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After updating the Java version from 12 to 15, this code now throws a rather non-descriptive SocketException on Windows, but only if IPv6 is disabled on the NetworkInterface:

NetworkInterface networkInterface = NetworkInterface.getByInetAddress(InetAddress.getLocalHost());
DatagramSocket socket = new MulticastSocket(65533);
((MulticastSocket) socket).setTimeToLive(128);
((MulticastSocket) socket).setNetworkInterface(networkInterface); // <-- Exception thrown here

This is the exception:

java.net.SocketException: Invalid argument: no further information
    at java.base/sun.nio.ch.Net.setInterface6(Native Method)
    at java.base/sun.nio.ch.DatagramChannelImpl.setOption(DatagramChannelImpl.java:364)
    at java.base/sun.nio.ch.DatagramSocketAdaptor.setOption(DatagramSocketAdaptor.java:418)
    at java.base/sun.nio.ch.DatagramSocketAdaptor.setNetworkInterface(DatagramSocketAdaptor.java:600)
    at java.base/java.net.MulticastSocket.setNetworkInterface(MulticastSocket.java:466)
    ...

However, if I create the Socket like this, no exception is thrown:

NetworkInterface networkInterface = NetworkInterface.getByInetAddress(InetAddress.getLocalHost());
DatagramSocket socket = new MulticastSocket(
    new InetSocketAddress(Collections.list(networkInterface.getInetAddresses()).get(0), 65533));
((MulticastSocket) socket).setTimeToLive(128);
((MulticastSocket) socket).setNetworkInterface(networkInterface); // <-- No exception is thrown


Is this expected/intended behaviour? If so, is this documented somewhere?


This test script...

System.out.println("Example 1");
try {
    NetworkInterface netIf1 = NetworkInterface.getByInetAddress(InetAddress.getLocalHost());
    System.out.println(netIf1 + " " + Collections.list(netIf1.getInetAddresses()).get(0));
    DatagramSocket sock1 = new MulticastSocket(65533);
    ((MulticastSocket) sock1).setTimeToLive(128);
    ((MulticastSocket) sock1).setNetworkInterface(netIf1);
    System.out.println("Success");
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
            
System.out.println("Example 2");
try {
    NetworkInterface netIf2 = NetworkInterface.getByInetAddress(InetAddress.getLocalHost());
    System.out.println(netIf2 + " " + Collections.list(netIf2.getInetAddresses()).get(0));
    DatagramSocket sock2 = new MulticastSocket(new InetSocketAddress(Collections.list(netIf2.getInetAddresses()).get(0), 65533));
    ((MulticastSocket) sock2).setTimeToLive(128);
    ((MulticastSocket) sock2).setNetworkInterface(netIf2);
    System.out.println("Success");
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

...prints the following statements to the console:

Example 1
name:eth8 (Intel(R) Ethernet Connection (7) I219-LM) /10.240.10.193
java.net.SocketException: Invalid argument: no further information
    at java.base/sun.nio.ch.Net.setInterface6(Native Method)
    at java.base/sun.nio.ch.DatagramChannelImpl.setOption(DatagramChannelImpl.java:364)
    at java.base/sun.nio.ch.DatagramSocketAdaptor.setOption(DatagramSocketAdaptor.java:418)
    at java.base/sun.nio.ch.DatagramSocketAdaptor.setNetworkInterface(DatagramSocketAdaptor.java:600)
    at java.base/java.net.MulticastSocket.setNetworkInterface(MulticastSocket.java:466)
    at com.example.MyApplication.createSocket(MyApplication.java:32)
Example 2
name:eth8 (Intel(R) Ethernet Connection (7) I219-LM) /10.240.10.193
Success
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  • Your two pieces of code are not equivalent. The first determines the IP address via which join()s will be sent. The second determines the IP address to which the socket is bound, i.e. the IP address via which it can receive. You need to show what the actual NetworkInterface obtained by your first piece of code is.
    – user207421
    Aug 13, 2021 at 9:34
  • Hi, I have added more context to the second code example. The issue seems to go away when I use the MulticastSocket constructor with the InetSocketAddress with the interface IP as an argument. The network interface which is used in this example is my main ethernet adapter (the build-in Intel network chipset)
    – appnic
    Aug 13, 2021 at 9:40
  • That's what you think. I am asking you for facts. You need to print the NetworkInterface in both cases.
    – user207421
    Aug 13, 2021 at 9:43
  • 1
    When you use new MulticastSocket(65533) this creates a multicast socket bound to the wildcard address. Because your OS/machine supports IPv6 the underlying socket will be IPv6. When you then try to set the NetworkInterface to an interface on which IPv6 is disabled, it fails. The difference in behavior compared to Java 12 is probably an unintended side effect of JEP 373 openjdk.java.net/jeps/373
    – daniel
    Aug 13, 2021 at 11:21
  • 2
    I've created this issue to track it: bugs.openjdk.java.net/browse/JDK-8272476 There are a number of workarounds noted in the issue Aug 14, 2021 at 15:48

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