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In the Bayesian programing language JAGS, I am looking for a way to fix a parameter to a specific distribution, as opposed to a constant. The paragraph below presents this question more explicitly and references JAGS code. I would also be open to answers that use other probabilistic programming languages (e.g., stan).

The first code chunk below (model1) is a JAGS script designed to estimate a two-group Gaussian mixture model with unequal variances. I am looking for a way to fix one of the parameters (say $\mu_2$) to a particular distribution (e.g., dnorm(0,0.0001)). I know how to fix $\mu_2$ to a constant (e.g., see model2 in code chunk 2), though I cannot find a way to fix $\mu_2$ to my prior belief(e.g., see model3 in code chunk 3, which shows conceptually what I am trying to do).

Thanks in advance!

Code chunk 1

model1 = "
model {

for (i in 1:n1){
y1[i] ~ dnorm (mu1 , phi1) 
}

for (i in 1:n2){ 
y2[i] ~ dnorm (mu2 , phi2) 
}

# Priors
phi1 ~ dgamma(.001,.001) 
phi2 ~ dgamma(.001,.001) 
sigma2.1 <- 1/phi1
sigma2.2 <- 1/phi2
mu1 ~ dnorm (0,0.0001) 
mu2 ~ dnorm (0,0.0001)

# Create a variable for the mean difference

delta <- mu1 - mu2

}
"

Code chunk 2

model2 = "
model {

for (i in 1:n1){
y1[i] ~ dnorm (mu1 , phi1) 
}

for (i in 1:n2){ 
y2[i] ~ dnorm (mu2 , phi2) 
}

# Priors
phi1 ~ dgamma(.001,.001) 
phi2 ~ dgamma(.001,.001) 
sigma2.1 <- 1/phi1
sigma2.2 <- 1/phi2
mu1 ~ dnorm (0,0.0001) 
mu2 <- 1.27

# Create a variable for the mean difference

delta <- mu1 - mu2

}
"

Code chunk 3

model3 = "
model {

for (i in 1:n1){
y1[i] ~ dnorm (mu1 , phi1) 
}

for (i in 1:n2){ 
y2[i] ~ dnorm (mu2 , phi2) 
}

# Priors
phi1 ~ dgamma(.001,.001) 
phi2 ~ dgamma(.001,.001) 
sigma2.1 <- 1/phi1
sigma2.2 <- 1/phi2
mu1 ~ dnorm (0,0.0001) 
mu2 <- dnorm (0,0.0001) 

# Create a variable for the mean difference

delta <- mu1 - mu2

}
"

1 Answer 1

1

I don't know JAGS, but here are two Stan versions. One takes a single sample of mu2 across all iterations; the second takes a different sample of mu2 for each iteration.

Either way, I'm not qualified to judge whether this is actually a good idea. (The second version, in particular, is something that the Stan team has deliberately tried to avoid, for the reasons described here.) But it's at least possible.

(In both examples, I changed some of the prior distributions to make the data easier to work with, but the basic idea is the same.)

One sample of mu2

First, the Stan model.

data {
  int<lower=0> n1;
  vector[n1] y1;
  int<lower=0> n2;
  vector[n2] y2;
}

transformed data {
  // Set mu2 to a single randomly selected value (instead of giving it a prior
  // and estimating it).
  real mu2 = normal_rng(0, 0.0001);
}

parameters {
  real mu1;
  real<lower=0> phi1;
  real<lower=0> phi2;
}

transformed parameters {
  real sigma1 = 1 / phi1;
  real sigma2 = 1 / phi2;
}

model {
  mu1 ~ normal(0, 0.0001);
  phi1 ~ gamma(1, 1);
  phi2 ~ gamma(1, 1);
  y1 ~ normal(mu1, sigma1);
  y2 ~ normal(mu2, sigma2);
}

generated quantities {
  real delta = mu1 - mu2;
  // We can't return mu2 from the transformed data block.  So if we want to see
  // what it was, we have to copy its value into a generated quantity and return
  // that.
  real mu2_return = mu2;
}

Next, R code to generate fake data and fit the model.

# Generate fake data.
n1 = 1000
n2 = 1000
mu1 = rnorm(1, 0, 0.0001)
mu2 = rnorm(1, 0, 0.0001)
phi1 = rgamma(1, shape = 1, rate = 1)
phi2 = rgamma(1, shape = 1, rate = 1)
y1 = rnorm(n1, mu1, 1 / phi1)
y2 = rnorm(n2, mu2, 1 / phi2)
delta = mu1 - mu2

# Fit the Stan model.
library(rstan)
options(mc.cores = parallel::detectCores())
rstan_options(auto_write = T)

stan.data = list(n1 = n1, y1 = y1, n2 = n2, y2 = y2)
stan.model = stan(file = "stan_model.stan",
                  data = stan.data,
                  cores = 3, iter = 1000)

We can extract the samples from the Stan model and see that we correctly recovered the parameters' true values - except, of course, in the case of mu2.

