5

I use the following code snippet (in Xcode 13 Beta 5 and deployment target set to 14.0) to apply view modifiers conditionally according to iOS version:

struct ContentView: View {
    var body: some View {
        Text("Hello, world!")
            .modifyFor(iOS14: {
                $0.onAppear {
                    //do some stuff
                }
            }, iOS15: {
                $0.task { //<---- Error: 'task(priority:_:)' is only available in iOS 15.0 or newer
                    //do some stuff
                }
            })
    }
}

struct CompatibleView<Input: View,
                      Output14: View,
                      Output15: View>: View {
    var content: Input
    var iOS14modifier: ((Input) -> Output14)?
    var iOS15modifier: ((Input) -> Output15)?
    
   @ViewBuilder var body: some View {
        if #available(iOS 15, *) {
            if let modifier = iOS15modifier {
                 modifier(content)
            }
            else { content }
        }
        else {
            if let modifier = iOS14modifier {
                 modifier(content)
            }
            else { content }
        }
    }
}

extension View {
    func modifyFor<T: View, U: View>(iOS14: ((Self) -> T)? = nil,
                                     iOS15: ((Self) -> U)? = nil) -> some View {
         CompatibleView(content: self,
                                  iOS14modifier: iOS14,
                                  iOS15modifier: iOS15)
    }
}

this code works great as long as I don't use iOS 15's view modifiers, but if I want to use any of those modifiers (like Task for ex.) then I need to use the #available directive which's an option I don't wanna opt in, because my codebase is large, there are many parts that should adopt the new iOS 15 modifiers and by using #available everywhere in the code will make it looks like a dish of Lasagna.

how to make this piece of code compiles in a clean way and without using the #available check ?

4
1

There is no way to do this without 'if #available', but there is a way to structure it in a somewhat clean way.

Define your own View Modifier on a wrapper View:

struct Backport<Content> {
    let content: Content
}

extension View {
    var backport: Backport<Self> { Backport(content: self) }
}

extension Backport where Content: View {
    @ViewBuilder func badge(_ count: Int) -> some View {
        if #available(iOS 15, *) {
            content.badge(count)
        } else {
            content
        }
    }
}

You can then use these like this:

TabView {
    Color.yellow
        .tabItem {
            Label("Example", systemImage: "hand.raised")
        }
        .backport.badge(5)
}

Blog post about it: Using iOS-15-only View modifiers in older iOS versions

-1

There is no logical use case for that modifier for the issue you are trying to solve! You have no idea, how many times your app would check your condition about availability of iOS15 in each render! Maybe 1000 of times! Insane number of control which is totally bad idea! instead use deferent Views for each scenarios like this, it would checked just one time:

WindowGroup {
    
    if #available(iOS 15, *) {
        
        ContentView_For_iOS15()
        
    }
    else {
        
        ContentView_For_No_iOS15()
        
    }

}
2
  • 2
    and if your view is 200 lines of code, you will end up maintaining ~400 lines of code
    – JAHelia
    Aug 25 '21 at 5:40
  • There is not such a big difference between iOS 15 and 14, mostly you would copy and paste the code and small edit on codes for what you want.
    – swiftPunk
    Aug 25 '21 at 8:33
-1

There is no point because even if you did back-port a modifier named task (which is how this problem is normally solved) you won’t be able to use all the magic of async/await inside which is what it was designed for. If you have a good reason for not targeting iOS 15 (I don’t know any good ones) then just continue to use onAppear as normal and either standard dispatch queue async or Combine in an @StateObject.

7
  • the point is: I want to leverage iOS 15's modifiers in my iOS 14 project, such as .listRowSeparator and tens of other modifiers, so that when time comes to ditch iOS 14 support that will be a breeze. Currently I want to support both OS'es + full power of 15
    – JAHelia
    Aug 24 '21 at 11:25
  • 1
    Changing style is different than task vs onAppear. You can run into this easily with target differences such as showing a list in a watch vs iOS. I use a BridgeView for this. It keeps all the ugly in the Bridge and the rest is reusable across targets Aug 24 '21 at 12:51
  • @loremipsum the OP wants this done in the same iOS target.
    – malhal
    Aug 25 '21 at 17:45
  • @JAHelia just target iOS 15. The tiny number of users that stay on iOS 14 can still download an old version of the app.
    – malhal
    Aug 25 '21 at 17:46
  • @malhal I just mentioned it as a similar use case where the same action is required when using a .listRowSeparator and differentiating between iOS 14 and iOS 15 and picking .listStyle(CarouselListStyle()) for watch and .listStyle(PlainListStyle()) for a phone. It can be handled in almost the exact same way. I had an answer posted that demonstrated this but deleted it because it is an alternative for the user not a solution for the problem. .task and onAppear are too different to be handled in the same way. Aug 25 '21 at 19:12

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.