {}",
        x.do_another_thing()
    );
}

This works fine, but my gut tells me I am going the wrong way about things:

impl MyEnum {
    pub fn do_a_thing(&self) -> i32 {
        // Some code here
        return 1;
    }

    pub fn do_another_thing(self) -> i32 {
        match self {
            MyEnum::MyType(MT) => MT.do_another_thing(),
        }
    }
}

How should I implement this?

4
  • 1
    You're in the right direction. But there's not much verbosity added in the match, especially as there's usually some special variants with different implementations (see examples) and you can write the branch for a variant in a one liner: MyEnum::MyType(MT) => MT.do_another_thing(),. Aug 11, 2021 at 10:48
  • 3
    You may be looking for trait objects, dynamic dispatch and downcasting rather than enums for your DOM implementation. Aug 11, 2021 at 12:48
  • 1
    Alternatively, you could implement "downcast" methods on your enum, e.g. fn MyEnum::my_type(&mut self) -> MyType could be implemented to unwrap the contained MyType value if the enum has the right variant, and to panic otherwise. This would allow you to call methods conveniently: x.my_type().do_another_thing(). Aug 11, 2021 at 12:50
  • Thanks for the recommendations all, I'll take a look into each one. :)
    – Devasta
    Aug 12, 2021 at 8:13

1 Answer 1

5

You are using an enum, so it's likely you're going to add more variants at some point (otherwise, why would you use enums, right?).

When Rust sees a value whose type is an enum, at compile-time it assumes the value could be any of the enum's variants, so it won't let you call a method on any variant until you check its type.

To do that is easy, as you've already shown in your question:

match self {
    MyEnum::MyType(t) => t.do_another_thing()
}

You might be interested to know there's also if let in case you only want to check a single variant:

let x = MyEnum::MyType(MyType{});
if let MyEnum::MyType(t) = x {
    t.do_another_thing();
}

You might want to have methods that are callable on ALL variants as well, in which case you'll need to either implement the method directly on the enum as you've done above, or use a trait that is implemented by the enum, which perhaps makes your code look more polymorphic as in most other languages (where there would be an interface for the nodes).

That will make your code in main work.

It might look like this:

#[derive(Clone, Debug, Copy)]
enum MyEnum {
    MyType(MyType)
}

impl MyEnum {
    pub fn do_a_thing(&self) -> i32{
        // Some code here
        return 1
    }
}

#[derive(Clone, Debug, Copy)]
pub struct MyType {

}

trait MyTrait {
   fn do_another_thing(&self) -> i32;
}

impl MyTrait for MyEnum {
    fn do_another_thing(&self) -> i32 {
        // Some more code here
        return 2
    }
}

fn main() {

    let x = MyEnum::MyType(MyType{});
    println!("{:?}",x);
    println!("I can call do_a_thing, it is {}", x.do_a_thing());
    println!("Why can't I call do_another_thing? {}", x.do_another_thing());

}
2
  • 5
    Maybe it's important to clarify that, above, the type of x (in the main function) is MyEnum, not MyEnum::MyType. Enum variants are not types on their own.
    – Renato
    Aug 11, 2021 at 13:17
  • Thanks for the reply Renato, I'll give these a go. :)
    – Devasta
    Aug 12, 2021 at 8:12

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