0

I'm new to elixir, I'm trying to find something similar to Python's ContextManager.

Problem:

I have a bunch of functions and I want to add latency metric around them.

Now we have:

def method_1 do
  ...
end

def method_2 do
  ...
end

... more methods

I'd like to have:


def method_1 do
  start = System.monotonic_time()
  ...
  end = System.monotonic_time()
  emit_metric(end-start)
end

def method_2 do
  start = System.monotonic_time()
  ...
  end = System.monotonic_time()
  emit_metric(end-start)
end

... more methods

Now code duplication is a problem

  start = System.monotonic_time()
  ...
  end = System.monotonic_time()
  emit_metric(end-start)

So what is a better way to avoid code duplication in this case? I like the context manager idea in python. But now sure how I can achieve something similar in Elixir, thanks for the help in advance!

2

In Erlang/Elixir this is done through higher-order functions, take a look at BEAM telemetry. It is an Erlang and Elixir library/standard for collecting metrics and instrumenting your code - it is widely adopted by Pheonix, Ecto, cowboy and other libraries. Specifically, you'd be interested in :telemetry.span/3 function as it emits start time and duration measurements by default:

def some_function(args) do
  :telemetry.span([:my_app, :my_function], %{metadata: "Some data"}, fn ->
    result = do_some_work(args)
    {result, %{more_metadata: "Some data here"}}
  end)
end

def do_some_work(args) # actual work goes here

And then, in some other are of your code you listen to those events and log them/send them to APM:

:telemetry.attach_many(
  "test-telemetry", 
  [[:my_app, :my_function, :start], 
   [:my_app, :my_function, :stop], 
   [:my_app, :my_function, :exception]],
  fn event, measurements, metadata, config -> 
    # Handle the actual event.
  end)
  nil
)
1

I think the closest thing to python context manager would be to use higher order functions, i.e. functions taking a function as argument. So you could have something like:

def measure(fun) do
  start = System.monotonic_time()
  result = fun.()  
  stop = System.monotonic_time()
  emit_metric(stop - start)
  result
end

And you could use it like:

measure(fn ->
  do_stuff()
  ...
end)

Note: there are other similar instances where you would use a context manager in python that would be done in a similar way, on the top of my head: Django has a context manager for transactions but Ecto uses a higher order function for the same thing.

PS: to measure elapsed time, you probably want to use :timer.tc/1 though:

def measure(fun) do
  {elapsed, result} = :timer.tc(fun)
  emit_metric(elapsed)
  result
end
0

There is actually a really nifty library called Decorator in which macros can be used to "wrap" your functions to do all sorts of things.

In your case, you could write a decorator module (thanks to @maciej-szlosarczyk for the telemetry example):

defmodule MyApp.Measurements do
  use Decorator.Define, measure: 0

  def measure(body, context) do
    meta = Map.take(context, [:name, :module, :arity])
    quote do
      # Pass the metadata information about module/name/arity as metadata to be accessed later
      :telemetry.span([:my_app, :measurements, :function_call], unquote(meta), fn ->
        {unquote(body), %{}}
      end) 
    end
  end
end

You can set up a telemetry listener in your Application.start definition:

:telemetry.attach_many(
  "my-app-measurements", 
  [[:my_app, :measurements, :function_call, :start], 
   [:my_app, :measurements, :function_call, :stop], 
   [:my_app, :measurements, :function_call, :exception]],
  &MyApp.MeasurementHandler.handle_telemetry/4)
  nil
)

Then in any module with a function call you'd like to measure, you can "decorate" the functions like so:

defmodule MyApp.Domain.DoCoolStuff do
  use MyApp.Measurements
  
  @decorate measure()
  def awesome_function(a, b, c) do
    # regular function logic
  end
end

Although this example uses telemetry, you could just as easily print out the time difference within your decorator definition.

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