9

I do admit this question is going to be a bit vague, but I will try to explain what I'm trying to accomplish by a few examples. I have some PHP code that loads a bunch of variables from the MySQL database, contains some declarations, some functions to quickly output HTML code etc. However I would love to do all that stuff before anything is sent to the client.

So I do:

<?php
include("somefile.inc");
function bla()
{
    ...
}

if (fails)
    echo "Error: ...<br />";

?>
<!DOCTYPE>
<html>
    <head>
        <script>
            ...
            <?php echo $someString; ?>
            ...
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        ...
    </body>
</html>

This is all fine and ok, until I get an error. The echo will not show in the browser because it's before all HTML... So I modified:

<!DOCTYPE>
<html>
    <head>
        <script>
            ...
            <?php echo $someString; ?>
            ...
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div class="error_block">
            <?php
            include("somefile.inc");
            function bla()
            {
                ...
            }

            if (fails)
                echo "Error: ...<br />";

            ?>
        </div>

        ...

    </body>
</html>

Now I can actually see errors, which is good. But now the problem arises that in the header, or scrips, I cannot access variables that will be loaded later on in the newly created error_block.

I really don't like splitting the code in the error_clock to some above the HTML document and some in the error_block. And I also don't want to use PHP's die() function which abrubtly ends the execution.

Anyone can give their 2 cents on this issue? Thanks.

3
  • 4
    You should not mix PHP and HTML in a single file. Do the logic in one file, and generate the output in another file. Do not use "logic files" from your "HTML generators". Instead, use "HTML generators" from your "logic files". Also, I would not suggest to use .inc extension - source files should end with .php (.inc.php might be allowed, though I would avoid that too), as some servers might not be configured to parse .inc files, when they're requested directly via browser.
    – binaryLV
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 14:30
  • Yes, thanks for the heads up. I think it is difficult to decide when to generate all html from php, or when to use just a bit of php inside the html. As I like to think I did not cross the line yet, a lot of my code it getting messy. Ooh you know, you start small, and then the client needs more features etc, etc.
    – the_source
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 15:18
  • You should look at a framework like CodeIgniter which will help you significantly clean up and separate the login of you site from the HTML.
    – Endophage
    Commented Jul 30, 2011 at 5:15

3 Answers 3

5

If you're looking for an alternate solution, I have one for you. What I like doing is having the logic in before the DOCTYPE

if(error) { $error = "Please do something" }

Than, down in the document I have a div just for the error (Thanks @Dave for the input)

<?php echo $error != '' ? '<div id="error">' . $error . '</div>' : ''; ?>

This div will not appear if there isn't an error (meaning $error is empty) and it makes it easier for you to style the error message the way you would like

#error { color:red; }

If you want to get fancy, you can use some jQuery to hide/show the div so that the error doesn't have to persist.

$('#error').show().delay(7000).fadeOut();
5
  • Why would that div "not appear" - looks to me like it would be there regardless - maybe try wrapping it in an if($error){ block?
    – Dave
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 13:59
  • It would appear in the DOM (if they were to view-source), but it wouldn't be visible to the user.
    – Phil
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 14:01
  • 1
    Depends on what browser you're using. In most, if you add a div (especially one with with spaces in it, like yours), it will push other content down, whether you "see" it or not. Not to mention - what if he adds padding, or background color, or border...etc etc etc.
    – Dave
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 14:03
  • Ok, seriously, why didn't I think of this before... banging head against wall. I too feel it is more straight forward to put all logic at the beginning of the document. I guess this just leaves me just replacing all my echo statements. That won't be fun, but I think it is the best thing to do. Thanks alot.
    – the_source
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 14:44
  • You're welcome, also, take a read at what binaryLV said in the comment section.
    – Phil
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 14:45
0

You should look into using try-catch blocks and generating exceptions if you want to do some post-processing with the error message, which includes display.

-1

What is often forgotten is that PHP is an INLINE programming language in essence, this means it is designed to be processed by the server as the server reads down the page, and with this it is designed to be split up into chunks. Recently OOP (Object Oriented Programming) has been introduced to PHP making it more flexible.

So with this information in hand I would take the OOP path in this case and do something like:

<!DOCTYPE>
<?php
include("somefile.inc");
function bla()
{
    ...
}
function failureError($code){
    if(!empty($code)) ...
}
if ($a = $b) {
    code goes here 
} else {
    $code = 'error123';
}
?>
<html>
    <head>
        <script>
            ...
            <?php failed($code); ?>
            ...
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        ...
    </body>
</html>

By writing using functions you can cut down your development time and group the majority of your code just calling what you need when you need it.

Another way of declaring your error class(es)/functions to help with server response time is to do something like:

if ($a = $b) {
    code goes here 
} else {
    include("errorStuff.php");
}

This will only include the error class(es)/functions when an error is encountered.

Just remember when you're writing PHP with OOP techniques like this that the server will take longer to process the script than if you write inline. The biggest advantage to an OOP basis is it will cut down your development time and if done correctly it will make it easier to administer future updates to your script.

5
  • Functions/classes are OOP practices and not an inline practices, by using a function this is changing the nature of the operation to OOP, if I was to write inline I would write the full code (as used in the function in this case) where it should appear in the page
    – Ryan
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 14:38
  • 3
    Functions (which in PHP mean both functions and procedures) are a concept of procedural programming, and PHP was a procedural language from it's beginning. To be able to talk about OOP you need a concept of 'class' (either as PHP implements it, or as JavaScript's prototype).
    – Mchl
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 14:42
  • Thanks for the reply, put I prefer to refrain from classes as long as possible. I do actually use a lot of functions which generate HTML code, but classes are a bit overkill in most cases IMHO. Being a part time C++ programmer as well it does have some allure to, I admit that :)
    – the_source
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 14:47
  • Yes it was designed procedural as an inline language but functions and classes weren't introduced until later. Classes aren't required for something to be OOP, here is some info to help you with the concept of OOP
    – Ryan
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 14:48
  • @the_source you're welcome but classes aren't directly in my solution, it gives a mention and the option if you want to but the answer only gives a solution with a function that can potentially be re-used for any errors you may need to handle
    – Ryan
    Commented Jul 29, 2011 at 14:50

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