# Pull out the samples.
library(tidybayes)
library(tidyverse)
stan.model %>%
  spread_draws(mu1, phi1, mu2_return, phi2) %>%
  ungroup() %>%
  dplyr::select(.draw, mu1, phi1, mu2 = mu2_return, phi2) %>%
  pivot_longer(cols = -c(.draw), names_to = "parameter") %>%
  ggplot(aes(x = value)) +
  geom_histogram() +
  geom_vline(data = data.frame(parameter = c("mu1", "phi1", "mu2", "phi2"),
                               true.value = c(mu1, phi1, mu2, phi2)),
             aes(xintercept = true.value), color = "red", size = 1.5) +
  facet_wrap(~ parameter, scales = "free") +
  theme_bw() +
  scale_x_continuous("Parameter value") +
  scale_y_continuous("Number of samples")

enter image description here

New sample of mu2 for each iteration

We can't generate a random number in the parameters, transformed parameters, or model block; again, this is a deliberate design choice. But we can generate a whole bunch of numbers in the transformed data block and grab a new one for each iteration. To do this, we need a way to figure out which iteration we're on in the parameters block. I used Louis's solution from the end of this discussion on the Stan forums. First, save the following C++ code as iter.hpp in your working directory:

static int itct = 1;
inline void add_iter(std::ostream* pstream__) {
    itct += 1;
}
inline int get_iter(std::ostream* pstream__) {
    return itct;
}

Next, define the Stan model as follows. The functions add_iter() and get_iter() are defined in iter.hpp; if you're working in RStudio, you'll get error symbols when you edit the Stan file because RStudio doesn't know that we're going to bring in those function definitions from elsewhere.

functions {
  void add_iter();
  int get_iter();
}

data {
  int<lower=0> n1;
  vector[n1] y1;
  int<lower=0> n2;
  vector[n2] y2;
  int<lower=0> n_iterations;
}

transformed data {
  vector[n_iterations + 1] all_mu2s;
  for(n in 1:(n_iterations + 1)) {
    all_mu2s[n] = normal_rng(0, 0.0001);
  }
}

parameters {
  real mu1;
  real<lower=0> phi1;
  real<lower=0> phi2;
}

transformed parameters {
  real sigma1 = 1 / phi1;
  real sigma2 = 1 / phi2;
  real mu2 = all_mu2s[get_iter()];
}

model {
  mu1 ~ normal(0, 0.0001);
  phi1 ~ gamma(1, 1);
  phi2 ~ gamma(1, 1);
  y1 ~ normal(mu1, sigma1);
  y2 ~ normal(mu2, sigma2);
}

generated quantities {
  real delta = mu1 - mu2;
  add_iter();
}

Note that the model actually generates 1 more random value for mu2 than we need. When I tried generating exactly n_iterations random values, I got an error informing me that Stan had tried to access all_mu2s[1001]. I find this worrisome, because it means I don't fully understand what's going on internally - shouldn't there be only 1000 iterations, given the R code below? But it just looks like an off-by-one error, and the fitted model looks reasonable, so I didn't pursue this further.

Also, note that this approach gets the iteration number, but not the chain. I ran just one chain; if you run more than one chain, the ith value of mu2 will be the same in each chain. That same Stan forums discussion has a suggestion for distinguishing among chains, but I didn't explore it.

Finally, generate fake data and fit the model to it. When we compile the model, we need to sneak in the function definitions from iter.hpp, as described here.

# Generate fake data.
n1 = 1000
n2 = 1000
mu1 = rnorm(1, 0, 0.0001)
mu2 = rnorm(1, 0, 0.0001)
phi1 = rgamma(1, shape = 1, rate = 1)
phi2 = rgamma(1, shape = 1, rate = 1)
y1 = rnorm(n1, mu1, 1 / phi1)
y2 = rnorm(n2, mu2, 1 / phi2)
delta = mu1 - mu2
n.iterations = 1000

# Fit the Stan model.
library(rstan)
stan.data = list(n1 = n1, y1 = y1, n2 = n2, y2 = y2,
                 n_iterations = n.iterations)
stan.model = stan_model(file = "stan_model.stan",
                        allow_undefined = T,
                        includes = paste0('\n#include "',
                                          file.path(getwd(), 'iter.hpp'),
                                          '"\n'))
stan.model.fit = sampling(stan.model,
                          data = stan.data,
                          chains = 1,
                          iter = n.iterations,
                          pars = c("mu1", "phi1", "mu2", "phi2"))

Once again, we recovered the values of mu1, phi1, and phi2 reasonably well. This time, we used a whole range of values for mu2, which follow the specified distribution.

# Pull out the samples.
library(tidybayes)
library(tidyverse)
stan.model.fit %>%
  spread_draws(mu1, phi1, mu2, phi2) %>%
  ungroup() %>%
  dplyr::select(.draw, mu1, phi1, mu2 = mu2, phi2) %>%
  pivot_longer(cols = -c(.draw), names_to = "parameter") %>%
  ggplot(aes(x = value)) +
  geom_histogram() +
  stat_function(dat = data.frame(parameter = "mu2", value = 0),
                fun = function(.x) { dnorm(.x, 0, 0.0001) * 0.01 },
                color = "blue", size = 1.5) +
  geom_vline(data = data.frame(parameter = c("mu1", "phi1", "mu2", "phi2"),
                               true.value = c(mu1, phi1, mu2, phi2)),
             aes(xintercept = true.value), color = "red", size = 1.5) +
  facet_wrap(~ parameter, scales = "free") +
  theme_bw() +
  scale_x_continuous("Parameter value") +
  scale_y_continuous("Number of samples")

enter image description here

4
  • Yes, you hit on exactly what I am looking to do. I want to draw a new value of mu2 for each iteration without making it a regular parameter.
    – R_user1233
    Aug 24, 2021 at 3:03
  • Also, after just looking at the stan manual, what I am trying to do is analogous to including a constant with known measurement error.
    – R_user1233
    Aug 24, 2021 at 3:19
  • Got it; thanks. It turns out there is a way (albeit non-trivial) to get one sample per iteration; I've updated the post accordingly.
    – A. S. K.
    Aug 24, 2021 at 15:29
  • 1
    In JAGS, you could get one draw overall (not by iteration), by putting the stochastic node definition in the data{} block rather than the model{} block. Here is a discussion about how you could do it in JAGS, though it is pretty unsatisfying from a computational point of view. Oct 15, 2021 at 16:08

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