8

I have a method that I want to use to sort a list:

private static IQueryable<T> BuildQuery<T>(IQueryable<T> query, 
                                           string methodName, 
                                           Expression<Func<T, object>> property)             
    {
        var typeArgs = new[] { query.ElementType, property.Body.Type };

        methodCall = Expression.Call(typeof (Queryable),
                                                  methodName,
                                                  typeArgs,
                                                  query.Expression,
                                                  property);

        return query.Provider.CreateQuery<T>(methodCall);
    }

I get an exception when I execute the code using the following args:

var myPreExistingQuery = new List<SomeType>{ new SomeType() }.AsQueryable();
var query = BuildQuery(myPreExistingQuery, "OrderBy", x => x.SomeProperty);

The exception is:

No method 'OrderBy' on type 'System.Linq.Queryable' is compatible with the supplied arguments.

Can anyone see what I'm missing here?

EDIT:

I tried another overload of Expression.Call() and got the same same exception:

private static IQueryable<T> BuildQuery<T>(IQueryable<T> query, string methodName, Expression<Func<T, object>> propertyExpression)             
    {
        var methodCall = Expression.Call(query.Expression,
                                         methodName,
                                         new[] {query.ElementType, property.Body.Type},
                                         new[] {propertyExpression});

        return query.Provider.CreateQuery<T>(methodCall);
    }
  • could you show me the construction of myPreExistingQuery please? – Femaref Jul 31 '11 at 22:26
  • I added it above the method call. – Byron Sommardahl Jul 31 '11 at 22:36
11

Since you want your property selector expression to make the appropriate calls dynamically, you must create a new expression for it. You cannot use the provided selector as-is since it is currently typed Expression<Func<T, object>> and not returning your specific type Expression<Func<T, SomeType>>. You might be able to get it to compile by changing the type arguments of the call to accept object but it will not work as expected since it will be doing object reference comparisons (and your LINQ provider will may reject it anyway).

To recreate your selector expression, you could do this:

private static IQueryable<T> BuildQuery<T>(
    IQueryable<T> query,
    string methodName,
    Expression<Func<T, object>> property)
{
    var typeArgs = new[] { query.ElementType, property.Body.Type };
    var delegateType = typeof(Func<,>).MakeGenericType(typeArgs);
    var typedProperty = Expression.Lambda(delegateType, property.Body, property.Parameters);

    var methodCall = Expression.Call(
        typeof(Queryable),
        methodName,
        typeArgs,
        query.Expression,
        typedProperty);

    return query.Provider.CreateQuery<T>(methodCall);
}

A nice alternative to doing this would be to make the property type generic too. That way, you'll get an appropriately strongly typed selector from the start.

private static IQueryable<TSource> BuildQuery<TSource, TProperty>(
    IQueryable<TSource> query,
    string methodName,
    Expression<Func<TSource, TProperty>> property)
{
    var typeArguments = property.Type.GetGenericArguments();

    var methodCall = Expression.Call(
        typeof(Queryable),
        methodName,
        typeArguments,
        query.Expression,
        property);

    return query.Provider.CreateQuery<TSource>(methodCall);
}
  • That was IT exactly. What you said makes perfect sense. I pasted in your code and my tests started running. Thanks for your great answer. – Byron Sommardahl Jul 31 '11 at 22:51
  • I've added another alternative to recreating the expression. It strictly isn't necessary to make the source generic only, you could make both types generic. – Jeff Mercado Aug 1 '11 at 0:14
  • Your alternative will be good for others and it definitely makes the function more flexible. But unfortunately, I cannot make the property type generic since I don't know the type until runtime. – Byron Sommardahl Aug 1 '11 at 0:17
  • Ah ok. So I guess that means you're dynamically generating the property selector then. It's still a nice addition if you always know the expression at compile time. – Jeff Mercado Aug 1 '11 at 0:21

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.